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Dealing With Change - A Question

JustAlex1997

Autumn the Squirrel
NOTE - Please excuse my somewhat vague wording on the following subject. This post deals with something I'm still trying to figure out, so I don't want to reveal a conclusion unless it's the right one. Thank you for your understanding.

While we all have ways in which we view our existence (whether it's hobbies, politics, and so on), there can be times where what we once considered set in stone begin to change. We may spend years passionately believing one thing only for time to slowly make us question it. That thing can sometimes completely flip a defining trait of our existence upside down.

How would you determine whether or not to embrace that change?
 
Generally speaking, I think it's better to adapt our beliefs as we gain more experience with life and the more we learn new things. I'd go so far to say it's dangerous to believe things that you know aren't true, or commit to beliefs that are unlikely to be true out of comfort or fear of change. Questioning our beliefs is a good thing.

I can only give a vague answer: weigh the implications of the change. Does it improve who you are? Is being honest with yourself more important to you than how others perceive you, or are you reluctant to change to please them?
 

Ovidia Dragoness

Udder Derg
Banned
Generally speaking, I think it's better to adapt our beliefs as we gain more experience with life and the more we learn new things. I'd go so far to say it's dangerous to believe things that you know aren't true, or commit to beliefs that are unlikely to be true out of comfort or fear of change. Questioning our beliefs is a good thing.

I can only give a vague answer: weigh the implications of the change. Does it improve who you are? Is being honest with yourself more important to you than how others perceive you, or are you reluctant to change to please them?
Couldn't have said it better myself
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
How we respond to change I suppose depends a lot on the type of change.

If we're embarrassed by beliefs we held in the past, or realised we've harmed people, that can be particularly difficult to face up to- because changing requires us to admit things about ourselves we might rather which weren't true.
 

JustAlex1997

Autumn the Squirrel
Generally speaking, I think it's better to adapt our beliefs as we gain more experience with life and the more we learn new things. I'd go so far to say it's dangerous to believe things that you know aren't true, or commit to beliefs that are unlikely to be true out of comfort or fear of change. Questioning our beliefs is a good thing.

I can only give a vague answer: weigh the implications of the change. Does it improve who you are? Is being honest with yourself more important to you than how others perceive you, or are you reluctant to change to please them?

Your words are what I've tried to live by, but when that change is in favor of something I've always considered to be illogical, I'm left questioning my own mind rather than whether or not embracing it would be beneficial.
 

JustAlex1997

Autumn the Squirrel
How we respond to change I suppose depends a lot on the type of change.

If we're embarrassed by beliefs we held in the past, or realised we've harmed people, that can be particularly difficult to face up to- because changing requires us to admit things about ourselves we might rather which weren't true.

It's not based on embarrassment or harm, but it's something I believe I've had solid arguments against in the past.

Imagine believing that you've defeated religious arguments only to join that religion later on. That would be a difficult thing to rationalize to yourself, right?
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
It's not based on embarrassment or harm, but it's something I believe I've had solid arguments against in the past.

Imagine believing that you've defeated religious arguments only to join that religion later on. That would be a difficult thing to rationalize to yourself, right?

I experienced the opposite, being religious as a child and then deciding that I didn't believe it later on.
 

JustAlex1997

Autumn the Squirrel
I experienced the opposite, being religious as a child and then deciding that I didn't believe it later on.

That's a little different as, being a child, you probably just accepted it at face value. It's easier to change your mind as you get older than when you've been an adult the whole time.
 
It's not. I'm simply using that as an example as it's a debate I'm familiar with.

OK. I was going to say that people convert or walk away entirely all the time.
I would say the ability to change your beliefs as you grow and gain new information is a sign of maturity. In my experience, many people would rather dig in and regurgitate apologetics.
 

JustAlex1997

Autumn the Squirrel
OK. I was going to say that people convert or walk away entirely all the time.
I would say the ability to change your beliefs as you grow and gain new information is a sign of maturity. In my experience, many people would rather dig in and regurgitate apologetics.

I agree with this. It may just be one of those things where the early stages are harder to accept than when there's been time to get used to the idea.
 
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