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Confessions thread

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Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
Doesn't the diminished time and greater responsibilities that we come to possess when we grow older factor in most people's capability of working on their potential talents? Provided such talent is not intertwined with one's career, or such.

I had a remarkably easy time learning foreign languages when I was a kid, but now I do find that it has become increasingly difficult to really learn new things as I did back then.

I don't feel brain "plasticity" plays as much of a big role in limiting potential as one's circumstances do. If only everyone had the resources to completely dedicate themselves to working on what they have an affinity for...

Studies have isolated brain plasticity as the leading variable. It is still possible to learn foreign languages, and become fluent, as an adult. Children, however, uniformly outperform adults, intuitively picking up subtle pronunciations and intonations that their elders struggle to imitate.
 
Over the course of several years I've had urges to be a girl instead of a boy, although I feel like I cannot tell whether it's what I wish for a fantasy or a reality.
 

SkyboundTerror

Thrashing About
The drought we were having here in CA made the surrounding hills, mountains, and fields look like crap brown for years; depressing stuff to see, at any rate. But with the rain we got this past month, everything is much, much greener, and as tree-hugging hippie sappy as it sounds, seeing all this green makes me glad I'm alive.

Just a glance at the lush green and I feel euphoric. It's gorgeous.
 

Luki

Member
I've been almost severely underweight according to those BMI calculations for some years now.

I confess that...I actually like it this way.
 

Mikazuki Marazhu

I hate you all
I've been almost slightly overweight according to those BMI calculations for years now.

And...I actually like it this way.
 

Luki

Member
As long as we're comfortable with ourselves, right? ~

People certainly have encouraged me to put on some weight but...I really don't wanna.
 

Feste

I haven't found an answer yet
I have a thing for chubs

Fat or half-hard?

I am not a big fan of AC/DC. All the songs kinda sound the same, and the beat's usually too slow for the mood I want when I listen to that kind of music. Back in Black is ok, but I don't see why it's still one of the biggest albums ever.
 

Evan of Phrygia

WwwHhAaaAaTtTttTttTtT
Fat or half-hard?

I am not a big fan of AC/DC. All the songs kinda sound the same, and the beat's usually too slow for the mood I want when I listen to that kind of music. Back in Black is ok, but I don't see why it's still one of the biggest albums ever.
See, I am a firm believer in the idea that the judgment of music is subjective at its' core, but at the same time I cannot stand the fact that they are so popular. I have such a damn low opinion of AC/DC from what I've heard and especially as a drummer I fucking hate the borderline non-existent literature that the drumset parts comprise of.

So I hate how popular they are because i just don't understand it and think it's stupid, yet at the same time I would be a huge hypocrite for enforcing that so much.
 

Schwimmwagen

Well-Known Member
I couldn't care less about people's subjective tastes, but it kinda annoys me when people state their opinion as a comment on the objective aspects of a music genre. "Metal is just yelling" for a starter.

Totes okay if you find it unbearable, but if you think it's just mindless yelling, you're clearly not listening.
 

Ariosto

New Member
I couldn't care less about people's subjective tastes, but it kinda annoys me when people state their opinion as a comment on the objective aspects of a music genre. "Metal is just yelling" for a starter.

Totes okay if you find it unbearable, but if you think it's just mindless yelling, you're clearly not listening.
To quote Anton Ego: "the bitter truth we critics must face, is that in the grand scheme of things, the average piece of junk is probably more meaningful than our criticism designating it so", and it applies to that kind of commentary, especially when it becomes argumentless bashing.

On that note, I think I stand the opposite even less, for some reason: senseless, flowery, commonplace, pseudo-objective adoration. I'm okay with it in chitchat and everyday converations, but the moment I see the word 'powerful' and a cavalcade of good adjectives and nothing else in a book review or cover, I start feeling upset.

As a general rule, subjective as taste is, I enjoy it when people at least can transmit it in effective ways, either through words or gestures; it's fun to see them passionate about something, be it in a possitive or negative sense. They may not be able to give me a precise 'why', but I may feel they have deep reasons for their opinion and that fills me with joy. However, sometimes they express it in a way that feels so meaningless, so clichéd and so in search of imposing itself as the ultimate truth, that I can't help but being appalled.
 
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Art Vulpine

Art Vulpine
Agreed.

Case in point, I listen to power and melodic metal (Nightwish, Lacuna Coil, Blind Guardian, Hammerfall, Iced Earth, Avantasia) and these don't have much yelling or growling involved. I'm not a fan of death/ doom metal but it's ok if others like it. One of my friends is actually in a death metal band and i don't mind his music.
 

Evan of Phrygia

WwwHhAaaAaTtTttTttTtT
I mean all of this essentially boils down to taking sound and assigning some sort of idea to it. What I hate (and what causes misguided judgment) is that it's nobody taking sound as sound. The dislike becomes a preconception and eventually evolves into an inability to hear the music that is actually there. We're smart enough to understand how and why each aspect exists in a sonic palette, to the point where we actively dictate each note under that concept. Screaming is one of the most massively misunderstood instances I could possibly think of, because if you can't dissociate what he's doing from what it sounds like and the effect it has on the music, then you're never gonna be able to appreciate it. It is, at its' core, a vocal effect. From there, how does it exist in the texture? Would it happen to be part of a very loud, dark, distortion-based timbre of sounds?

The way in which we are able to quickly understand exactly what's happening, if anything, forces us into a state where we then understand even less about the music.

To some extent this still relies on opinion for me to say this, but this is far from the extent of how much I am willing to defend the notion.

Am I saying you have to like each sound you come into contact with? Certainly not, but if you can't at the least take it for what it is and understand what qualities are apparent, rather than work off of what your perception may inherently tell you, then you may very well dislike something purely for not actually understanding it.

I am split about the passion argument. It, to one extent, relies again on an immediate perceptive judgment (this this and this are present so it sounds different), and it's worth noting that a Passionate C Major does not have any sonic difference from an "unpassionate" C Major. The judgment of whether or not music is "passionate" based on the structure also has flaws because there are certain easy-to-construct chord progressions that easily deceive the ear, and at times the "passionate" answer can actually be created via noncommittal and passionless methods. Thus, passion within music exists as an emotion not inherent of the designer or the piece, but is simply a fluctuating measurement of that particular emotion. To experience that emotion and appreciate it is all well and good, but to strive for it can lead to misconceptions.
Reasoning that creates passion is equally hard to gauge and is something I would also recommend caution on searching for. You would be surprised at how much can still be heard, even when the music is designed in such shallow reasoning.
It is probably a bit odd for me to argue you on that point because I do have similar feelings, but I do think those feelings have never led me to objectively "better" music. Sometimes due to searching for a purpose I missed a great deal of what I could appreciate.
 
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Ariosto

New Member
I am split about the passion argument.

I was not talking about the process of composition, sorry if my post was confusing; actually, I was commending people's passion when they express their taste in a constructive way. However, as you say, this also relies on my own subjective perceptions on what I consider as passionate and what I don't, as well as what I call 'constructive', for that matter. I suppose I'll just say I enjoy it when I can share their enthusiasm or their distaste to an extent, when I can feel that their way of expressing it has shed some light in the work at hand and their reasons to enjoy it or not.

It's a little confusing. Usually, people don't think too hard about that sort of thing, but it constitutes ones of my main sources of curiosity: 'why do you like what you like?' 'Because I also think this and therefore it appeals to me', 'Oh, ok'. I suppose I'll learn more on that once, and more complex matters, once I start to look into the Aesthetic of Reception, as they call it, especially in what concerns specifically to the form of the artistic object, already a tricky subject for most people. Of course, one can't explain why one likes yellow, but one can explain why a tone of yellow works especially well in a given composition.

But as for the rest of your post, I get what you mean. It's what our classes on semiotics and cultural studies have taught us: no sign is deprived of a cultural context, therefore, nothing we can consider a sign is meaningless, and this means that, in a work of art, EVERYTHING is communicating something, the extent of which depends on many factors (essentially the very same that participate in the communicatice process). Applying this to my comments, this'd just mean some things communicate to me more than others when people explain their taste... and some others just communicate a desire to impose themselves.
 
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Evan of Phrygia

WwwHhAaaAaTtTttTttTtT


I was not talking about the process of composition, sorry if my post was confusing; actually, I was commending people's passion when they express their taste in a constructive way. However, as you say, this also relies on my own subjective perceptions on what I consider as passionate and what I don't, as well as what I call 'constructive', for that matter. I suppose I'll just say I enjoy it when I can share their enthusiasm or their distaste to an extent, when I can feel that their way of expressing it has shed some light in the work at hand and their reasons to enjoy it or not.

It's a little confusing. Usually, people don't think too hard about that sort of thing, but it constitutes ones of my main sources of curiosity: 'why do you like what you like?' 'Because I also think this and therefore it appeals to me', 'Oh, ok'. I suppose I'll learn more on that once, and more complex matters, once I start to look into the Aesthetic of Reception, as they call it, especially in what concerns specifically to the form of the artistic object, already a tricky subject for most people. Of course, one can't explain why one likes yellow, but one can explain why a tone of yellow works especially well in a given composition.
I think for me, once I started to explore John Cage and the idea and exploration of randomisation, that reasoning was a subsection to the performer himself and his life more than what he explores on stage. Certainly I would rather someone perform a Reich piece for more extensive reasons than enjoyment, but even so enjoyment at its' core still exists tangibly, and I think at times searching for passion can invalidate reasons as simple as "I want to". I do prefer to see an extensive reason when it comes to what and why the performer does what he does and that is how I approach the quality of musical exploration away from the stage, but when it comes to the result of those ideas, there is certainly still something that can be appreciated, especially when the idea of randomised musical exploration appeals to me so much.

I do agree it gets confusing.
 
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Ayattar

Banned
Banned
There are days when this forum and fandom are fine and enjoyable. And there are days like today, days full of cancer and homicide thoughts. Days filled with people believing in paralell universes where they can be furries. Days filled with people learning about the universe from Bioshock Infinite. Days filled with videos like the one that Coffee posted.
 

KyryK

Well...you tried
Banned
Sometimes when i play games online i make up lyrics about how the game's going and sing them as i'm shooting people.
 

Alexxx-Returns

The Sergal that Didn't Vore
In my second year of uni, I taped study posters/notes to the room I was renting from the uni. We had inspections every term, so I pre-emptively took down the posters (it was against the rent agreement to stick notes to the wall because it can damage the paint).

As I took down my poster detailing the networking of the immune system, a piece of the wall paint came off with the tape. The MORNING of the inspection.

So, with shaking hands, I coloured in this patch of exposed plaster with my eyeliner pencil. I guess, if you didn't know it was there it was impossible to notice, but glaringly obvious if you knew it was there. I passed the inspection and told no one.
 
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BadRoy

Snake awakens
I have a really hard time enjoying my own stories. Whenever I read them all I see are the faults and mistakes -_-
 
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