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Can any of these desktop PCs run and stream VRChat?

Palybuddi

Member
I'm looking into upgrading from my Mac Mini to a desktop PC, and I found these two budget-friendly ones online (one is on Best Buy, and the other is on Amazon).

  1. HP M01-F1124
  2. Lenovo Thinkcentre

I'm getting a PC so that I can play and live-stream VRChat and Minecraft. I'm not planning on getting a VR headset with the PC, but I will get one eventually.

Will any of these PCs run and stream VRChat? If they can't, what are some other PC options under $800?
 

GroovySpaceFox

Well-Known Member
Based on a quick search, it looks like the HP system will be your best option. Both systems should run Minecraft fine but the 2 extra cores in the HP system will defiantly help with streaming. As for VR chat, according to the system requirements, it will run best with a discrete GPU with at least 4 GB of VRAM (this probably assumes that a headset is being used). Since both systems have integrated graphics, performance might be reduced but it may still run. Unfortunately, wit will be very difficult to find a system for less than $800 with a decent discrete GPU. I would ultimately recommend doing some more research but the HP system will provide significantly more processing performance (which will help a lot with streaming) as well as more space to upgrade to a discrete GPU when prices come down.

Basically, the Lenovo system should work well enough for just playing and streaming Minecraft. The processor in the Lenovo system should still be good for VRChat but the graphics might not be capable. The HP system will provide better performance for streaming and VRChat as well as more space for upgrading in the future.
 
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Palybuddi

Member
Based on a quick search, it looks like the HP system will be your best option. Both systems should run Minecraft fine but the 2 extra cores in the HP system will defiantly help with streaming. As for VR chat, according to the system requirements, it will run best with a discrete GPU with at least 4 GB of VRAM (this probably assumes that a headset is being used). Since both systems have integrated graphics, performance might be reduced but it may still run. Unfortunately, wit will be very difficult to find a system for less than $800 with a decent discrete GPU. I would ultimately recommend doing some more research but the HP system will provide significantly more processing performance (which will help a lot with streaming) as well as more space to upgrade to a discrete GPU when prices come down.

Basically, the Lenovo system should work well enough for just playing and streaming Minecraft. The processor in the Lenovo system should still be good for VRChat but the graphics might not be capable. The HP system will provide better performance for streaming and VRChat as well as more space for upgrading in the future.
Ok, thanks!
 
I'd really avoid the 2nd option if I were you, even if the price is tempting compared to the first it's cheaper for a reason really, and the integrated graphics on the first one will run circles around the Lenovo one. It may very well be the difference between having a lot of games "playable" and a stuttery mess. Though I cannot comfortably recommend the first system either if you intend to play VR chat and stream it at the same time.

What would be a viable option however would be if you got the first system and added an entry level dedicated graphics card down the line to boost performance and handle stream encoding. The Lenovo however is on a socket/platform from mid 2013, 8 year old computer hardware is bad enough today for a supposedly new system. It is not worth the asking price for what you get for many reasons.

I had a quick browse on bestbuy, but every system I'd consider recommending was out of stock, every single system with an entry level graphics card worth putting money on sold out as to be expected in the today and now.

In all fairness a lot of systems will be able to run minecraft and even VR chat and you don't need a lot, but it's bad to spend money that you get absolutely no value from.
 

Attaman

"I say we forget this business and run."
What would be a good graphics card for the HP Desktop?
While I cannot specify on specific graphics cards, I will note that if this is one of your first times building a PC yourself you may (see: really) want to talk with a more informed friend whom you trust on the matter in regards to suppliers. I say this as there's currently a huge quality and cost crunch on graphics cards due to their extensive use, and so you'll need to look out for:
1) A decent deal
2) Not buying something that will die on you in about two weeks of mild use

The best tip I can give in regards to that if you don't have somebody you trust to ask re: suppliers is to make absolutely sure they have a refund policy and that reviews support that making use of it isn't like pulling teeth from a rabid chihuahua.
 
What would be a good graphics card for the HP Desktop?
I dug into the details of the specific system you linked and I have my concerns.

Checking here:

It says that it has only a 180W power supply, I wouldn't be fully comfortably be able to recommend putting in a dedicated graphics card that only run on the power provided by the motherboard(Which top out around 75W via the PCIE slot). Though I believe it would be fully capable of running it, I am not the person who'd recommend someone that in your shoes. I will say though looking on the user manual that putting in a dedicated graphics card shouldn't be too much a problem, if it weren't for that sub par power supply. Essentially you are left with 105W for the rest of the system which isn't a whole lot, hopefully you'll see where I am coming at here with those numbers.

They even have this nice little PDF

But if I'd have to say I wouldn't really be comfortable recommending anything, but if I tried to throw in a graphics card in that system I'd give a whirl with something like a 1650 from nvidia, but a card like that they recommend 300W(Though this you shouldn't follow blindly either). As said, I'm not really comfortable recommending anything even though it could work.

If I'm not mistaken too, HP will be using proprietary power supply too in a system like this one. But this is on assumptions.

TL : DR, I'd try to find another pre built system if I were you. Do you have any other computers you've been looking at fren?
 

Palybuddi

Member
Do you have any other computers you've been looking at fren?
I found this one, but the seller cannot deliver to my location :p

Is there any PCs you can recommend?

I'm looking for something that
  • can run and stream VRChat & Minecraft
  • can connect to ethernet
  • is VR compatible (for the near future)
  • is pre-built
  • has over 500 gb of disk space
  • is under $800
    (if there's nothing like this under $800, you can recommend me the cheapest desktop you can find.)
 
I'm sure I and people on the forum would try to help you.

  • can run and stream VRChat & Minecraft
Most computers will be able to to run these titles today as they are not very demanding, though you probably want an entry level dedicated graphics card for the latter.

  • can connect to ethernet
All new computers today can today pretty much.

  • is VR compatible (for the near future)
The moment you want to get into VR, you put most of the heavy lifting on the graphics card, a VR experience under 800 today could be a bit tricky due to bad stock and rising prices with graphics cards. There are lots of used cards you can get out there that are good enough to run VR, but then you wouldn't really have any warranty and you'd need to install it yourself into your system and what not.
  • is pre-built
I believe you are from the states? There are quite a few larger system builders out there that arguably use better quality hardware from known brands. Now I don't have any experience with any of these businesses, but you have things like originPC, ibuypower, NZXT BLD, Digitalstorm, CyberpowerPC, etc. But there are more gaming oriented lines inside of HP for example like their Omen lineup.
  • has over 500 gb of disk space
Most PC's new nowadays pass this easily, the difference tend to be what kind of storage it is and how fast it is.

With that said, you easily pass the 1000 bucks if you want a respectable new pre built today, and it's hard to find a good deal sometimes, the same system from over a year ago probably just have a 150-200 markup on it today due to the bad market. And when you go for pre-builts you also very often get a small charge for assembly. So in that sense I kinda want to guide you towards something like HP omen brand as they have a big name behind them, probably get more supply of graphics card than any of the small guys, and you will get the customer support and help if needed down the line. But you always get what you pay for when we talk about new computers from bigger brands.

It's almost hard to give people really good advice about buying new things today since the prices are the way they are, but I just want to sway you from making a terrible one.

Counting away it only has 1 drive with 512 GB of storage, it has both a processor and a graphics card that would manage to do what you want it to, and you could also easily set up so the graphics card encodes your streams with minimum performance hit. It isn't part of their omen line, but pre built you don't seem to get away cheaper than that. I am also not sure where from you'd buy the system if you used the link provided so I'd advise checking where you buy it from via that Amazon link, but if you look on the hardware you probably want to aim for something similar or better.
 

Palybuddi

Member
https://www.amazon.com/HP-Pavilion-Computer-Processor-TG01-0030/dp/B07XV7YRSL/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=hp+omen+desktop&qid=1622551639&refinements=p_36%3A2421883011&rnid=2421879011&s=pc&sr=1-2
Counting away it only has 1 drive with 512 GB of storage, it has both a processor and a graphics card that would manage to do what you want it to, and you could also easily set up so the graphics card encodes your streams with minimum performance hit. It isn't part of their omen line, but pre built you don't seem to get away cheaper than that. I am also not sure where from you'd buy the system if you used the link provided so I'd advise checking where you buy it from via that Amazon link, but if you look on the hardware you probably want to aim for something similar or better.
That HP Pavilion is looking good, although I'm wondering if 8GB RAM will be able to handle VR streaming.

What is the best computer you could find that matches all of my specifications, but doesn't fit within my $800 budget?
 
It will be on the lower side, and doing light streaming on my system I get very close to using 8GB of system memory with some background processes running. Though chucking in some more ram would probably be easier and cheaper than finding what we're looking for at around the same price.

I wish to say I have no personal experience with NZXT BLD, but from what I've seen they don't seem to be bad at least, and offer pretty much what you'd need and of course you get proper warranty on parts and labour: 999 $ https://nzxt.com/product/the-starter

There is a small markup on getting a pre built from guys like these though, so if you dug around more on the internet you might be able to find something at least 50 off but in your case. However, the processor that comes with that system Core i5-9400F, it's a 6 core non hyper threaded processor, so with that said, this is if we think about using the GPU for encoding the stream, some games might get a bit stuttery when trying to encode a stream on a 6 core non hyper threaded CPU. There's also another slight bummer and that is that the 1650 does not use the newest version of NVENC encoder, while I believe the 1650 super and above does.

So value could arguably be better for a grand, but yeah, simplicity and availability and hopefully no headaches. I'm positive however that someone who digs around a bit more at pre builts or know your market a bit better would be able to find you a better deal than I can.
 

quoting_mungo

Well-Known Member
I'd be happy to toss a link to the thread to much more hardware-literate boyfriend to get his input, but one important question I don't offhand see an answer to in the thread, that will seriously impact what you'll want in a system: When you say you want to stream Minecraft, are you talking about vanilla or just about vanilla (maybe JEI and some other UI mods), or do you want to use heavily modded Minecraft for your streams?

I know my system, prior to a recent upgrade (not really gotten around to trying since), was struggling and sometimes hitching with running large modpacks, but was absolutely fine with lighter ones (I don't really play unmodded Minecraft at all).
 

Lyrule

Warrior of the Sun
Currently, my computer is a pre-built Dell Inspiron 5680. It's decent for what it is, but it was paid more than what it's actually worth. That's often the problem with pre-built PC's. You end up paying more than what it's actually worth. If I had the option I would've much preferred building my own PC.

I understand building a PC isn't optimal at times, especially with the influx of GPU prices. Personally, I don't recommend either of the options you linked. Mostly if the computer isn't aimed at gaming, chances are it's not gonna have the specs to handle VR Chat and streaming at the same time. Watching a friend stream VR Chat (who's got a decent gaming computer) he sometimes even majorly lags out, or his stream freezes upon loading into worlds.

It may not be the option you want to hear, but I recommend saving a little bit more and checking out ibuypower. I heard they make decent gaming computers at decent prices, slightly higher than the 800 mark you're going for.

Even still, I believe you can build a decently made budget PC for 800-900 USD. Check out pcpartpicker.com and do plenty of research into the parts. It can look intimidating and you might be overwhelmed, but once you start learning and reading about these parts you begin to understand how important it is to not cheap out on quality.

You can also try a gaming laptop. I'm not sure much about those since I don't have a laptop, but they could be a cheaper option over PC.
 
Currently, my computer is a pre-built Dell Inspiron 5680. It's decent for what it is, but it was paid more than what it's actually worth. That's often the problem with pre-built PC's. You end up paying more than what it's actually worth. If I had the option I would've much preferred building my own PC.

I understand building a PC isn't optimal at times, especially with the influx of GPU prices. Personally, I don't recommend either of the options you linked. Mostly if the computer isn't aimed at gaming, chances are it's not gonna have the specs to handle VR Chat and streaming at the same time. Watching a friend stream VR Chat (who's got a decent gaming computer) he sometimes even majorly lags out, or his stream freezes upon loading into worlds.

It may not be the option you want to hear, but I recommend saving a little bit more and checking out ibuypower. I heard they make decent gaming computers at decent prices, slightly higher than the 800 mark you're going for.

Even still, I believe you can build a decently made budget PC for 800-900 USD. Check out pcpartpicker.com and do plenty of research into the parts. It can look intimidating and you might be overwhelmed, but once you start learning and reading about these parts you begin to understand how important it is to not cheap out on quality.

You can also try a gaming laptop. I'm not sure much about those since I don't have a laptop, but they could be a cheaper option over PC.
To add on of the suggestion of Ibuypower

Saw this video GN posted not long ago about a system they bought from iBuypower

Personally I'd stay away from ordering from there until they learn how to pack and ship their computers properly, set bios settings and potentially have staff assemble them a bit better. Though this is one sample out of many systems they probably ship, getting something in the state they did is quite concerning however. Otherwise the whole idea of saving up a bit more for a desktop or just kicking out a bit more money in general to be safe is a good idea.
 

Lyrule

Warrior of the Sun
To add on of the suggestion of Ibuypower

Saw this video GN posted not long ago about a system they bought from iBuypower

Personally I'd stay away from ordering from there until they learn how to pack and ship their computers properly, set bios settings and potentially have staff assemble them a bit better. Though this is one sample out of many systems they probably ship, getting something in the state they did is quite concerning however. Otherwise the whole idea of saving up a bit more for a desktop or just kicking out a bit more money in general to be safe is a good idea.
Ooooooo, I didn't know this. I've only heard from friends who have an ibuypower PC, they've said it runs okay. I guess they got lucky?
 
Ooooooo, I didn't know this. I've only heard from friends who have an ibuypower PC, they've said it runs okay. I guess they got lucky?
Me neither until I saw the video, but any system builder shipping computers without proper packaging should have a big caution sign. But even if it's a one time off sort of thing, there's some questionable stuff there to me. Thought I'd chuck the video in here, but I am glad your friends got systems that weren't in complete shambles. In all fairness if that was the only thing they did, they wouldn't be in business, but some kind of quality control should be expected really.
 

Lyrule

Warrior of the Sun
Me neither until I saw the video, but any system builder shipping computers without proper packaging should have a big caution sign. But even if it's a one time off sort of thing, there's some questionable stuff there to me. Thought I'd chuck the video in here, but I am glad your friends got systems that weren't in complete shambles. In all fairness if that was the only thing they did, they wouldn't be in business, but some kind of quality control should be expected really.
Oh, for sure. It's good to keep things like this in mind and checking how frequent it happens before making a purchase with them.
 

quoting_mungo

Well-Known Member
Vanilla Minecraft, maybe multiplayer vanilla sometimes.
Cheers! I imagine Minecraft shouldn’t be your limiting factor then, unless you leave it on for ludicrous amounts of time (ugh Java memory leaks). I’ll see if boyfriend has any input!

EDIT: Boyfriend says the first system you linked should work with the addition of a mid- to high-range graphics card. I know the GPU market isn’t exactly consumer friendly right now, but it’s if nothing else a reference point for what makes a passable system.
 
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Attaman

"I say we forget this business and run."
With vanilla Minecraft the main things that might suffer are ability to use Amplified terrain generation and overall render distance. Minecraft isn't exactly optimized, but it's better than it was years ago and I would not be surprised if streaming was a bigger bottleneck in casual play / settings than the game itself.
 

Palybuddi

Member
I'm also using 2 monitors (a S22F350 Display and a E320VP Display) with my current mac. Will I be able to use these with any of the 3 PCs above with these 2 monitors? Also, do monitors hinder the performance of a PC?
 
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