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Critique please

tisr

I exist perhaps
15331672@400-1419790640.jpg


First time using a wacom tablet thing, been liking it a lot so far.

Having problems with shading and blending in general, and also I'm really weak in picking colors.
I still don't understand how to get good edges in the drawing, without making it look copypasted into the background.
 
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Maugryph

Member
No worries. It looks like a cat.

I think the proportions look a little strange. The cat's head is very small compared to it's body and the arms feel rather lankey. Your shading is ok but try to push the darks and lights more. However stay at least %5-%10 away from pure black or white.
 

tisr

I exist perhaps
Yeah, proportions are a bit off.

Still not exactly sure how the shading works with color. Something about darker shades being more saturated and lighter shades being less saturated? I frequently like to push the darks and lights but here I was unable to retain the color of the coat whilst doing so.
 

Zeitzbach

Taste purple
The texture are already great.
Beside the proportion, what is off is the focus of the picture. I'm going to assume you work on trying to make things as realistic as possible one part at a time. In a picture, you want a certain part to not be as detailed so they don't take away the view from the focus on the picture. What exactly do I have to look at here? The kitty head? or his pose? Darken one of the them because our eyes often go for the brightest part of the picture.

Beside that, I guess the picture needs to be a bit more interesting but for a practice piece of coloring, it's already great enough. As Schep-tan suggested, I would avoid using black and white as shadow and lighting (like your shirt there). A burning flame of beloved heart casts a deep dark blue shadow of loneliness. Something like that.
 

Maugryph

Member
Yeah, proportions are a bit off.

Still not exactly sure how the shading works with color. Something about darker shades being more saturated and lighter shades being less saturated? I frequently like to push the darks and lights but here I was unable to retain the color of the coat whilst doing so.

Paint in greyscale and then add the color .

As Schep-tan suggested, I would avoid using black and white as shadow and lighting (like your shirt there). A burning flame of beloved heart casts a deep dark blue shadow of loneliness. Something like that.

True, as Zietzbach sugested, If your character and env is painted in warm colors, use cool colors in the shadows and vice versa.
@Zietzbach please call me Maugryph. I please don't use my last name on the forums.
 

Zeitzbach

Taste purple
Oh and another trick, the "Stare into your soul" might often be used as a joke but it's the easiest way to force a focus on something because it's normal for us to go for eyes contact.

@Zietzbach please call me Maugryph. I please don't use my last name on the forums.

Oki doki
 

tisr

I exist perhaps
Paint in greyscale and then add the color .

On a multiply layer? Sounds interesting, I might try that.
The program I'm using doesn't allow masks, and GIMP doesn't work for some reason, so its going to be tedious. Nevertheless, I'll give it a try.
 

Axikita

New Member
Still not exactly sure how the shading works with color. Something about darker shades being more saturated and lighter shades being less saturated? I frequently like to push the darks and lights but here I was unable to retain the color of the coat whilst doing so.

As a general rule, midtones have the most saturation. Highlights get washed out by the color of the light (usually white), and in the shadow there's simply less light being bounced back at the viewer, so color is harder to pick out. That's the motivation behind triangluar color pickers like this one- you can't have your extreme values and extreme saturation at the same time. Also, if your light has color or temperature, your shadow will tend to take on the compliment, which is why warm highlights and cool shadows are a common choice.

Also, if GIMP is giving you trouble, you might want to try Krita. It's free, open source, and aimed at digital artists.
 
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