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British or American English?

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
Yes, it's a Scots affectation.

Something else I notice is that a lot of people think British people don't pronounce the 't' in words.

'wa-er', 'bri-ish',

But this is only done in some distinctive regional accents...and there are other regional accents where hard 't' sounds are introduced where the rest of us *don't* say them, such as Yorkshire accents where 'th' becomes a hard t.
 

Faustus

Well-Known Member
Something else I notice is that a lot of people think British people don't pronounce the 't' in words.
Yes, in some accents it's replaced with a glottal stop, but in others (such as the so-called 'BBC accent') it is very noticeable. Conversely, in many forms of the American accent, the hard T is almost absent except when making an emphatic, and commonly sounds more like a soft 'd'.

You can really hear the difference in a lot of movies where Brits and Americans share a scene.
 

ben909

vaporeon
So

is it

meth-ane

or

me-thane
 

Faustus

Well-Known Member
So is it meth-ane or me-thane
Either is correct because language is a science of consensus. If enough people pronounce and understand a word in a particular way, it's correct. I believe the original pronunciation would have been meth-ayn, as it's descended from methyl, but pronunciations change over time. If they didn't, the word 'Knight' would be pronounced more like 'k-nicht' (that is, the German word 'nicht' with a strong K sound at the beginning.)
 

Pomorek

Antelope-Addicted Hyena
I've been told that I can pull off rather convincing American accent, so this has to be it.

I keep having trouble with "gray" vs. "grey" though.
 

Punji

Vaskebjørn
I've been told that I can pull off rather convincing American accent, so this has to be it.

I keep having trouble with "gray" vs. "grey" though.
A for American, E for English. :D
 

Kumali

Lupine-American
language is a science of consensus. If enough people pronounce and understand a word in a particular way, it's correct.

This is really the important thing. I'm sure that if OP and I were speaking in person, I'd have no problem understanding regardless of accent or vocabulary differences. Your written English is excellent, and I would imagine that most people speaking their native language with a non-native speaker who's that accomplished would overlook slight differences. (At least I'd hope so.)

There are quite a few vocabulary differences between British and American English when you really dig deep into it. There are words that are spelled differently (though of course that doesn't matter in speech): besides the plethora of words ending in -or in America or -our in Britain (color, flavor, harbor, favor, rumor, humor, honor, the list goes on and on), there's curb/kerb, check/cheque, jail/gaol, and others I'll probably think of as soon as I finish writing this. :) Then there are words that are pronounced differently in the two countries, like "garage" (ga-RAZH in America, GAIR-aj in Britain). Then there are the words that mean different things in the two countries, like "chips," and then there are the things for which there are different words (the "trunk" or "boot" of a car, "highway' or "motorway," "truck" or "lorry").

All of that said, though, if we were chatting here in America and you dropped a British-ism into your speech, either in word choice or pronunciation, well, who cares? I lived in Europe for a few years and hung out with English, Scottish and Irish people all the time as well as many non-native English speakers, with all the differences in our various versions of English, and we never had any problem understanding each other. So really, I wouldn't worry about it. Just keep reminding yourself of Faustus's words of wisdom up there.
 

Jaredthefox92

Banned
Banned
I believe in terms of characterization, it depends. Some characters of mine are delightfully British, others like Grief are intentionally "American". In real life, I can suppress my southern twang and actually speak to a lot of Europeans on a daily basis, but I don't mind British accents (heck that is one thing that makes Warhammer fun.) So long as I can understand you.
 

Jaredthefox92

Banned
Banned
I'm told by my British friends in my Discord that they dig my southern twang accent. So I would say American, not that I hate British accents. In fact one reason I like Warhammer.
 

Nexus Cabler

Conduit of Synergy
I enjoy both at this point

Not in terms of accent, but rather vocabulary and synonyms, such as calling an elevator a lift, or calling Fall Autumn
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
I enjoy both at this point

Not in terms of accent, but rather vocabulary and synonyms, such as calling an elevator a lift, or calling Fall Autumn

If things go really badly we can an elevator a fall.
 

PhoxSpark

just vibing
I like more British english but probably because I'm European. In reality I barely can differentiate them, for me english is what it is and everyone has its way to talk it.

I don't know if I use the british or american vocabulary or a mix of both...
 

Mayfurr

Mostly Harmless
British English here, after all I'm in one of their former colonial possessions. (Well technically, it's "New Zealand English".)

In other words, I go on holidays, not vacation, the season before winter is autumn, not fall, and I don't pronounce "herbs" as "erbs", because as Eddie Izzard points out "... it's got a fucking 'H' in it!" :D
 

Koriekraiz13

kleptomaniac for knowledge
I prefer British english, much more understandable. Plus since i'm british, the American pronunciation is weird.
 

Jaredthefox92

Banned
Banned
I prefer American, what the utter fuck is "potato crisps?" What is "fish and chips." They're chips and fries. Autumn is boring, Fall because things fall to the ground. (quite often here where I live).

As cool as it sounds in Warhammer, American English just sounds funnier with profanity. FOOKING doesn't sound nearly as funny as "fuhking".
 

Frank Gulotta

Send us your floppy
The balance of which one you hear and interact with more may have an influence. But all in all I just pick and choose what I prefer

Depends also on who I'm talking to, sometimes it can lead to needless confusion
 

Xitheon

The cat's mother.
My American boyfriend doesn't understand why us Brits say herb (with a "huh" sound and not with a silent h.) I told him that we say herb instead of 'erb and he said "that's WEIRD, wtf."

Bloody Americans, butchering our language and stealing all our women. *shakes fist*
 
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