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Critique in shading again? pls?

Kookyfox

Bomb Rider
So I've asked for a critique on shading in a recent post on a drawing of a cat piloting a B-17.
I have been given valuable advice and the last few days I have tried to apply these advices to my drawings:

http://www.furaffinity.net/view/15407881/ a rather dated drawing that I recently found the time to color

http://www.furaffinity.net/view/15416138/ my first drawing on Charlie Hebdo's events, there are no furries in this one (made in like 3 minutes I had to get the rage out)

http://www.furaffinity.net/view/15422213/ a drawing about Charlie Hebdo again, drawn this morning, I know that the anatomy is ugly as fuck but I made it in a rush too

http://www.furaffinity.net/view/15423480/ Now this one is a lot more interesting, as I tried a new technique. I decided not to ink (only a few spots) and did not use a light box. I also wrote the text before sketching the character and the newspaper.
I must say I'm really proud of this one (especially the tears) but I'd like to know if it's correctly shaded.

So yeah I would like advices mainly on shading and lighting, but I also would like to know about the colors, the composition of the drawings and the expressions of the characters.
 

Rydenan

Member
Looks good! But I would say two things:
1. Make sure your light comes from a certain direction. That is, shadows should mainly be on one side of an object. You may already know this, but just mentioning it because your shading is a bit hard to see. Which brings me to my second piece of advice:
2. Don't hold back! Shade the heck out of those shaded areas! I know it feels wrong to cover up the drawing you've worked so hard on by making it all dark, but it's gotta be done! Make the dark areas wayyy darker than you think they should be.
Okay just kidding I have 3 things. This one's more of a tip:
3. There are two main causes of darkness in the real world: Direct shadows and ambient occlusion (that's not entirely true but just go with me here). For your shading to look its best, you'll want to include both of these things. Direct shadows are uniform in darkness and usually have fairly sharp edges (which fade the farther away they get from the casting object).
Ambient occlusion is caused by close surfaces obscuring light. An inside corner, for example, is slightly darkened because less light 'gets in' there. This also includes surfaces that are being blocked by other surfaces and thus receive less overall light. For example, where shoes or a crate touches the ground, there will be a darker zone where the two surfaces meet.
I'll try to show what I mean: (I apologize in advance for my illustrations :/)
First, with no shading:
lZxViUO.jpg

Then we have direct lighting. Try to picture your drawing as a 3D object. You can imagine 'rays' traced outward from your light source and onto your scene. Any area where these rays would touch is lit, while all other areas get shaded:
JVUcCA0.jpg

Ambient occlusion, then, will look something like this (very rough, sorry). Just think about which areas are concave/indented and where surfaces at different angles meet. For example, base of ears, eyes and sockets, mouth, where nose meets face, underneath hair, under chin, etc:
gWlDYUl.jpg

Combine them, and you get a decent approximation of real-world lighting:
ohLmJJz.jpg

Hope that helps a bit! Best of luck!
 
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Kookyfox

Bomb Rider
thanks for the help, especially about ambient occlusion. The reason why my shadows are so light is just because I apply pigments with a Q-tip to have a nice looking shadow coat. The problem is that lifting 6B pencil pigments from a sheet of paper is... quite diffcult. I guess I'll need to buy some charcoals to make it easier
 

Crunchy_Bat

Incoherent Babble Master
thanks for the help, especially about ambient occlusion. The reason why my shadows are so light is just because I apply pigments with a Q-tip to have a nice looking shadow coat. The problem is that lifting 6B pencil pigments from a sheet of paper is... quite difficult. I guess I'll need to buy some charcoals to make it easier

Remember that different mediums have different strengths! I would suggest you visit as many a medium as you can to discover the ways shading will work with each, through colored pencil, shading is difficult because they are a very HARD medium. But, lets say you try dry pastels, you will find a completely different experience. Get out there with your mediums, there is no harm in experiencing more!
 
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