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Cool extinct lads

The_biscuits_532

big anxious kitty
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ANOTHER B I G M O N K E
 

Yastreb

Well-Known Member
Probably came under Borophaginae. They were big boyes too.

The only other Canid family is the Hesperocyoninae and they looked closer to Weasels.
No, it was still in the Caninae subfamily. Just a different branch inside it than wolves.
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EDIT: Oh, and also it looks like its scientific name has been changed to Aenocyon dirus in the light of this new information.
 
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Netanye Dakabi

people call me queen
Banned
View attachment 102638
Apparently there were some unconfirmed Thylacine sightings the other day and I hope they're not dead
no, they're around.

a friend of mine saw one once.

they look more like a big rat in real life.

they're afraid of unnatural shaped things humans have like phones, cameras, wrist watches, sunglasses, basically anything that doesn't just look like it belongs on an animal.

in fact it didn't even show until he was waering a sweatshirt and sweatpants so i think even buttons scare them off.

i think we maybe force evolved them that way by killing off all the ones that weren't disturbed by it.
 
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Nerire

Playing with Magic
Ahh I wanted to post thylacines but someone already did that.
Instead, I bring you the bear-dog!

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Neither dogs, not bears, the bear dogs form their own family called Amphicyonidae. Nobody‘s really certain whether they were closer to the canidae or ursids, the most commonly accepted theory is that they’ve formed their respective family before either the wolf or bear bois were a thing.
They went extinct by the end of Miocene, probably because of the competition they faced, as canids were better adapted for hunting large prey than bear dogs were. The case could also hve been the changing environment, as large grass plains became dominant (instead of more dense forest-like areas they thrived in).

F




I’d also like to give a honorary mention to Simbakubwa kutokaafrika, a supercarnivorous prehistoric hyena-lion
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here’s a size comparison of a jaw that belonged to one of these bois, and the skull of a modern lion
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Zara the Hork-Bajir

Active Member
How about a utahraptor, they are the size that jurassic park promised us and yeah I know they are not as cool with their feathers but with or without they are still pretty nice.
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JuniperW

Birb Fanatic
HOW did I not know of this thread already?? Honestly, I could talk all day about how much I love prehistoric life.

I’ve always really liked ichthyosaurs. They’re super underrated, which is a real shame. :(

Some of them were even whale-sized, as shown below!

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What’s interesting about ichthyosaurs is that although they bear a striking resemblance to fish and cetaceans, they’re actually reptiles. Yet, they were warm-blooded, gave live birth, and had a layer of blubber under their skin.
 

JuniperW

Birb Fanatic
Allow me to introduce you to Anchiornis, a very small feathered boyo.
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What’s fascinating about this dinosaur is that we know what its exact colours in life were! The fossils were so well-preserved that scientists were able to find microscopic pigment cells within the feathers and compare them to similar structures found in modern-day birds, revealing that it had coloration similar to that of a woodpecker. Pretty neat, eh?
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