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a question about depression in general

rekcerW

Well-Known Member
i've heard lots of supposed stories of success where joe-blow magically finds a solution to fighting depression by doing some extraordinary thing.

is that real though? i've never fucking felt that.

i'm sure it's different for everybody, but to me, depression is just this fucking thing that is always lingering over your shoulder waiting for an opportunity to destroy you in your entirety. i couldn't fucking fathom a solution to it; as i know it, it's just there so when shit starts to go kind of sideways, it just tips everything over and lays you out in the perfect spot so everything lands on your fucking face.

pills help a lot, i think. it is nice not blowing the fuck up about shit that bothers you. i can't find something with them that is a definitive point where it's like, 'is this shit actually working, and it's not some kind of placebo bullshit?' i don't want to delve into extravagant medication, i'm hoping i can find a solution among SSRIs, but like i don't feel that it's possible for me to not have depression just trying to fucking fuck with me all the time. it's just there, it's always there. i can't imagine a life without it.

how can you just have something like that go away? i don't feel like it's possible, and there are lots of misinformed fuckheads that pretend like anything can just happen at a whim. it would be great, but i just can't see it.

has anybody here just found some crazy method to just never deal with depression again and never be worried about it? i'd love to know the story, because i don't think it fucking exists.

i've been struck down from pretty high up before, that shit does not seem to care where you are or who you are.
 

quoting_mungo

Well-Known Member
i've heard lots of supposed stories of success where joe-blow magically finds a solution to fighting depression by doing some extraordinary thing.

is that real though? i've never fucking felt that.

i'm sure it's different for everybody, but to me, depression is just this fucking thing that is always lingering over your shoulder waiting for an opportunity to destroy you in your entirety. i couldn't fucking fathom a solution to it; as i know it, it's just there so when shit starts to go kind of sideways, it just tips everything over and lays you out in the perfect spot so everything lands on your fucking face.

pills help a lot, i think. it is nice not blowing the fuck up about shit that bothers you. i can't find something with them that is a definitive point where it's like, 'is this shit actually working, and it's not some kind of placebo bullshit?' i don't want to delve into extravagant medication, i'm hoping i can find a solution among SSRIs, but like i don't feel that it's possible for me to not have depression just trying to fucking fuck with me all the time. it's just there, it's always there. i can't imagine a life without it.

how can you just have something like that go away? i don't feel like it's possible, and there are lots of misinformed fuckheads that pretend like anything can just happen at a whim. it would be great, but i just can't see it.

has anybody here just found some crazy method to just never deal with depression again and never be worried about it? i'd love to know the story, because i don't think it fucking exists.

i've been struck down from pretty high up before, that shit does not seem to care where you are or who you are.
I don’t know all the answers, but I do know I need to believe that it’s possible. The idea that chronic depression is something that is impossible to shake is one of the most frightening ideas ever, to me. So I can’t point you to specific stories; it’s possible that what vague stories I have shadow-memories of hearing were of people dealing with short-term, rather than chronic, depression.

I can say that my personal experience doesn’t leave much room for doubt that antidepressants do something. One of my previous ones had a short half-life, and fuck if a truly bad day didn’t suspiciously often correlate to me discovering after the fact that I missed a dose.
 
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Hogo

Unrespectable Member
Depression is more often than not genetic and something you are born and have to live with and the best path I think beyond medicine which can only do so much is simple but ever-difficult lifestyle maintenance: consistent sleep schedule, good diet, exercise, tidiness. Also don't do hard drugs, get a gambling addiction, or be prone to committing crimes that land you in financial hell because of bail. Don't have accidents if you're straight. That's the baseline a lot of people with depression should fix first, easy to say, incredibly hard to achieve.
 

Hogo

Unrespectable Member
Don't work customer service, retail, or food service.

Can't forget to mention that.
 

Rayd

profound asshole
i can't help but feel as if depression never really completely goes away once you have it. i think it really depends on how fucked you and your life really are though. like for some people it may go away completely but for others they can't fathom being rid of it, as you said. but from an outside point of view its pretty difficult to know how deep people really were (or are) in their rut, and what other mental health or trauma factors there are, which all i believe are pretty important variables in evaluating how much it'll "go away" for that particular person, or in the case of those that rid themselves of it, how easy or difficult it was for them to get out of it.

but in my blunt hot-take-esque subjective opinion, if you were able to get rid of your depression entirely, it wasn't true depression. it's one thing to get professional help to be able to suppress it and be able to live with it healthily, but getting rid of it? i just think that sort of thing is always apart of you once it develops and becomes a huge part of your life.
 

RogueNoodle

toe bean enthusiast
Speaking from personal experience, depression is a lot of work. A lot. It sucks. But something my long-time therapist, psychiatrists, and psychology professors have all told me is that it is important to try to view it as a 'physical ailment.' For example, those with diabetes require attention and medication to make sure they are successful, happy, and healthy. Why not give yourself that same level of care and attention? This is in no way trying to exactly equate the two, but hopefully you get the picture. At the end of the day your mental health is still a big part of your overall health! Perhaps it will always linger, but we have to try to be kinder to ourselves about our journey in getting through it.

I've been on countless meds, I've been in therapy for 10+ years, and have a medical implant for depression (that also helps with seizures). I've hit some really bad lows. But right now I'm at a really stable place. I'm finally holding a job again, haven't acted out on myself or anyone else in a couple years, and my inner dialogue is getting healthier. Ride the waves and remember the highs.

Much love, keep truckin'!
 

Parabellum3

I'm not a furry if I have feathers.
I recommend trying to find the right medication combination for you. It will take a while and could be rough, but this is probably by far the most effective treatment that you could get, aside from doing things that can help you get distracted temporarily.
 
O

O.D.D.

Guest
Don't work customer service, retail, or food service.

Can't forget to mention that.
That didn't depress me, it made me utterly despise people. YMMV though.

Depression as in clinical depression is extraordinarily difficult to "push through" without medications. It just absolutely drains you. Sometimes it manifests severely enough to cause a dull ache. Nothing feels rewarding or engaging. Pushing against that without rectifying extant chemical imbalances is incredibly difficult to do for extended periods of time.
 

TyraWadman

The Brutally Honest Man-Child
Everyone's case of treating their depression seems vastly different. I don't believe there is a cure. Your body can't physically be at a constant high or it'll crash, even if you didn't have it.

My experiences sound similar to RogueNoodles', in the sense that it takes a lot of work and to just remember that this hurdle is only temporary (as long as you don't give into it again, that is).
 
T

the sleepiest kitty

Guest
I have depression, dysphoria (not gender dysohoria!), PTSD since age 8 and have had a broken heart since 2012. It gets worse every year that passes by, and nothing helps. My meds help with mood-related issues and such, but the sadness, flat effect, and emotional numbness never has truely gone away. I'll be happy for about 2 to 4 days, then happy/sad for a day or two, then I'll sink into a bottomless pit that can last for almost an entire month, if not longer. I wish I could just stop feeling this way. I just wish I could know what true happiness feels like. Last time I felt this happiness was age five, right before the abuse began.
 

LameFox

Well-Known Member
About a decade ago when I was at the roughly the lowest point of it I did find that I could just let go of a lot of those feelings. Not a miracle or anything, it doesn't solve things medically. I still have a low emotional range (except in dreams, for some reason?), and times when I just feel worse for no apparent reason, but I can let those feelings play out now without lending them any credibility by assuming they have a basis in reality. It was only something on the psychological side I guess, but it made things a lot more bearable. Like I'd been carrying around a lifetime of accumulated negative emotions and one day I realized I didn't need any of it, dropped the lot by the side of the road and walked off. At the time it felt like a very sudden and profound relief, and I guess experiencing something like that could convince people they'd found some secret to it.

This is a bit dark, but if you know the feeling, it was a bit like the sense of relief that comes from deciding to kill yourself, and knowing you won't have to worry about anything anymore. But instead of coming from a sense of escape it was more like letting go by accepting things and just being okay with them.

Whether it's something anyone can do, I have no idea. I don't even know exactly how I arrived at that point, only that it made perfect sense at the time. While the feeling of relief did wear off, I've never gone back to how bad I was before that. But because I can't explain how to arrive at it, I don't really think of it as 'a solution'. For all I know it could be some weird thing I got lucky with.

The one part that still bothers me these days is the emotional range, or lack thereof. I wish there was something I could do about it but even on SSRIs that never improved for me, and I tried a lot of them.
 
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