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British or American English?

Stray Cat Terry

고먐미
First off, a disclaimer:
I'm never trying to fix sides and cause conflicts, hence we need no polls at all. Stay cool and we want no fights, yeah?

Now to the topic:

We all know that the English is a masterkey language of the major cultures of the globe. And I of course was taught English as a second language. Yes, I'm not a native speaker.
What's the issue? I am a South Korean (ROK) who was educated in both the southern region of China and Hong Kong when I was young due to personal reasons. As I have went through half of my education in HK(British) and the other half on ROK(American), my pronunciation is, in a good term, hybrid; in a bad term, abomination. (No offense to anyone else, it's just for myself.)

Of course, it doesn't really matter if all I expect to do is to type and read on the internet, but it just comes to my mind once in a while that my speaking is mixed. I know the differences on my head, but my mouth just goes 'astray' when I just try to speak em out naturally.

I expect I'm not alone in this world, as I know a few real life friends who went through this sorta changes alongsides me on learning English, so why not?
Also, I wanted to hear each English's pros and cons (or else) on certain circumstances from their native speakers and those who are more familiar to English than an Asian like me.

So, anything from anyone is alright, fun stuffs are more than welcomed as well! Anything you wanna share about British and American English? OwO

Edit:
Oh and also! Does it make you feel odd when you see people like me using mixed pronunciations and/or word choices of both?
 
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D

Deleted member 111470

Guest
Anything you feel like sharing about differences of American and British? OwO
Hmm.. apart from some words not having a "u" like favourite vs favorite, I prefer how American English sounds. For example, in some places of the USA, people don't say the "t" when it's after an N. They say "inernet" instead of "internet". They might also say "aluminum" instead of "aluminium".

For the front cover of the car, people in the usa say "hood" while in the uk it's "bonnet".
 

Stray Cat Terry

고먐미
Hmm.. apart from some words not having a "u" like favourite vs favorite, I prefer how American English sounds. For example, in some places of the USA, people don't say the "t" when it's after an N. They say "inernet" instead of "internet". They might also say "aluminum" instead of "aluminium".

For the front cover of the car, people in the usa say "hood" while in the uk it's "bonnet".

Ooh yeah!

I tend to go like "That aluminum bonnet I saw from the internet is preddy awesome!"

Hybrid pronunciation and word choices XP

I know it's not that hard to grasp the meaning of what I say, but it's no doubt an odd usage of words and pronunciations >p<
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
I'm an English person from the Home-counties, who speaks 'Queen's English'.

There is no single British English though.
Review this Scots English version of the Lord's prayer for example:

Wir Faither in Hivin,
Yir name be keepit in awe,
Yir ring begin,
i the warld as in Hivin.
Gie us ilk day wir breid for the day,
An forgie whit we are awin tae Yirsel,
As we forgie ithers whit is awin tae us.
An dinna trachle us sairly,
but free us frae the Deil;
fur the Croun is yir ain,
An the micht an the glorie,
Warld upo warld.
Sae be it.
 

Firuthi Dragovic

Gamer Dragon, former speedrunner
American English here.

The only one I ever remember that hasn't been covered yet is emphasis on certain letters being silent.

Schedule vs schedule for instance.
 

Telnac

Fundamentalist Heretic
I speak American English but one could argue that there isn't even just one form of American English too. There are a myriad of regional dialects. I'm an ex military brat so how I pronounce certain works is determined by where I lived at the time they entered my vocabulary. For example, I pronounce the "o" in "over" with a short "u" like when pronouncing "oven" rather than the long "o" like when pronouncing "Odin." Apparently that's a pronunciation specific to parts of Virginia where I lived briefly as a child. And yet I pronounce the first "o" in "overlord" with the long "o" because I lived in California by the time I learned that word. That fact has seriously confused people I've run across who are good at picking up where you're from my which dialect you speak, because I speak with multiple dialects simultaneously.
 

Punji

Vaskebjørn
A professor of mine once told me a story about a time when he looked for the oldest American dictionary he could find. He said the one he found was suggested to be one of the first, and in it the author stated he had intentionally misspelled some words so they would be easier for the average person, on the belief that most Americans were stupid and would struggle with proper English spelling.

Personally I use a mix of British and American English. I add my Us where they belong but for some words I spell them however I feel like spelling them. Usually this is British but sometimes it's not.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
Fanny has a pretty different meaning in British English btw. :}

A professor of mine once told me a story about a time when he looked for the oldest American dictionary he could find. He said the one he found was suggested to be one of the first, and in it the author stated he had intentionally misspelled some words so they would be easier for the average person, on the belief that most Americans were stupid and would struggle with proper English spelling.

Personally I use a mix of British and American English. I add my Us where they belong but for some words I spell them however I feel like spelling them. Usually this is British but sometimes it's not.

This sounds a bit like British propaganda. ;D
 
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Stray Cat Terry

고먐미
I speak American English but one could argue that there isn't even just one form of American English too. There are a myriad of regional dialects. I'm an ex military brat so how I pronounce certain works is determined by where I lived at the time they entered my vocabulary. For example, I pronounce the "o" in "over" with a short "u" like when pronouncing "oven" rather than the long "o" like when pronouncing "Odin." Apparently that's a pronunciation specific to parts of Virginia where I lived briefly as a child. And yet I pronounce the first "o" in "overlord" with the long "o" because I lived in California by the time I learned that word. That fact has seriously confused people I've run across who are good at picking up where you're from my which dialect you speak, because I speak with multiple dialects simultaneously.
A professor of mine once told me a story about a time when he looked for the oldest American dictionary he could find. He said the one he found was suggested to be one of the first, and in it the author stated he had intentionally misspelled some words so they would be easier for the average person, on the belief that most Americans were stupid and would struggle with proper English spelling.

Personally I use a mix of British and American English. I add my Us where they belong but for some words I spell them however I feel like spelling them. Usually this is British but sometimes it's not.

Ooh! Both your informations help a lot!
Now I guess it's not really that weird to have diverse pronunciations and accents?

Thankies! It kinda relieved me UwU
 

TemetNosce88

Technology won't save you
American English speaker. I can see mixing British and American slang or words being a possible issue. If someone is using British spelling and words, I know enough to be able to 'translate' what they mean, so it's not much of an issue. Mixing the two together might be tricky, though. Though overall, I think I have more trouble understanding Southern American English more than I do British English. Could be that I watch a lot of UK television, though.
 

Yakamaru

Darn tootin'
THE BRI'ISH ARE COMING!

I use a mixture of both.
 

Nexus Cabler

Abstract Concepts Coordinator
I use American English, mostly
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
a man with an English accent could probably talk me into many things
 

TyraWadman

The Silent Observer
I had a very British English teacher in grade 2. Rolled her R's too. That's when I started spelling Colour instead of Color, because if I didn't, it was considered wrong. Then when I started doing Colour instead of Color with other teachers, it was marked wrong. I thought I was crazy until I eventually learned they were both technically correct.

I was raised english, but my mother kept her accent so while I was never taught Korean, I guess I emulated her accent too much and it just comes out sometimes.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
I had a very British English teacher in grade 2. Rolled her R's too. That's when I started spelling Colour instead of Color, because if I didn't, it was considered wrong. Then when I started doing Colour instead of Color with other teachers, it was marked wrong. I thought I was crazy until I eventually learned they were both technically correct.

I was raised english, but my mother kept her accent so while I was never taught Korean, I guess I emulated her accent too much and it just comes out sometimes.
This is pretty rare in British people.
 

Jackpot Raccuki

Aka the hot single in your area. (Not Single)
I am Brit boi.
I love spelling colour and armour.
I say Chips over “Fries” and Crisps over Chips.

I tease my American BF a lot as he does with me and my accent.
Apparently it’s strong when I’m angery which isn’t surprising from where I’m from.

A professor of mine once told me a story about a time when he looked for the oldest American dictionary he could find. He said the one he found was suggested to be one of the first, and in it the author stated he had intentionally misspelled some words so they would be easier for the average person, on the belief that most Americans were stupid and would struggle with proper English spelling.
Somehow I instinctively knew that’d be true.
At least he was right about one thing.
 
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