• Fur Affinity Forums are governed by Fur Affinity's Rules and Policies. Links and additional information can be accessed in the Site Information Forum.

Autism in The Fandom

Yakamaru

Level 32 Knight
Another good reason for a cure would be that people will for once consider that you have met the requirements for you to be considered “normal” according to society’s definition. You’ll certainly be more respected and you won’t unintentionally creep people out.
And what is "society" defined as? Your parents? Your friends?
 

Yakamaru

Level 32 Knight
Basically anyone you interact with. Strangers, classmates, colleagues in my case have been a problem in the past and still is.
Aaaand they matter.. Why, exactly?

Why are you chasing other people's expectations rather than setting your own?
 

Lucyfur

United forever in friendship and labour
Banned
I kinda get what you’re saying but like idk I find that it gives unique insight and outlooks being fringed of society due to not being able to follow socializing and social norms of others.

also tbh autism is what gave me before I eventually broke from lack of mental care for other things I have going on in my noggin a great boost in my job as an analyst in the navy since my hyperfixating and ability to store information after glancing at it once really made me a bit advantaged and to this day those skills help me with general life and passions I pursue and some side freelance work.
 

Parabellum3

I'm not a furry if I have feathers.
Aaaand they matter.. Why, exactly?

Why are you chasing other people's expectations rather than setting your own?
We are social creatures you know? It’s hard to survive in this world by doing absolutely everything on your own. You need to collaborate with others and they need to collaborate with you in order to get somewhere in life (which is unfortunate imo). Otherwise you’ll just become nothing.
 

Parabellum3

I'm not a furry if I have feathers.
I kinda get what you’re saying but like idk I find that it gives unique insight and outlooks being fringed of society due to not being able to follow socializing and social norms of others.

also tbh autism is what gave me before I eventually broke from lack of mental care for other things I have going on in my noggin a great boost in my job as an analyst in the navy since my hyperfixating and ability to store information after glancing at it once really made me a bit advantaged and to this day those skills help me with general life and passions I pursue and some side freelance work.
It’s true that being on the spectrum can give you some advantages (though it’s random) however the usefulness of these advantages won’t last long and aren’t the usual basic necessities of having a successful life, socially and/or physically.
 

Yakamaru

Level 32 Knight
We are social creatures you know? It’s hard to survive in this world by doing absolutely everything on your own. You need to collaborate with others and they need to collaborate with you in order to get somewhere in life (which is unfortunate imo). Otherwise you’ll just become nothing.
Chasing terms/boundaries and expectations that someone else have of you will end up in a never-ending circle. Not letting someone else set the terms of your person is paramount if you ever want to reach even a modicum of happiness. Just because we're a social species doesn't mean one should chase after someone else's expectations/terms. Happiness isn't really achieved through trying to appease others.

Rule number 1: You can't please everyone, and it's futile to even try in the first place.
 

Parabellum3

I'm not a furry if I have feathers.
Chasing terms/boundaries and expectations that someone else have of you will end up in a never-ending circle. Not letting someone else set the terms of your person is paramount if you ever want to reach even a modicum of happiness. Just because we're a social species doesn't mean one should chase after someone else's expectations/terms. Happiness isn't really achieved through trying to appease others.

Rule number 1: You can't please everyone, and it's futile to even try in the first place.
Indeed you can’t, however having a disorder that impairs your social skills or intelligence will certainly make it a lot harder to please people in general. Even those who are “open and are positive.”
 

Lucyfur

United forever in friendship and labour
Banned
Tbh I’m like idk scared of terms like cure when it is something that isn’t really curable like sure we can teach certain skills to make socializing more easy and smooth but a cure just it scares me because like...
it’s not something that is broken in me that needs fixing like I don’t feel inherently wrong because of my autism sure I may feel wrong socially but that’s not my autism doing that it is imposed social bs.

I say this from the frame of I do have things that make me feel or have made me feel inherently wrong that I have been feeling less wrong about as I’ve gotten treatment for them.
 

Yakamaru

Level 32 Knight
Indeed you can’t, however having a disorder that impairs your social skills or intelligence will certainly make it a lot harder to please people in general. Even those who are “open and are positive.”
That's the problem right there. You are going around trying to please people. Just.. Stop. It's one of the factors that are causing so many problems in the first place. Yes having Autism will provide challenges with your social skills, and the bigger the challenge the harder they are to overcome. But that doesn't mean you should go chasing after something of which you will never be able to achieve in the first place.

Learning to adapt to society enough doesn't mean you have to sacrifice who you are. If you are that dissatisfied with who you are then embrace change. For that to be a possibility to occur you need introspection/self-reflection.

Even more importantly, start taking action. If I didn't take action the way I did I'd be stuck in a never-ending cycle of misery.
 

KD142000

Leather-clad Lobo
I'm not sure whether it's possible to cure it or not. Do we need/should we cure it is another matter that's up for debate.

I'm of the belief there's no such thing as 'normal' cos humans are weird even if they are considered normal. Even if you removed autism from the equation entirely, you can still have issues communicating from trauma or just a lack of social interaction from a young age.

I'm not sure what's in my head or if I'm on the spectrum. If I was, I wouldn't be surprised. But I don't look for answers there, mostly because I've accepted that I had a shit time of it for one reason or another. To me, doesn't really matter what the reason was. It just sucked and can't be undone. It's up to me to grow as a person, get help if I need it and stop worrying about fitting into a normal that doesn't exist.
 

Parabellum3

I'm not a furry if I have feathers.
Tbh I’m like idk scared of terms like cure when it is something that isn’t really curable like sure we can teach certain skills to make socializing more easy and smooth but a cure just it scares me because like...
it’s not something that is broken in me that needs fixing like I don’t feel inherently wrong because of my autism sure I may feel wrong socially but that’s not my autism doing that it is imposed social bs.

I say this from the frame of I do have things that make me feel or have made me feel inherently wrong that I have been feeling less wrong about as I’ve gotten treatment for them.
Been to like 3 different social groups and nothing changed for me. And if someone were to call for volunteers for like a beta testing of a cure, I’d sign up first. Heck I may become the first man in history to be cured lol (assuming everything goes well of course).

That's the problem right there. You are going around trying to please people. Just.. Stop. It's one of the factors that are causing so many problems in the first place. Yes having Autism will provide challenges with your social skills, and the bigger the challenge the harder they are to overcome. But that doesn't mean you should go chasing after something of which you will never be able to achieve in the first place.

Learning to adapt to society enough doesn't mean you have to sacrifice who you are. If you are that dissatisfied with who you are then embrace change. For that to be a possibility to occur you need introspection/self-reflection.

Even more importantly, start taking action. If I didn't take action the way I did I'd be stuck in a never-ending cycle of misery.
That’s another roadblock from Autism, change. It’s hard for me to break out of my routine mainly out of fear or god knows what else is in my head. That is who I am, and I don’t like it. And so far the most effective way for me to change is from external influence. A notable example being a friend who introduced me to the fandom, no way in hell to would be here if it weren’t for them. Same goes for a cure...


I'm not sure whether it's possible to cure it or not. Do we need/should we cure it is another matter that's up for debate.

I'm of the belief there's no such thing as 'normal' cos humans are weird even if they are considered normal. Even if you removed autism from the equation entirely, you can still have issues communicating from trauma or just a lack of social interaction from a young age.

I'm not sure what's in my head or if I'm on the spectrum. If I was, I wouldn't be surprised. But I don't look for answers there, mostly because I've accepted that I had a shit time of it for one reason or another. To me, doesn't really matter what the reason was. It just sucked and can't be undone. It's up to me to grow as a person, get help if I need it and stop worrying about fitting into a normal that doesn't exist.
It’s true that there is no absolute definition of “normal” when it comes to people. But I’d least wish to not be labeled as “sick”, “weird”, “psychopath”, “creepy”, etc anymore.
 

KD142000

Leather-clad Lobo
It’s true that there is no absolute definition of “normal” when it comes to people. But I’d least wish to not be labeled as “sick”, “weird”, “psychopath”, “creepy”, etc anymore.
If you're not any of those things, I don't see any reason why their opinion should matter. If someone came at me with those accusations, all I'd think is how wrong they are and how they aren't worth my time.
 

Yakamaru

Level 32 Knight
It’s true that there is no absolute definition of “normal” when it comes to people. But I’d least wish to not be labeled as “sick”, “weird”, “psychopath”, “creepy”, etc anymore.
And these people should be ignored and cut out of your life if they intend on keeping you down. You're being pushed around by people who seek to control you let alone try and manipulate you through those words.

Better to not get affected by words and steer your own ship in a direction that you are happy with.
 

Liseran Thistle

They/Them
(i wanna say somethin cause I have autism lol)

Autism isn't something that needs to be "cured" because pointedly there's nothing really "wrong" with people who have autism. They just have a tougher way of understanding other people socially to varying levels, and most of society caters to Allistic people rather than Autistic people. Like the school system, workplace environments, etc.

Autistic people can certainly live and thrive in an allistic world, and they shouldn't be "cured" of their disability mainly because the reasons their condition is even considered a disability is because of the things people who don't have autism haven't done.

The world has advanced without any consideration for our needs, and so some of us are "disabled" even though it's not really our fault. Imagine for a second that randomly one day, everyone but you had the ability to fly. You get a little sad by the thought you can't fly, but nothing really changes in your life, so you go about your day as a flightless person. However, soon you notice that they start to add buildings and structures that only people who can fly can get to or reach.

You need to get to school, but you can't because there are no stairs, and the door is 50ft in the air. You are now technically disabled because you can't do something that everyone else can, and it's by no consequence of your own, the world around you has just not taken into consideration people *like* you.

I see it that way, as in the world hasn't really thought about how an autistic person like me could do well in school, or loud places, or a work environment. And it's not just autistic people who have to sort of deal with this, people with all kinds of disabilities.

Blind people, people in wheelchairs, Deaf people, etc all are disabled but really only because there aren't a lot of things available to help them do things a non-disabled person could do. There aren't a lot of interpreters for deaf people or words on a prompter in places for them to read along. Some places don't have braille on their signs to help the blind find where they need to go. There might not be a ramp for a person in a wheelchair to get to a certain place, etc.

And while these are all disabilities that can technically be cured, autism is a different case because it's not really a physical disability it's one that's in the brain. It's something that can easily be helped and fixed, or "cured" if the world around us just changed in slightly different ways to accommodate for people who have it. The only real way to 'treat" autism is to make changes around the person who has it, not to the person themself.

The *real* issue with autism isn't autistic people, it's people not wanting to change a few things *for* autistic people, and refusing to make accommodations for them because they think we're odd or strange, or "dumb". That is what we call "ableism", and it's very toxic and awful. It's the reason some people don't tell others they're autistic for fear people might judge them, and it's also the reason some autistic people feel they need a "cure" for their condition. Because they don't fit in, and some parts of society are refusing to make accommodations.
 

contemplationistwolf

The Restless Maverick
I've been diagnosed with Asperger's myself, and life with it has definitely not been easy ...
They say "you should just be yourself", but it's kinda hard to do that when you always get punished for it, and since an early age. I come from a very competitive and judgemental (and also homophobic) environment, one where I constantly got compared to others, where I had to "be normal, do this, achieve that", one that had no understanding of what Asperger's/Autism is and had no positive regard for such differences. I never fit in anywhere despite trying, so my youth was constant ostracization and conflicts even with a lot of self-inhibition. Conflicts I could handle though; what felt much worse was the persistent isolation: the feeling that there's no place for me, that no-one understands me or is on my side.

Because my social experiences had such a lack of positivity, I became very avoidant over time, and it's been taking a lot of effort to break out of that. I've spent my whole life repressing myself, accommodating others, and trying to live up to high expectations with no support and a lot of mental baggage to deal with. It did lead to me losing touch with myself, and I've been spending the last year working to fix that.

Ugh ... this dourness and self-pity is kinda annoying to re-read, but suppose I already wrote it, and might be useful to share the experiences regardless.

I've made good progress fixing the effects my youth had. I understand myself better now, am less avoidant and have friends with whom I have things in common. I'm really good at mathematics and I managed to turn that to my advantage, thus I ended up doing outwardly fairly well despite no support and a lot of internal baggage. Despite the challenges I faced, I'm proud of who I am and wouldn't want to be anyone else.

This world is not a fair place and it never will be. Some have to work extra hard to get what others simply get handed to them. Occasional self-pity and whining can be cathartic I guess, but remember that the world doesn't give a shit. You can either keep whining or rise up to the challenge, and the second choice is frankly the only productive one.

Perhaps all this extra work to get what others take for granted will help build character. Perhaps this extra thought that it requires to fit in will let you see what the world is truly like and help build greater wisdom. Perhaps all these challenges will make you a stronger person, and once you catch up to others, you'll keep on racing right past them.
 

Cockynoob666

Im a noob?
Banned
oh I tried, but it ALWAYS FUCKING FAILS, LIKE COME ON, I LITERALY HAVE TO GO OUT OF MY WAY FOR THE SLIGHTEST TINYEST CHANCE THAT IT WILL GO WELL, IT DOESNT, ONE TIME ONLY IT WORKS, YEAH ITS 1 % FULL BUT ITS JUST 1 PERCENT! SO WHY BOTHER. AT THAT POINT YOU MAY KNOW THAT THE WORLD THINKS YOUR USELESS A WASTE SO JUST END YOUR SUFFERING BY DYING
 

ASTA

Former Trash Man
oh I tried, but it ALWAYS FUCKING FAILS, LIKE COME ON, I LITERALY HAVE TO GO OUT OF MY WAY FOR THE SLIGHTEST TINYEST CHANCE THAT IT WILL GO WELL, IT DOESNT, ONE TIME ONLY IT WORKS, YEAH ITS 1 % FULL BUT ITS JUST 1 PERCENT! SO WHY BOTHER. AT THAT POINT YOU MAY KNOW THAT THE WORLD THINKS YOUR USELESS A WASTE SO JUST END YOUR SUFFERING BY DYING

Only certain people will get it.
 

Guifrog

Blue Frog
I would just like to add, not every autistic person is the same, and not everybody has specific talents, so we should be careful to considerate the story of each individual

That said, one of my aspie friends has found his groove through performing arts. One would probably think this is incompatible with the common sense about the matter, but he managed to gain confidence through something that encourages self-expression and a group of people who deeply care for him
 

Yakamaru

Level 32 Knight
I've been diagnosed with Asperger's myself, and life with it has definitely not been easy ...
They say "you should just be yourself", but it's kinda hard to do that when you always get punished for it, and since an early age. I come from a very competitive and judgemental (and also homophobic) environment, one where I constantly got compared to others, where I had to "be normal, do this, achieve that", one that had no understanding of what Asperger's/Autism is and had no positive regard for such differences. I never fit in anywhere despite trying, so my youth was constant ostracization and conflicts even with a lot of self-inhibition. Conflicts I could handle though; what felt much worse was the persistent isolation: the feeling that there's no place for me, that no-one understands me or is on my side.

Because my social experiences had such a lack of positivity, I became very avoidant over time, and it's been taking a lot of effort to break out of that. I've spent my whole life repressing myself, accommodating others, and trying to live up to high expectations with no support and a lot of mental baggage to deal with. It did lead to me losing touch with myself, and I've been spending the last year working to fix that.

Ugh ... this dourness and self-pity is kinda annoying to re-read, but suppose I already wrote it, and might be useful to share the experiences regardless.

I've made good progress fixing the effects my youth had. I understand myself better now, am less avoidant and have friends with whom I have things in common. I'm really good at mathematics and I managed to turn that to my advantage, thus I ended up doing outwardly fairly well despite no support and a lot of internal baggage. Despite the challenges I faced, I'm proud of who I am and wouldn't want to be anyone else.

This world is not a fair place and it never will be. Some have to work extra hard to get what others simply get handed to them. Occasional self-pity and whining can be cathartic I guess, but remember that the world doesn't give a shit. You can either keep whining or rise up to the challenge, and the second choice is frankly the only productive one.

Perhaps all this extra work to get what others take for granted will help build character. Perhaps this extra thought that it requires to fit in will let you see what the world is truly like and help build greater wisdom. Perhaps all these challenges will make you a stronger person, and once you catch up to others, you'll keep on racing right past them.
*hugs*
 

Parabellum3

I'm not a furry if I have feathers.
(i wanna say somethin cause I have autism lol)

Autism isn't something that needs to be "cured" because pointedly there's nothing really "wrong" with people who have autism. They just have a tougher way of understanding other people socially to varying levels, and most of society caters to Allistic people rather than Autistic people. Like the school system, workplace environments, etc.

Autistic people can certainly live and thrive in an allistic world, and they shouldn't be "cured" of their disability mainly because the reasons their condition is even considered a disability is because of the things people who don't have autism haven't done.

The world has advanced without any consideration for our needs, and so some of us are "disabled" even though it's not really our fault. Imagine for a second that randomly one day, everyone but you had the ability to fly. You get a little sad by the thought you can't fly, but nothing really changes in your life, so you go about your day as a flightless person. However, soon you notice that they start to add buildings and structures that only people who can fly can get to or reach.

You need to get to school, but you can't because there are no stairs, and the door is 50ft in the air. You are now technically disabled because you can't do something that everyone else can, and it's by no consequence of your own, the world around you has just not taken into consideration people *like* you.

I see it that way, as in the world hasn't really thought about how an autistic person like me could do well in school, or loud places, or a work environment. And it's not just autistic people who have to sort of deal with this, people with all kinds of disabilities.

Blind people, people in wheelchairs, Deaf people, etc all are disabled but really only because there aren't a lot of things available to help them do things a non-disabled person could do. There aren't a lot of interpreters for deaf people or words on a prompter in places for them to read along. Some places don't have braille on their signs to help the blind find where they need to go. There might not be a ramp for a person in a wheelchair to get to a certain place, etc.

And while these are all disabilities that can technically be cured, autism is a different case because it's not really a physical disability it's one that's in the brain. It's something that can easily be helped and fixed, or "cured" if the world around us just changed in slightly different ways to accommodate for people who have it. The only real way to 'treat" autism is to make changes around the person who has it, not to the person themself.

The *real* issue with autism isn't autistic people, it's people not wanting to change a few things *for* autistic people, and refusing to make accommodations for them because they think we're odd or strange, or "dumb". That is what we call "ableism", and it's very toxic and awful. It's the reason some people don't tell others they're autistic for fear people might judge them, and it's also the reason some autistic people feel they need a "cure" for their condition. Because they don't fit in, and some parts of society are refusing to make accommodations.
Ironically, some call me an ablest just because I look at the reality of things in our circumstances.
I've been diagnosed with Asperger's myself, and life with it has definitely not been easy ...
They say "you should just be yourself", but it's kinda hard to do that when you always get punished for it, and since an early age. I come from a very competitive and judgemental (and also homophobic) environment, one where I constantly got compared to others, where I had to "be normal, do this, achieve that", one that had no understanding of what Asperger's/Autism is and had no positive regard for such differences. I never fit in anywhere despite trying, so my youth was constant ostracization and conflicts even with a lot of self-inhibition. Conflicts I could handle though; what felt much worse was the persistent isolation: the feeling that there's no place for me, that no-one understands me or is on my side.

Because my social experiences had such a lack of positivity, I became very avoidant over time, and it's been taking a lot of effort to break out of that. I've spent my whole life repressing myself, accommodating others, and trying to live up to high expectations with no support and a lot of mental baggage to deal with. It did lead to me losing touch with myself, and I've been spending the last year working to fix that.

Ugh ... this dourness and self-pity is kinda annoying to re-read, but suppose I already wrote it, and might be useful to share the experiences regardless.

I've made good progress fixing the effects my youth had. I understand myself better now, am less avoidant and have friends with whom I have things in common. I'm really good at mathematics and I managed to turn that to my advantage, thus I ended up doing outwardly fairly well despite no support and a lot of internal baggage. Despite the challenges I faced, I'm proud of who I am and wouldn't want to be anyone else.

This world is not a fair place and it never will be. Some have to work extra hard to get what others simply get handed to them. Occasional self-pity and whining can be cathartic I guess, but remember that the world doesn't give a shit. You can either keep whining or rise up to the challenge, and the second choice is frankly the only productive one.

Perhaps all this extra work to get what others take for granted will help build character. Perhaps this extra thought that it requires to fit in will let you see what the world is truly like and help build greater wisdom. Perhaps all these challenges will make you a stronger person, and once you catch up to others, you'll keep on racing right past them.
I kinda was the same, except in my case I used to be very social in person but now it's the other way around, though when this Covid mess is over I'll try to interact with people in person. However, a cure will still be a helpful assist nevertheless, assuming it will work...
 

Firuthi Dragovic

Gamer Dragon, former speedrunner
The *real* issue with autism isn't autistic people, it's people not wanting to change a few things *for* autistic people, and refusing to make accommodations for them because they think we're odd or strange, or "dumb". That is what we call "ableism", and it's very toxic and awful. It's the reason some people don't tell others they're autistic for fear people might judge them, and it's also the reason some autistic people feel they need a "cure" for their condition. Because they don't fit in, and some parts of society are refusing to make accommodations.
Ableism, huh? I'll just put this on the table that I was quite an athlete growing up and given the competitive nature of the sports I was in, I can almost guarantee I wound up with a little ableism of my own just from that. I've never seen anyone use the phrase in-person though.

While I'd never actually use the term myself because it feels hollow (I would rather spell out what's wrong and have what's wrong spelled out to me - even if I can't take it the first time I'm called out. Change takes time), the tendency of my brain to take phrases literally winds up making other disadvantaged groups' activism look ableist to me. That, oversensitive hearing, rumination issues (uh, that's basically a mental feedback loop of repeating the situation in my head over and over until I snap), and knowing how ordinary people treat a total meltdown kind of pit me against a lot of the activist culture in general. So often I see efforts to tie their problems to mine (I think the term is "intersectionality") and yet no one considers what the consequences of one of my missteps will have for them in return.
 

Liseran Thistle

They/Them
Ironically, some call me an ablest just because I look at the reality of things in our circumstances.

I kinda was the same, except in my case I used to be very social in person but now it's the other way around, though when this Covid mess is over I'll try to interact with people in person. However, a cure will still be a helpful assist nevertheless, assuming it will work...

Ableism, huh? I'll just put this on the table that I was quite an athlete growing up and given the competitive nature of the sports I was in, I can almost guarantee I wound up with a little ableism of my own just from that. I've never seen anyone use the phrase in-person though.

While I'd never actually use the term myself because it feels hollow (I would rather spell out what's wrong and have what's wrong spelled out to me - even if I can't take it the first time I'm called out. Change takes time), the tendency of my brain to take phrases literally winds up making other disadvantaged groups' activism look ableist to me. That, oversensitive hearing, rumination issues (uh, that's basically a mental feedback loop of repeating the situation in my head over and over until I snap), and knowing how ordinary people treat a total meltdown kind of pit me against a lot of the activist culture in general. So often I see efforts to tie their problems to mine (I think the term is "intersectionality") and yet no one considers what the consequences of one of my missteps will have for them in return.

I kind of feel like people just sort of ignored everything I said and centered around the word "ableist".
 

Firuthi Dragovic

Gamer Dragon, former speedrunner
I kind of feel like people just sort of ignored everything I said and centered around the word "ableist".
Hard to say. I refuse to believe disabled people can't be ableist towards each other and that's kind of what led to my side rant.

I think the issue with me reading what you said is... aside from using the "everyone else is flying" analogy, everything winds up a repeat of things I've already known or seen. I've run into the "it's not a physical disability" problem when trying to get assistance once because I "didn't look autistic", I've actually had to help a blind student because their college's web system doesn't cater well to blind people, I even helped build a ramp once because I had guests in wheelchairs (and it takes TONS of space to make a ramp that meets regulations - 12 feet per 1 foot of elevation). Heck, even that "ableism" diversion I just made is an example of how the world doesn't see things the way I do. I've seen too much, firsthand, of how the world isn't designed around people who don't perfectly fit a norm and I'm technically one of the luckier ones.

And few people with the condition have access to the ladders needed. (With the sizes you cite I refer to "ladders" rather than your mentions of stairs because ladders take up less space and some can even be moved pretty well - my understanding is we're not asking for much.) I spent years in misery because it felt like the ladders got yanked out from under me, whereas a lot of people DON'T HAVE THEM AT ALL.

"Golden rule" isn't exactly perfect for dealing with others all the time, but I figured I'd at least attempt to be clear with you because I get frustrated when I get blown by like this as well. That said, my answer is limited by some of my issues with literal meaning so feel free to ask anything else.
 
Last edited:

Yakamaru

Level 32 Knight
The *real* issue with autism isn't autistic people, it's people not wanting to change a few things *for* autistic people, and refusing to make accommodations for them because they think we're odd or strange, or "dumb". That is what we call "ableism", and it's very toxic and awful. It's the reason some people don't tell others they're autistic for fear people might judge them, and it's also the reason some autistic people feel they need a "cure" for their condition. Because they don't fit in, and some parts of society are refusing to make accommodations.
We are a minority. We are outside of the norm due to having Autism. Society is under no obligation to cater to nor accommodate to our needs, because said needs may require people to go out of their way to accommodate us. Believing society or for that matter specific people are under any obligation to cater to or accommodate you is self-entitlement/narcissism. Not to mention people come off as wanting to be treated differently/in a special manner doesn't help you nor others either for that matter. You adapt to society, not the other way around. The more adapted you are the better. Refusal on your part to adapt even partially is not going to get you anywhere, as people have no obligations whatsoever over you just because you exist. In that case you end up creating your own problems out of a sheer refusal to adapt even partially to how society operates.

I am against throwing "-ists" and "-isms" around because it does nothing to help the conversation move along, the same way I am against using characteristics/intrinsic characteristics like for instance Autism in this case to be used as a crutch to avoid everything from criticism to self-reflection and taking control over the circumstances of one's own existence.
 
Top