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Death

Mr. Sparta

Scale Face
I suppose I would accept my death when it eventually does come, although I'd prefer being aware of it when it does. The whole "dying peacefully in your sleep" thing really doesn't sound all that appealing to me, but that's just my opinion.
 

Mr. Sparta

Scale Face
Maybe we live in a world where the Quantum Immortality idea is true.

Basically you will survive all life-threatening events, but you die in someone else's POV, because your consciousness tuned into a parallel universe where you survived said event. Everyone you know will die, though.

My friend almost slammed a car door on my head. It must suck to be in his reality...
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
Maybe we live in a world where the Quantum Immortality idea is true.

Basically you will survive all life-threatening events, but you die in someone else's POV, because your consciousness tuned into a parallel universe where you survived said event. Everyone you know will die, though.

My friend almost slammed a car door on my head. It must suck to be in his reality...

No. This idea is on the same level as 'relativistic vampires'

The problems with it are too extensive to even begin explaining.
 

Kitsune Cross

**** that **** now! Bitch
Maybe we live in a world where the Quantum Immortality idea is true.

Basically you will survive all life-threatening events, but you die in someone else's POV, because your consciousness tuned into a parallel universe where you survived said event. Everyone you know will die, though.

My friend almost slammed a car door on my head. It must suck to be in his reality...

So your friend accidently killed you in his reality? Tough shit
 

Torrijos-sama

The Artist Formerly Known as Jesusfish
I am content with my actions, and have no qualms with death. If I am content to have to relive my life a thousand times, over and over, then I shall have no regrets, for I have taken responsibility for everything, and my actions have become a complete extension of myself.
 

Mr. Sparta

Scale Face
So your friend accidently killed you in his reality? Tough shit

Granted I probably killed my brother in at least 50 other realities, in many creative ways.

And Fallow, I can agree that this isn't probably true, but cool to think about.
 

Butters Shikkon

Patron Saint of Queers

Hooky

Was hermiting.
It's going to happen so getting worked up about it will do little - in fact, it can even bring the oblivion closer. I don't think that there's anything bad with dying on your own experience. What I mean is that I don't think you just die and spend the rest of eternity in blackness; rather, you cease to even think. Nothing. Shouldn't that be a comfort? To know that there is and can never be any more pain?
 

Lhasa

New Member
I work with history so this is less of a scary idea for me, at least in theory (I don't think about it often.) The trick is to do things in life that will help others, or help those you love. If you do memorable things in life, and make an impression on someone, you don't *truly* die. People only really die when the last bits of them disappear from the memory and records of everyone in the world. I'm pretty certain I'll live on for a while to come after I pass.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
I work with history so this is less of a scary idea for me, at least in theory (I don't think about it often.) The trick is to do things in life that will help others, or help those you love. If you do memorable things in life, and make an impression on someone, you don't *truly* die. People only really die when the last bits of them disappear from the memory and records of everyone in the world. I'm pretty certain I'll live on for a while to come after I pass.

Whether or not the world remembers or forgets someone, they are still dead. It's difficult to get around that.
 

ta1ls84

New Member
The existentialists were an interesting crowd, actually; I too found their writing to be thought provoking.
I think it was Kafka that said something to the effect that the meaning of life is that it stops. I tend to agree with him (if it was him- I remember that quote from college, but I have had a hard time sourcing it). Immortality would kind of suck the... substance of your accomplishments away, I guess. In an infinite lifetime where would be the challenge or meaning? You could try for a thousand years until you got even the most difficult tasks right. And you'd see everything you ever knew or loved crumble into nothingness and still you'd have to go on.
Ultimately, I think peoples perspective on mortality depends on which narratives they choose to buy into. I've observed that religions often hinge on presenting death as a bad thing or something to be feared, but I personally don't agree with that. Death is a common experience that provides us all with a shared frame of reference. We all have to make that journey alone, so if nothing else it reminds us to take joy in the days and years we have and the people we surround ourselves with.
I don't think I'll welcome it when it happens, but I will try not to be bitter or upset, too. I'm an atheist; for me, at least, there is nothing to fear. Oblivion is still a thing. Death, by definition, is the absence of anything. There is no soul or self that will carry on to experience nothingness.
Relish the time you have for what it is. Compared to the infinite number people that were never lucky enough to be born you are very, very fortunate.
 

Dreaming

Member
I'm not scared of death, but I'm scared of dying in pain. I don't fear the unexpected, I fear that the unexpected will kill me unexpectedly (and painfully). It's one of many scenarios in life that'll hit you unexpectedly, but it's one of the few that'll take you out and give you no chance to contemplate.

Translation: Three reasons to fear it...we've no idea when, where or why. Three essential pieces of knowledge for the future.
 

Lhasa

New Member
Whether or not the world remembers or forgets someone, they are still dead. It's difficult to get around that.

Granted, but as edgy as it is to say this on the Internet, everyone dies eventually--Physically. Spiritually, culturally, in memory, that's another story. That's the whole point of my post. If it were so simple as "she's dead, that's it", we'd have no gravestones, no memorials, no flags at half-mast, no historical bio-pics, no study of history, and the collective memory of the world would only extend 50 years backwards.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
Granted, but as edgy as it is to say this on the Internet, everyone dies eventually--Physically. Spiritually, culturally, in memory, that's another story. That's the whole point of my post. If it were so simple as "she's dead, that's it", we'd have no gravestones, no memorials, no flags at half-mast, no historical bio-pics, no study of history, and the collective memory of the world would only extend 50 years backwards.

I think you're confusing death with memory. Can't we read the books of long-dead writers without having to pretend it returns some semblance of life to them?
When you look at a fossil of a trilobite do we feel good for the trilobite, as if it 'lives on' ? ._.

I think people should do nice things for each other, but doing them because you think it will preserve an impression of yourself for the future is not only futile- since the impression is decoupled from the living organism- but it's also a narcissistic motivation.

One can imagine a scenario in which an organ donor, for instance, gets resurrected and tells the recipient 'I donated my heart tissue because it means part of me defies death,'.
I suppose it wouldn't matter whether someone's motivations for doing something like that were that ego-maniacal.
 

Lhasa

New Member
I'm making the case for conflating death and memory. Yes, picking up a book and reading the words of a dead author is restoring in that moment the author's influence on the world of the living. The trilobite is not a good example since we're talking about people specifically here. Plus, if you want to take it from that angle, a human skeleton is not going to bridge the gap because it is not emblematic in itself of the contributions and effects it had in life. If the trilobite wrote a book, the story would be different. The gravestone is infinitely more important than the body it marks, because the essence of that person--the memory he or she leaves with others in life--is transferred away from that person's body in death, and into the artifacts that symbolically represent them. Writings for an author, or music for a composer, perhaps. Why do you think people who study paintings engage with the personality of the painter in their analysis?
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
I'm making the case for conflating death and memory. Yes, picking up a book and reading the words of a dead author is restoring in that moment the author's influence on the world of the living. The trilobite is not a good example since we're talking about people specifically here. Plus, if you want to take it from that angle, a human skeleton is not going to bridge the gap because it is not emblematic in itself of the contributions and effects it had in life. If the trilobite wrote a book, the story would be different. The gravestone is infinitely more important than the body it marks, because the essence of that person--the memory he or she leaves with others in life--is transferred away from that person's body in death, and into the artifacts that symbolically represent them. Writings for an author, or music for a composer, perhaps. Why do you think people who study paintings engage with the personality of the painter in their analysis?

This is a bit subjective, and I think you'd agree it's a cultural construct. It breaks down when it is considered that human beings evolved from creatures which were not human beings- so we would find it difficult to 'limit things to people specifically,'. We would find ourselves asking where the line is drawn.

The frozen hair of a mammoth, or the residual DNA of a stone age woman, both fire the imagination- or at least my imagination, in the same way that ancient hieroglyphics do. I understand that this residue doesn't construct an argument for mixing death with memory.

This is not an argument to suggest that musing about a painter's intentions and personal disposition is pointless- I'm all for that, but suggesting it brings them back to life to any capacity greater than poetic would be erroneous.

Taking the genetic material of a frozen mammoth and cloning it, that would be more of a resurrection, although again we'd have to be satisfied with the fact we weren't resurrecting the actual frozen mammoth. That organism would be dead, even if new organisms derived from it survive.

I can sort of symapthise with the notion that gene-line, organism and meme-line [for want of a better word] are not completely separable, but bleh- it feels too much like humans trying to bullshit their way out of death by investing themselves in cultural artifacts, like Voldemort's horcruxes.

Consider this: I am alive, and you have read my thoughts. Am I more alive? Is there a fragmentary copy of me now living inside your head?
What if I died before you read this, and you didn't know? Would that make a difference- would I be 'brought back' to an extent?
Not really, in either case.
 
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