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Bodies?

Been a bit confused on the whole about drawing a body (Used to headshots lol)
Would this be the correct process?
9DCA71CA-E46F-4E16-96AB-250C133B3303.jpeg

Any advice, tips, and suggestions are not just appreciated, but encouraged! Teach me your ways! \o/
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
I don't think there is a single correct way to draw.

I draw figures in a very different way (I will put some progress shots in spoilers- they're all Safe For Work)
DvrXVBPWoAAAsBG.jpg
DRN1Cq4XcAAF7DY.jpg:large
DMrj4pFXUAAalG-.jpg:large
I think that, rather than learning arbitrary rules like 'figures must be 8 heads tall', that attending a life-drawing class and building up a mental library of experience is more helpful. I think it's important to stretch yourself to draw on large (A1 or A0) pieces of paper too, because a lot of people draw mostly with their wrist, and using your elbow and shoulder occasionally prompts to you take a new approach to your drawing style. It can help you look at the way you draw slightly differently.
 

Overfix8

Active Member
There's no one correct way. There's many different ways to get the result you want. Even professionals will teach different processes. Some prefer cubes, some prefer ovals, some start at the head and make a line of action from there, some start with the chest, that kind of thing.

This one looks a little similar to what I do if that helps (I use a lot of ovals to plan where parts will go, then reshape). I suggest looking into other processes and experiment to find what works for you. I'd also suggest learning flow before anatomy, as starting at anatomy often leads to a stiff style (and what I think Proko calls mannequin syndrome).
 
There's no one correct way. There's many different ways to get the result you want. Even professionals will teach different processes. Some prefer cubes, some prefer ovals, some start at the head and make a line of action from there, some start with the chest, that kind of thing.

This one looks a little similar to what I do if that helps (I use a lot of ovals to plan where parts will go, then reshape). I suggest looking into other processes and experiment to find what works for you. I'd also suggest learning flow before anatomy, as starting at anatomy often leads to a stiff style (and what I think Proko calls mannequin syndrome).
I don't think there is a single correct way to draw.

I draw figures in a very different way (I will put some progress shots in spoilers- they're all Safe For Work)
DvrXVBPWoAAAsBG.jpg
DRN1Cq4XcAAF7DY.jpg:large
DMrj4pFXUAAalG-.jpg:large
I think that, rather than learning arbitrary rules like 'figures must be 8 heads tall', that attending a life-drawing class and building up a mental library of experience is more helpful. I think it's important to stretch yourself to draw on large (A1 or A0) pieces of paper too, because a lot of people draw mostly with their wrist, and using your elbow and shoulder occasionally prompts to you take a new approach to your drawing style. It can help you look at the way you draw slightly differently.
Mk, thanks guys!
 
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