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Advice for girl entering the workforce?

MCtheBeardie

Queen of Laziness
I know this is an odd question to ask to a forum meant for a fandom, but I honestly don’t know who else to ask, lol.

Anyway, I’m really in need of a job, but considering my current experience and youth, I don’t really know where to start concerning entering work life. What positions and jobs should I apply for? What advice could you guys give me for acing interviews, and increasing my chances of getting hired? All that good stuff! I’ve gone to quite a few interviews already, but I’d appreciate any info you guys have to offer me!

For those who do help me out, thank you so much, you likely just made my day~
 

BeauJayWolffo47

Here To Stay It Seems!
Well for someone your age you really don’t have a lot of job options sadly you have retail and restaurants but as for advice? Maybe think of some experience or something you’re into maybe? Keep trying and I’m sure you’ll be a great worker when you get hired!
 

MCtheBeardie

Queen of Laziness
Well for someone your age you really don’t have a lot of job options sadly you have retail and restaurants but as for advice? Maybe think of some experience or something you’re into maybe? Keep trying and I’m sure you’ll be a great worker when you get hired!

Thanks, fren! I'm applying mainly for retail, as a cashier right now. I've been told that's a good place to start. I appreciate the feedback!
 

BeauJayWolffo47

Here To Stay It Seems!
Thanks, fren! I'm applying mainly for retail, as a cashier right now. I've been told that's a good place to start. I appreciate the feedback!
Anytime! I’ve been working at a restaurant for years and I’m just now learning to be a server. You’ll do great!
 
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CrookedCroc

Guest
Retail work might be a pain in the ass but it will teach you a lot about dealing with stinkos.

The only advice I can think of right now is that you should think of a few questions to ask the interviewer, that way you show you're serious and actually interested in the job/company
 
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Disgruntledfox

Guest
Do you have any experience? Even volunteer work could be counted towards work experience. You just have to clarify why it does.
 

jffry890

Well-Known Member
Part-time cashier. Look for better work or go to school as you're working there. With these minimum wage retail/fast food jobs, the number one thing you can do is show up. You can put in minimal effort but as long as you show up on time you'll be better off than your coworkers in the eyes of your manager. Being reliable is a huge deal in the workforce. Get in good with the boss so you can use them as a reference for better work.

Or go into labor and learn a trade. That's always an option. Get some sick biceps and a wicked tan.
 

GarthTheWereWolf

Captious Lycanthrope of Forum Legend
If this would be your first job, don’t be picky and hope for that perfect fit dream job. Most all entry level positions suck, but we all have to do our time in the barrel in order to move upward. Apply everywhere. The important thing is to gain experience to show on your resume that you have worked somewhere for at least 6 months should you choose to do something else down the line.

For interviews, dress professionally. If you have tattoos or piercings other than your ears, cover/remove them. Smile, have good eye contact, upright posture, and be assertive. People are drawn to a confident demeanor. Shake their hand when you start the interview and when you leave. Remember to thank them for their time.

Be prepared for the “Tell me about yourself question.” Act like you’re trying to sell them a product (you are: you) and list your strengths. Practice your response with other people first if possible so it sounds smooth and natural.

Interviewers almost always end with, “Do you have any questions?” Try to think of a few relevant questions to the job in advance (don’t ask about time off or vacation though. Makes you seem lazy.) I’ve had good luck with responding to that question by looking them in the eye, smiling, and saying “So, am I hired and when can I start?”

I also recommend writing a thank you letter or at the very least a thank you email, thanking them for their time and consideration and sending it to them. I have gotten a few jobs just from being the only person to follow up on an interview in that manner. Helps you stand out from the masses.

Otherwise, don’t get discouraged if it takes a few tries to get hired and just keep at it. You’ll get one eventually.
 

Keefur

aka Cutter Cat
Garth above gave some really good advice. I would have some answers prepared for the usual questions like, "Why do you want to work here?" Be honest and tell them that you are anxious to get into the work force and channel your energy into doing a job and making money. As far as not having experience, try to use what I call "verbal judo". Turn your weakness into an asset. Tell them that you are a blank slate and ready to be properly trained to do the job because you don't have any preconcieved ideas on how things need to be done. This makes things easier for the managers and trainers a lot of times. You can also get some character references in writing and have them available. It is better to be over-prepared rather than going into an interview like you were being grilled by a traffic cop. Good luck and let me know how it works out.
 

Minerva_Minx

Succumbing to her own psychosis
From one woman to another - don't limit yourself. Don't accept a hand out. Don't accept something because it's what you're supposed to do. Don't accept where you are because others limit you.

My first job was retail, my second was working for a man who saw potential in me and taught me investments. And when the time came, he gave me advice with my parents that got me into the military. but always, he made it clear it had to be my choice what I did. that way, I would be the best at it because I wanted to be the best.

Be you. everything else will follow in due course.
 

Trevorbluesquirrel

Well-Known Member
I'm sure this doesn't apply to you, but 1 overlooked tip is to make sure your contact info is professional as well!

I read about a hiring manager that was about to email a woman, telling her she got the job, but it turned out she had a very risque email address, and they never messaged her!

So, this woman lost out on a job because of her email address! It happens!

Point is, your personal details can matter too!
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
If you list your qualifications and any experience you do have in your opening post, users might be able to provide more bespoke advice.

Have you written a resumé/curriculum vitae?
 
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Sagt

Guest
Apply for pretty much every entry level job you see. Websites like indeed are good, but if you're confident enough you can also ask directly at restaurants, cafés and stores, which you think might be big employers, about whether they have any vacancies and if you can drop off your CV. Do this during a quiet time of the day, though, and dress nicely. Also, be confident and friendly, or at least try to pretend you are if you aren't.

You can't really be picky. Even if you find a find a vacancy that you're unsure whether you would want to take, apply anyway. You're not obliged to accept the position, in case something better comes up, but it's better to have something lined up than nothing.

Also, keep in mind that job hunting is a numbers game, just apply for as many jobs as you can and hopefully one of them will come back good. Don't be disheartened by the rejection, you just have to be persistent with it.
 
Make sure your resume is formatted in a way that scans easily and has keywords. A lot of employers just jam it through a scanner to filter what they consider chaff. Emphasis on what they consider. :rolleyes:


But you'll be looking at retail and restaurant jobs. Be careful with the food industry, because there is a whole lot of shenanigans that go on with pay (or the lack thereof).
 

MCtheBeardie

Queen of Laziness
If you list your qualifications and any experience you do have in your opening post, users might be able to provide more bespoke advice.

Have you written a resumé/curriculum vitae?

Yes, I do have a resume! I can add all of those things, if you think it can help, fren.

As for everyone else, thank you so much for the advice! It fills me with so much confidence, it really does~
 

Minerva_Minx

Succumbing to her own psychosis
Yes, I do have a resume! I can add all of those things, if you think it can help, fren.

As for everyone else, thank you so much for the advice! It fills me with so much confidence, it really does~

Linkedin?
 

MaelstromEyre

Slippery When Wet
You can also sometimes get a light manufacturing job - they generally provide all the training and often have better pay, especially if it's a union place. Where I work, the starting pay for someone with NO experience is $16/hour, full time (40 hour week) with lots of opportunity for overtime (which is time and a half in pay, so you're making $24/hour for anything over 40 hours per week). Full benefits, paid vacation, paid holidays. When you become a "full" employee and get into the union, your base pay goes up to about $25/hour plus all the benefits. Granted, it is full time, and your schedule may change a lot when you're "new" because they just put you where they need you. So, if you're a student it may not be the best situation.
As far as general "things to know" about the working world - just be a decent person, don't let yourself get caught up in workplace drama. While you like to think that you're all "on the same team" with your co workers, there are some who are perfectly happy to sit back and let you do all the hard work while they socialize. Others like to stir the rumor pot, gossip, etc. It just creates a hostile place to work.
Remember that it's not the last job you'll ever have. Take every opportunity to pick up new skills and learn what you can, but keep in mind that most companies just see workers as easily replaced labor. If your employee plan includes perks like tuition reimbursement or cell phone discounts or things like that, take advantage of them.
 
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