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Animal Species with unique spines (not spikes)?

Hey guys!
I've been wanting to make a new sona in addition to my others that reflects me a bit more personally than usual. Because of this, I want to choose an animal that has something special about its spine.
I don't mean spine as in spikes, but as in the vertebrae!
The only two I've thought of are a snake (...which is pretty much all spine), and a turtle/tortoise (whose shells are essentially their spines!).
If anyone knows of any other animals that have something unique about their spine, let me know! Only thing is I am not looking for fish or sea creature suggestions. Just mammals, reptiles and birds, pretty much!

Thanks for any suggestions! ^^
 

The_biscuits_532

Sneaky rainforest kitty
Lemme think of some:
- Xenarthrans have their spines fused in certain places, which makes them more robust but less flexible. The group contains Armadillos, Anteaters, Tamandua and Sloths
- Armadillos also have the whole segmented banded armour thing going on. The ancient, giant Glyptodons had more turtle-like configurations.
- Birds and large land animals (like Titanosaurs or Paraceratheres) have hollow bones to compensate for gravity. Oddly enough, from what I remember, the Azhdarchids, the largest ever flying animals, didn't, and instead had to launch themselves off of cliffs.
- Chondrichthyes (Sharks, Rays and Chimeras) have spines made out of cartilage, like the rest of their bones
- As close relatives to Vertebrates, Echinoderms, like Starfish and Urchins, have rudimentary skeletons that are pentaradially symmetrical, rather than bilaterally.
- Giraffes have the same amount of neck vertebrae as humans (7). Owls have twice as many so they can do the twisty thing
- The most primitive Chordates (Phylum mostly containing vertebrates) don't have spines, but they do have the Notochord, the core component of it. This group contains Tunicates, Salps and Lancelets.
- Hagfish have a skull, but no spine. It's thought they actually devolved their spine.
- Swans hold the record for the most vertebrae at 25
- Ancient giant Amphibians (the Gharial-like Temnospondylians) had spines with bony armour attached.
 
Lemme think of some:
- Xenarthrans have their spines fused in certain places, which makes them more robust but less flexible. The group contains Armadillos, Anteaters, Tamandua and Sloths
- Armadillos also have the whole segmented banded armour thing going on. The ancient, giant Glyptodons had more turtle-like configurations.
- Birds and large land animals (like Titanosaurs or Paraceratheres) have hollow bones to compensate for gravity. Oddly enough, from what I remember, the Azhdarchids, the largest ever flying animals, didn't, and instead had to launch themselves off of cliffs.
- Chondrichthyes (Sharks, Rays and Chimeras) have spines made out of cartilage, like the rest of their bones
- As close relatives to Vertebrates, Echinoderms, like Starfish and Urchins, have rudimentary skeletons that are pentaradially symmetrical, rather than bilaterally.
- Giraffes have the same amount of neck vertebrae as humans (7). Owls have twice as many so they can do the twisty thing
- The most primitive Chordates (Phylum mostly containing vertebrates) don't have spines, but they do have the Notochord, the core component of it. This group contains Tunicates, Salps and Lancelets.
- Hagfish have a skull, but no spine. It's thought they actually devolved their spine.
- Swans hold the record for the most vertebrae at 25
- Ancient giant Amphibians (the Gharial-like Temnospondylians) had spines with bony armour attached.
I have no idea how I didn't think of an armadillo before-- thank you for so many suggestions!!
 

Stray Cat Terry

테리 / 特里 / テリー
Could be irrelevant, but you know cattos have... liquid spines too? OwO
 
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