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Autism in The Fandom

Ziv

PokéManiac
They did the same to me when I tried to buy my first gun, but the dealers got suspicious of me and called the FBI too look through all my socials to see if I said anything "bad". Which unfortunately I did but it was one sentence, out of sarcasm, and it was a couple years prior. But of course the paranoid keyboard warriors wouldn't have any of it. Now I have to wait 4 more years for the restriction to expire or move out of state.

I don't want a gun but I'm also legally barred from owning one for the next 5 years.
Mine will expire as well, but if it stacked cumulatively for each time I've been given this restriction it would be like 70 years lol
 

Parabellum3

I'm not a furry if I have feathers.
I don't want a gun but I'm also legally barred from owning one for the next 5 years.
Mine will expire as well, but if it stacked cumulatively for each time I've been given this restriction it would be like 70 years lol
Just move out of state and it won't apply any longer lol. But it sucks that I was trying my hardest to look "normal" but I still stood out. It made me quite sad to say the least.
 

Ziv

PokéManiac
Just move out of state and it won't apply any longer lol. But it sucks that I was trying my hardest to look "normal" but I still stood out. It made me quite sad to say the least.

I'm actually honestly not sure if it will work that way for me! I think I'm in some kind of federal database.
I'm sorry you went through that.
 

Parabellum3

I'm not a furry if I have feathers.
I'm actually honestly not sure if it will work that way for me! I think I'm in some kind of federal database.
I'm sorry you went through that.
I was in an ER for less than 24 hours since I explained the bullshit that they put me in to. If you went to a state hospital then your name will be recorded. And thanks, I'm sorry for you as well.
 

Ziv

PokéManiac
I was in an ER for less than 24 hours since I explained the bullshit that they put me in to. If you went to a state hospital then your name will be recorded. And thanks, I'm sorry for you as well.

I've been inpatient 18 times, sometimes for weeks or even months. *shrug* It is what it is. I just live my life the best I can.
 

Parabellum3

I'm not a furry if I have feathers.
I've been inpatient 18 times, sometimes for weeks or even months. *shrug* It is what it is. I just live my life the best I can.
That's why we need to research for more effective treatments and cures, so we can avoid THIS.
 

Firuthi Dragovic

Gamer Dragon, former speedrunner
I'm honestly a little confused. I'm making a rhetorical point that white people are inherently less concerned about getting killed by cops. Do you... disagree? Like, honestly I am confused.

EDIT: Also, that last point you made really should be made at Parabellum, imo. And where's the sympathy for me? I've spoken at length about my own disabilities in this thread and I've literally been called worthless to humanity... If I had any less restraint honestly I'd tell Parabellum right where he can stick his opinions.
After reading the posts you've made towards Parabellum since... it appears I 100% misread where you were going with your statements. I am EXCEPTIONALLY bad at reading rhetorical questions and seeing a race mention listed IMMEDIATELY after a comment about mentalizing LITERALLY looked to me at the time like an insult of ability. Spelling out how people have it better is one thing and is generally appropriate (but is VERY easy to do wrong), making sure to be sensitive about others' states is very appropriate, but insulting abilities is inappropriate. Now that I realize where you were ACTUALLY going with the question, sorry about the mixup there.

Based on my own interactions with cops? Yeah, I'm far less concerned and I can see how white people would be inherently less concerned. I think the last negativity I had with an officer was when I was pulled over last year for something like a taillight at night and he had one of the side beams staring RIGHT into my rear-view mirror... which was a sight overload. I endured it at the time and that interaction went peacefully, but that light's apparently a thing used for drunk drivers. This was a state cop, patrolling a rural area - basically, about as many calm circumstances as you could muster. That's as far as I'll go with that because I already know that the calm scenario is FAR rarer outside these very specific circumstances, even the calm scenario would be overshadowed by something I'm only going to call "lingering trauma", and it probably would run afoul of forum rules to go into ALL the depth and history of the issue.


As for "where's the sympathy"? I think at some point I'm going to have to have a long discussion about how utterly BAD I am at sympathy and emotions in general (I REALLY hope it's underdeveloped skills and not some actual comorbidity going on), but for the moment I'm going to tell you that the misread is probably the biggest factor in me being unsympathetic. You've been professional and direct about the whole autism thing and quite honest about your own state, so I think with the misread I just got caught completely off guard and tried to fall back on autism studies to defuse.

As for worthlessness? I had to reread the last few pages of conversation again to understand what was going on. Your restraint has honestly been... kinda astronomical given some of the massive spelling-out I've seen. You actually went to great lengths to directly answer why something is offensive and I have a lot of respect for that, because I don't see that NEARLY ENOUGH either on the Internet or in public spaces. Giving up would have been understandable. I tried to leave the whole thing alone and let it play out. But now that I think about it? In addition to the misread, I think my glossing over you being called worthless might also be because I interpreted the matter as settled. You stood up for yourself when it happened. I understood that as the end of that specific issue.

If there's anything else I need to address about the situation, please let me know.
 
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Ziv

PokéManiac
After reading the posts you've made towards Parabellum since... it appears I 100% misread where you were going with your statements. I am EXCEPTIONALLY bad at reading rhetorical questions and seeing a race mention listed IMMEDIATELY after a comment about mentalizing LITERALLY looked to me at the time like an insult of ability. Spelling out how people have it better is one thing and is generally appropriate (but is VERY easy to do wrong), making sure to be sensitive about others' states is very appropriate, but insulting abilities is inappropriate. Now that I realize where you were ACTUALLY going with the question, sorry about the mixup there.

Based on my own interactions with cops? Yeah, I'm far less concerned and I can see how white people would be inherently less concerned. I think the last negativity I had with an officer was when I was pulled over last year for something like a taillight at night and he had one of the side beams staring RIGHT into my rear-view mirror... which was a sight overload. I endured it at the time and that interaction went peacefully, but that light's apparently a thing used for drunk drivers. This was a state cop, patrolling a rural area - basically, about as many calm circumstances as you could muster. That's as far as I'll go with that because I already know that the calm scenario is FAR rarer outside these very specific circumstances, even the calm scenario would be overshadowed by something I'm only going to call "lingering trauma", and it probably would run afoul of forum rules to go into ALL the depth and history of the issue.


As for "where's the sympathy"? I think at some point I'm going to have to have a long discussion about how utterly BAD I am at sympathy and emotions in general (I REALLY hope it's underdeveloped skills and not some actual comorbidity going on), but for the moment I'm going to tell you that the misread is probably the biggest factor in me being unsympathetic. You've been professional and direct about the whole autism thing and quite honest about your own state, so I think with the misread I just got caught completely off guard and tried to fall back on autism studies to defuse.

As for worthlessness? I had to reread the last few pages of conversation again to understand what was going on. Your restraint has honestly been... kinda astronomical given some of the massive spelling-out I've seen. You actually went to great lengths to directly answer why something is offensive and I have a lot of respect for that, because I don't see that NEARLY ENOUGH either on the Internet or in public spaces. Giving up would have been understandable. I tried to leave the whole thing alone and let it play out. But now that I think about it? In addition to the misread, I think my glossing over you being called worthless might also be because I interpreted the matter as settled. You stood up for yourself when it happened. I understood that as the end of that specific issue.

If there's anything else I need to address about the situation, please let me know.

I know you know this based on your reply, but as to this last paragraph I just want to reiterate that me having very high verbal intelligence (which I do -- 99th percentile score on GRE verbal, twice, and that's only for graduate students) doesn't mean I'm not affected by being called worthless to humanity because of my disabilities (and in that case, OP seemed to be directing his anger specifically at disabilities HE DOES NOT HAVE, as I spelled out --- nobody hears "sound of mind" and "danger to self and others" and says "oh, autism" -- they obviously think psychosis) -- and it's not "settled" just because one person stood up and said it wasn't cool. Yeah, I'm used to it because a huge chunk of people in the world buy into stigma like that and I experience it every day, but...
 

MCtheBeardie

Queen of Laziness
Man, who would have guessed that a community where people dress up like autistic animals would be full of speds?
I unironically laughed at this, I’m sorry. :’)

I didn’t mean to, but I did!
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
Because autism in particular comes with a notable collection of strengths, I'd say, and because you might as well embrace it or come to terms with it in some form, because it's an inescapable part of you.

At the same time, it's valid and appropriate to also acknowledge the struggles, deficits, and pains that come with being autistic, too, and to grieve the losses and disappointments one has endured as a result.

I think this was a useful comment and I'm going to make an effort to say 'diagnosis' instead of 'disorder' in the future.
 

Troj

Your Friendly Neighborhood Dino Therapist
I think this was a useful comment and I'm going to make an effort to say 'diagnosis' instead of 'disorder' in the future.

By all means, continue to say "Autism Spectrum Disorder," because that's what it's called :)---but, yeah, when talking about autism generally, I've started to lean towards calling it a "neurotype." I will sometimes call it a disability or disorder if the focus of the conversation is on how autistic people struggle and the accommodations that can help.

I'd say, at the very least, don't refer to it as a mental illness.
 

Troj

Your Friendly Neighborhood Dino Therapist
Is it because it sounds less “offensive”?
Sure---but even more importantly, I think words help to prime people's assumptions and expectations.

If autism is only framed as something to be loathed, pitied, or feared, then that will often lead to autistic people being loathed, pitied, and feared, and their strengths and skills being missed or misinterpreted.
 

Parabellum3

I'm not a furry if I have feathers.
Sure---but even more importantly, I think words help to prime people's assumptions and expectations.

If autism is only framed as something to be loathed, pitied, or feared, then that will often lead to autistic people being loathed, pitied, and feared, and their strengths and skills being missed or misinterpreted.
I personally don't think that'll make any difference whatsoever because everyone still knows what it is. Plus I would not argue with the medical community either since any form of psychiatric illnesses is defined by the chemical imbalance in the brain.
 

Troj

Your Friendly Neighborhood Dino Therapist
I personally don't think that'll make any difference whatsoever because everyone still knows what it is. Plus I would not argue with the medical community either since any form of psychiatric illnesses is defined by the chemical imbalance in the brain.

I wouldn't say "everyone" knows what it is, having come across plenty of people (including clinicians) whose understanding of autism is still stuck in the 80s at least.

This also isn't about "arguing" with the medical community--especially since the medical community isn't in perfect agreement on these matters, either---but rather, about looking at "different kinds of brains" from varied perspectives.

Also, it's not all about chemical imbalances, as structural abnormalities/differences and brain damage can cause mental disorders and other neurological issues, too.
 
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Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
I wouldn't say "everyone" knows what it is, having come across plenty of people (including clinicians) whose understanding of autism is still stuck in the 80s at least.

This also isn't about "arguing" with the medical community--especially since the medical community isn't in perfect agreement on these matters, either---but rather, about looking at "different kinds of brains" from varied perspectives.

Also, it's not all about chemical imbalances, as structural abnormalities/differences and brain damage can cause mental disorders and other neurological issues, too.

Personal story- I had a brain scan when I was 22 because of uncontrollable passing out, and structural abnormalities was precisely what they were looking for.

It turned out I had a perfectly normal juicy brain. (and I think I was just over-working at the time and this was the cause of the trouble!)
 

Yakamaru

Level 32 Knight
By all means, continue to say "Autism Spectrum Disorder," because that's what it's called :)---but, yeah, when talking about autism generally, I've started to lean towards calling it a "neurotype." I will sometimes call it a disability or disorder if the focus of the conversation is on how autistic people struggle and the accommodations that can help.

I'd say, at the very least, don't refer to it as a mental illness.
What accommodations are you referring to? I am curious to know.
 

Troj

Your Friendly Neighborhood Dino Therapist
Aha! Great question.

Well, for starters, lots of autistic people have a preferred sensory modality when it comes to absorbing, understanding, remembering, and/or communicating information, and a sensory modality in which they are less strong. So, one work or academic accommodation might require that the autistic person be provided with written instructions on important tasks, for example, instead of just being told things verbally.

Autistic people often benefit from accommodations that allow them to take breaks, especially when they feel themselves approaching shutdown or meltdown.

Autistic people often benefit from being allowed to have a stim toy that allows them to fiddle with their hands to keep them focused and calm.

Autistic people may benefit from sensory accommodations in their environment that allow them to study or work someplace that will be quiet, lightly-lit, or less distracting.

Autistic people often benefit from more clear, consistent, and structured instructions, expectations, and schedules.

Autistic people may also benefit from accommodations like extra time on assignments and tests.

Broadly, just realizing that the person in front of you may need time to process new events or information, may be bothered by strong sensory input, and may start to behave in certain ways when they get overwhelmed or overstimulated can be helpful for all parties involved.
 

Parabellum3

I'm not a furry if I have feathers.
I wouldn't say "everyone" knows what it is, having come across plenty of people (including clinicians) whose understanding of autism is still stuck in the 80s at least.

This also isn't about "arguing" with the medical community--especially since the medical community isn't in perfect agreement on these matters, either---but rather, about looking at "different kinds of brains" from varied perspectives.

Also, it's not all about chemical imbalances, as structural abnormalities/differences and brain damage can cause mental disorders and other neurological issues, too.
I suppose that even if you exclude boomers, people today are more informed of autism but still eye the downsides the most than the upsides of it. If there are any that is.

And by “structural abnormalities”, are you referring to genetics or something else?
 

Troj

Your Friendly Neighborhood Dino Therapist
Structural abnormalities, as in, the brain itself looks different on, say, a CAT, MRI, or similar scan, for example.

I'd say younger people are perhaps more savvy than older people, and urban people may be more savvy than rural people when it comes to knowing about autism---but, misconceptions still abound. In particular, their own stereotypes and assumptions may cause them to misinterpret or miss signs in autism in women and ethnic/racial minorities.
 
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Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
I suppose that even if you exclude boomers, people today are more informed of autism but still eye the downsides the most than the upsides of it. If there are any that is.

And by “structural abnormalities”, are you referring to genetics or something else?

The cause of autism is complex and not fully understood.
'structural abnormality' here refers to the fact that the connections between brain cells and brain-regions can be different in the brain of somebody with autism, compared with a typical brain.
 

Troj

Your Friendly Neighborhood Dino Therapist
Correct, Fallowfox! One hypothesis (among many) is that when autistic people's brains undergo the normal neuronal pruning around age 2, their brain doesn't prune away extraneous connections in the usual way.
 

RileyTheOtter

The Autistic Otter
I should check this site more often. Bit late on the topic, but I agree with Ziv and Firuthi that a medical bracelet (or similar item) indicating a diagnosis may not be the worst idea. I know I could definitely have a need for one if I ever have a meltdown down like I used to when I was a teenager, having one or not may be the difference between my surviving the meltdown or being killed because of it if what I have been told about my past meltdowns are even half true.
 

Firuthi Dragovic

Gamer Dragon, former speedrunner
Okay, so time to breach a topic about one of the traits that appears to show up a lot in the autism spectrum, and in fact shows up quite a bit in the general population as well. At least, if you believe the literature. It's also one of those traits that's probably a source of the "uncaring" or "emotionless" stereotypes so associated with autism.

It's been touched on a tiny bit in the thread already, just not by name. So I might as well address it proper.

I speak of something called "alexithymia", which is basically the inability to identify and describe emotions. Not just your own, but others' as well.

It's not a proper clinical diagnosis, at least not yet.

I suspect I've got this one in spades. I see so many discussions where people try to club it into the other person to see their viewpoint, but any attempt to read their heart just.... fails with me. I'd have better luck trying to pick diamonds out of their words than try to catch the emotion tying them together.

(I know I come off as a joker with what I said but I'm serious - other than fear and anger I have serious difficulties reading even my OWN emotions, and reading others' is just not plausible. It's made my last few attempts at therapy difficult as I quite literally can't describe much of what I'm feeling - I pretty much had to go with getting a grasp of my own condition instead.)

Some people who've seen some of my past posts might remember some of my... unusual stances on things (self-interest, greed, etc.). I'm guessing at this point they're attempts to bypass my lack of recognition of emotion. It's not a perfect fix, but I recognize at this point I may not HAVE the option of a larger fix and I'm just trying to go with what I've got.
 

Lady Anubis

New Member
I think this was a useful comment and I'm going to make an effort to say 'diagnosis' instead of 'disorder' in the future.
I agree with what you just said to the qoute you were replying too. I myself have an Autism Spectrum Disability. I am open to share it so that others dont judge me right off the bat and detour from me. I do need friends.
 
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