• Fur Affinity Forums are governed by Fur Affinity's Rules and Policies. Links and additional information can be accessed in the Site Information Forum.

Best book series that you have read that is not very well known

SashaBengal

Well-Known Tigress
Obviously you weren't that interested in the film coming out if you didn't seek out news articles or reports related to it. Personally I was, since I'm into film in a big way and sci-fi is a genre I particularly enjoy. So I was disappointed when I discovered Scott Card's funding of anti-gay lobbying groups as a result.

I was super excited about the movie when it was about to be in theaters and I still didn't seek out news articles or reports about it. Not trying to argue, just saying that just because a person doesn't see every little thing about an upcoming movie it doesn't mean they're not a huge fan.

And that's the last I'm saying on the matter. As commented a few times, to each their own.
 

Ashke

Friendly jaguar writer dude
George RR Martin, Neil Gaiman, Ursula Le Guin and Kim Stanley Robinson list it as one of their favourite novels, but its woefully obscure and underrated more broadly.

This fact alone has my interest piqued. I definitely want to check it out now.
 

CarolynNyx

New Member
This fact alone has my interest piqued. I definitely want to check it out now.
Awesome :) (forgive me if the following post is too obsessive)

Well if you do end up getting into it, feel free to flick me a PM if you have any questions/if you want to. It can be a bit difficult/confusing to first get into, mainly because its in the style of a memoir from an unreliable narrator and it uses lots of archaic words, and he often describes technology where he doesn't understand what it is, but once you adjust its a wild ride.

Theres a whole fan community that does podcasts/blogs/etc about it (really love the podcast Alzabo Soup), lots of theories about various aspects of the characters/story/world and theres even been published encyclopedias (most well-known being Lexicon Urthus but that stuff is pretty spoilery). I've found its a really fun sci-fi/fantasy/science fantasy (its even debated which genre it best falls into) book to obsess over. Its probably my favourite book.

I read it twice and probably will again - right now my goal is to get further in the sequels though (the Urth of the New Sun, Book of the Long Sun, Book of the Short Sun). His novel/3 novellas/novella Fifth Head of Cerberus is really great too.
 
O

Okami_No_Heishi

Guest
Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child put out some good stories. So does James Rollins. Lots of action and suspense. And great writing. Their books tend to be page turners.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Varg Stigandr

New Member
It's not published through any publishing house, but the Life of Riley series by Greg Howell is very good.
 

Rant

Haters Gonna Hate

The Wings of Fire series is amazing. They deal with war, loss, acceptance, views of others, disabilities in a positive light, etc. I'm amazed this isn't more popular, it has a fantastic world, magic system and all the different dragon races have different cultures and interests.

Basic plot of the first 5 books is: A war for the throne rages on as the 7 tribes split and take sides with one of the 3 Sandwing princesses a Prophecy is told that 5 eggs hatched on the Brightest night will choose the next queen. But the dragonets of destiny have other plans...
 

Fitch_Tiger

The one and only.
Chronicles of Ancient Darkness by Michelle Paver. Loved the series especially because it was about a boy and a wolf.
 

Llamapie

New Member
Its's not a series, but "I, Ripper" is a fantastic read if you're into horror at all. It's sort of historical fiction told partially from the perspective of Jack the Ripper which is fascinating psychologically, but it also gets pretty gorey and adult at times, so be warned.
 

Rif_Foxworthy

New Member
"K-9 Corps" by Kenneth Von Gunden. A group of genetically altered dogs who can speak follow their friend and handler Ray Larkin through the depths of outer space
 

The Cospunk Prince

The Artist Currently Known as Prince
These are from the YA/Childrens' sections but don't let that fool you, they're amazingly written- The Missing series by Margaret Peterson Haddix(Sci-fi, time travel, seven book series) and The School for Good and Evil by Soman Chainani(4 book series, fantasy). The latter is getting attention and has been on the best seller's list, but Haddix is such an underrated author and all of their series(and even the one-shot novels like Uprising) are amazing.

I'm still in the midst of reading both of these but these are the only two non-manga series that kept my interest as the books go on(There's been so many series that by the middle of the 2nd or 3rd book I just lose interest)

I'm currently reading The Program series by Suzanne Young (Impulse bought The Remedy at a bargain book store not realizing it was the third book of the series =w=''' And just continued from there, gonna read the final book before I go read the first two) but it's not for the week of heart as it deals with suicide. It has 6 books, but every 2 books the lead main characters change and it goes into a different timeline in the same universe. It's really really neat and I didn't even need to read the first two books to understand the third and fourth(Though the fifth and sixth start to tie everything together and mention names from the previous books).
 

alphienya

Perpetually sleepy cat
Skulduggery Pleasant. I't amazing!

Oh my god I love that book so much. Such a shame it isn't more popular. More

I come to bring the Leviathan Trilogy by Scott Westerfeld. It's a mix of steampunk, biopunk, and alternate history since it takes place during the events of WWI. The series follows its two main characters Aleksandar, an illegitimate Austro-Hungarian prince on the run, and Deryn, a girl that disguises herself as a boy named Dylan to get into the British Air Service. Some of the conflicts in the book have to do with biopunk nations (Darwinists) and steampunk nations (Clankers) fighting about which one is right or something. I dunno. It's been a while since I've read these books. But they're great!

Apparently the books got good reviews and even an award or two, but I've only heard of one other person I've talked to reading them. So I guess they could count for a topic such as this.
 

Miles Marsalis

The Last DJ.
Oh my god I love that book so much. Such a shame it isn't more popular. More

I come to bring the Leviathan Trilogy by Scott Westerfeld. It's a mix of steampunk, biopunk, and alternate history since it takes place during the events of WWI. The series follows its two main characters Aleksandar, an illegitimate Austro-Hungarian prince on the run, and Deryn, a girl that disguises herself as a boy named Dylan to get into the British Air Service. Some of the conflicts in the book have to do with biopunk nations (Darwinists) and steampunk nations (Clankers) fighting about which one is right or something. I dunno. It's been a while since I've read these books. But they're great!

Apparently the books got good reviews and even an award or two, but I've only heard of one other person I've talked to reading them. So I guess they could count for a topic such as this.
Have you read his Succession and Uglies series?
 

KyroWolf11

New Member
They probably aren't as good as I'd like them to be. But I love the Darren Shan series and Larten Crepsley series. I also really like the Cherub series.
 

riddles

Active Member
how popular is emily rodda's "deltora quest" outside of australia? reading those books was like a right of passage when i was a kid, but at the time few foreign mates knew what it was.

not a series, but "lives of the monster dogs" by kirsten bakis is fantastic but somewhat obscure.
 

Liseran Thistle

They/Them
The Mysterious Benedict Society By Trenton Lee Stewart is a series of childrens books I read when I was a kid, and still own all the books today, that I feel are way too underappreaciated an would make for a kickass Netflix show. It's got that Lemony Snicket vibe going on, but I feel the two books are so different they could actually work. I've never met anyone else whose ever heard of these books before, and I haven't even seen anyone mention it as a great book for kids, or even list it in a top 10 list which is sad because this book has it all. These are the books that essentially made me want to become a writer, and to work harder on making even more enjoyable stories for people to read, and it saddens me that not a lot of people have heard of the series.

The Secret Series by Pseudonymous Bosch is another great series that I've never heard anyone mention before, but by god are these books fun to read. They have so much charm and personality, that I was surprised as a kid to find I was the only person in my school who had ever heard of such a series. The author himself likes to break the fourth wall using small annotations at the bottom of the page, often times giving the reader information on the characters that wouldn't otherwise be exclusive. There's also the fact that the characters in the book can basically look however the reader wants them to look, and the same goes for the setting as well. The author really wants to push the readers imagination which I enjoyed as a kid, and i still do now. I wish people paid more attention to this series because its honestly one of my favorite books ever from my childhood, and each book was just a mysterious and educational joyride till the very end.

(Also it was the first time I ever read a book where the main character had two dads, and yet the book never makes a thing out of it or even draws attention to it, or even tries to explain how two men could possibly live together like a married couple. It was surprisingly a very open minded book that teaches kids to accept people who are different than them, and to be not just tolerant but accepting of other people's differences.)
 

AppleButt

Well-Known Member
How well known is Hank the Cowdog?

I mean it's a kids book, but I always loved it, and probably still would if I read it. LOL.
 

RossTheRottie

Movie Buff, Aquascapist, Hack Writer
The one that immediately comes to mind is the Foundation series by Isaac Asimov. Its really quite excellent if you like expansive sci-fi that travels to the far reaches of a galaxy and to my mind it isn't a particularly well-known series. I'd imagine the dedicated sci-fi fans out there are at least aware of it though.
I have read through the original trilogy and a couple of others, but I haven't been to a used book store in quite some time to pick up the rest of them.
 

BossRabbit

Patron Lapin
When I was a teenager I remember reading all of those trashy Piers Anthony "Xanth" novels I still remember to this day, they almost felt like western-made animes because it was this bizarre mix of fantasy and reality kind of like One Piece (sorry that's the best comparison I could make). I say that because you have knights and castles and magic, but yet people also have telephones, TVs, and I always crack up thinking about some of the books because I SWEAR the author had a panty fetish (not that that's a bad thing, lol) due to how frequently it was mentioned that all of the females wore real-ass panties compared to say, gowns or frocks or whatever else a woman would wear in actual medieval times.

I dipped out when he made a book entirely about panties, ironically named "The Color of Her Panties", where the entire plot of the novel was something like the hero had to go on a quest in order to find out what color panties some goddess wore in order to embarrass her into freeing their friend... That's when I realized I was just reading some deviant's crazy sex fantasies disguised as fantasy novels. I still love a lot of the other books in that series, though. I remember reading one called "Isle of View" that was about a reptile girl or something.
 
Top