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Any advice for getting up and going?

DarkoKavinsky

ʎʇʇɐq ʇıq ɐ
This may be directed best at the grey muzzles or older folk who might have experience with this type of deal.

I fucking detest where I am.

It is a dead end state where there's no positives. I've been stuck here for awhile and even when I had a relationship me and (my fiancée) at the time wanted out. We just could never figure out where to go.. (actually agree on.)

So I have a place in mind but how the hell do I go from here to there. I know there's more of a job market there in my field than here, and rent is actually cheaper than where I live now. (Figure out that one!!)

So yeah this would be a very limited budget get out of dodge type scenario anybody pulled this off without selling themselves on a street corner?
 

DarkoKavinsky

ʎʇʇɐq ʇıq ɐ

Stadt

Eeriee the Wendigo
I felt like this up until recently. It's like life went completely stagnant. I was also very unhappy. I tried getting out of my situation a few times with no luck. So I did something spontaneous that couldn't be reversed to force myself into the change I needed to make. It was chaos for a while, but I'm much happier now and way more active and sober.
 

Izzy4895

Vulpine Maid
I haven't made any major moves across state lines or the like; the furthest I moved was perhaps several hours from where I was previously located. Even then, moving for me proved to be a somewhat protracted process. Admittedly, I am not familiar with your situation, so what I did may not be the best comparison. I am not sure what you mean by "dead end state". Is it possible to grit your teeth a bit longer and save up a bit of a "nest egg" before relocating, even if it involves a job(s) that isn't particularly interesting or relevant to what you know? If that's possible (even though unpalatable), it would also buy you some time while you apply for jobs in the area where you plan to relocate. I personally lined things up and made sure I had a job offer to accept in a new location before committing to turn in my notice at my current job and apartment complex. I have never personally "moved out of dodge" on a low budget (something easier said than done), but then again, I was in a different situation.

Rent being cheaper could depend on various circumstances. Hopefully it will translate into more savings for you if you manage to relocate, but on the other hand, lower rent could also be a result of lower average wages and benefits of that area as well.
 

Saiko

GTWT Survivor
I can't offer much advice on how to make it happen, but I can warn you about a hidden cost: registering your car if you have one. Swapping that to another state can run you a couple thousand in some cases, plus whatever it costs to get a new license. You'll want to do some research on that and perhaps make some phone calls before you make your move.
 

DarkoKavinsky

ʎʇʇɐq ʇıq ɐ
I can't offer much advice on how to make it happen, but I can warn you about a hidden cost: registering your car if you have one. Swapping that to another state can run you a couple thousand in some cases, plus whatever it costs to get a new license. You'll want to do some research on that and perhaps make some phone calls before you make your move.
If that's the case then I'd just sell off what I got up here and buy one down there.
I haven't made any major moves across state lines or the like; the furthest I moved was perhaps several hours from where I was previously located. Even then, moving for me proved to be a somewhat protracted process. Admittedly, I am not familiar with your situation, so what I did may not be the best comparison. I am not sure what you mean by "dead end state". Is it possible to grit your teeth a bit longer and save up a bit of a "nest egg" before relocating, even if it involves a job(s) that isn't particularly interesting or relevant to what you know? If that's possible (even though unpalatable), it would also buy you some time while you apply for jobs in the area where you plan to relocate. I personally lined things up and made sure I had a job offer to accept in a new location before committing to turn in my notice at my current job and apartment complex. I have never personally "moved out of dodge" on a low budget (something easier said than done), but then again, I was in a different situation.

Rent being cheaper could depend on various circumstances. Hopefully it will translate into more savings for you if you manage to relocate, but on the other hand, lower rent could also be a result of lower average wages and benefits of that area as well.
Jobs are more plentiful, rent is absurd here. I mean like 1200 for a single bedroom in the country. There's no jobs up here and I fucking hate where I am. The weather, the environment, and just the bad memories. I need a fresh start because this place is making me hate all life.

the economy is dying here.
 

Ovidia Dragoness

Udder Derg
Banned
It looks more like a small depression. I can recommend you to take some vitamins https:// nootropicboost .com to stop it at this point :D They are good for the brain and thinking processes...
but, seriously, this situation is the same for many states and also for mine :(
Was that just next level spam botting? They're getting smarter...
 

Hound-of-chulainn

Well-Known Member
I don't have much experience with this, but I'm in a similar boat(although I never bothered getting my license), so far all I have planned is to pack light and head out via bus with enough savings for 3 month's rent and food, but the important thing is to try to look for work before you start your move, since you'll lose a lot of access to safety nets like friends and family depending on how far you move and that guarantee of employment would help alleviate that tremendously .
 

GreenZone

Banned
Banned
as ive said in the past i wanted to escape and for a sense of belonging and more to life so i joined the Army but what is it you're actually asking? is it how to save or are you asking how do you do that initial leap of faith cause once you do it opens up a new world for you trust me
 
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WithMyBearHands

Smudge and arrogant
Not really gonna bring you a lot of traditional success, but I’ve been thinking something similar for a while. Would love to just be a hobo (different from being homeless, shit sucked) and the only reason I don’t is for my wife. If it was just me, I’d be hopping towns and working odd jobs. It looks stupid when I type it but it sounds so good in my head.
 

Kellan Meig'h

Kilted Luthier
Well, here's the gray-muzzle approach to bugging out, cheaply. It takes a bit of planning and careful socking away of money, though. Figure out how you're going to support yourself once moved to the desired place, make sure you have a job waiting, not just an offer. Offers do fall through so be sure that job has a start date. Research where you're going to and have monies for rent, first and last or security deposit on what might be the highest rent you would pay. Also, have money to rent a motel for a few days to a week, too.

To prepare for that move, you will find it better to ditch most of the stuff you would take with you, keeping only the bare essentials. Like what fits in your car. Clothes, your most needed toiletries, basic dishes/pots and pans. Cast iron skillet, too if you have one. Your bedding/pillows would be good to take with you. Include the tools of your trade, if you use hand tools/meters/laptops, etc for employment. You can obtain whatever else you might need once you get to your destination. Be prepared to camp out in a motel for a week until you secure a place.

Other things to consider; Deposits for gas and electric. Changing over your drivers license and vehicle tags. Either moving your current banking situation or opening new accounts. Vehicle and renter's insurance. don't forget the fuel and meals for your trip.

Can you tell I've done this a time or two? Gonna do it again in October. 2,400 miles. Already have the home bought and paid for. I have family doing the painting and what-not for me.

Hope this gives you some perspective on moving.
 

Kuuro

Hey man, look at me rocking out!
Oh boy... I independently moved from Oregon to Texas when I was 19 to be with my significant other, and back to Oregon again when I was almost 21. The more stuff you have, the more expensive and difficult it is. BUT even with a full home of things, it can be done, if you're willing to put forth the effort. Work. A LOT, under any circumstance.

In Texas, my daily job was a 30-minute commute on the freeway one way, 26 miles from home. When I decided to move back to Oregon, I made a 6-month plan and got a second job as a delivery driver in Houston, which was 50 miles (about an hour) away from my home. I found a place to crash closer to both jobs, worked over 50 hours a week (upwards of 15 hours a day on several occasions!) and a few months later I had enough saved up to get back to my home state with two months' worth of rent to give me time to find new work. ALWAYS save extra. On the way back one night, one of my axles fell apart and I spent a day replacing it in an O'Reilly's parking lot. Had to spend a lot more cash than I wanted for the parts, a couple tools, and an unexpected hotel stay (or you can keep it cheap and sleep in the car, I did that a bunch too). When I had just enough to finally move, I was really tempted to just go. What was stopping me? What could possibly go wrong? A lot more than that DID go wrong, and I'm very happy I stuck it out for a couple extra months. Always plan for emergencies.

These days I'm so lazy though it kinda feels like I'm telling a story about someone else



EDIT: just saw you said the economy/jobs are garbage where you live. I can say the same for where I'm at now, it's hell. But depending on your level of determination, there's always something. Try working in a neighboring town if you have to, or odd jobs. Craigslist gigs. Cut any spending you can. It's always possible, but lack of one's willingness will often convince otherwise!
 
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Skychickens

Late Healer Ferret
I took what I had and hightailed it out of where I was. I’m not quite in the job I wanted (things happened) but for me at least everything has gotten better. I don’t spend all my free time and money in doctor offices or therapy appointments. I’m a walking stresscase but my irrational anxieties and depression are manageable. I have friends for the first time in ages and I’m getting married in under two weeks. My fiancée and I are working towards opening our own business. Things got better, even if we’ve had a lot of hardship since I ran off.

I say if you have the means, take the dive. It’s much better to try than regretting you never did.
 

DarkoKavinsky

ʎʇʇɐq ʇıq ɐ
Right now I'm juggling the aspect of predicting my financial needs. I have a few set things that I know, like payments towards debt.

The rest I'm unsure of.

Got a rough renting number I want to strive for 850 a month give or take.

So combined with my 254 a month for debt consolidation., Hmm..
 
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