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Disability Pride Month

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Punji

Daedric Prince of Secrets
July is Disability Pride month. Yeah, I didn't know either. Where's all the advertising and corporate shilling? I guess being disabled isn't as marketable as being a f-

ANYWAY as with June I fit into this category as well, but I really don't see it as anything to be "proud" about. Disability is a rough thing to have to live with, and while it can vary greatly it's always a detriment to a person's quality of life. It is however important for people to realize and understand the unique requirements disability may demand of people, which a little bit of awareness might help with. Unfortunately I know all too well of how difficult it can be for other people to understand what living with a disability can be like.

I am "fortunate" in the nature of my disability being purely physical and not at all apparent to others, so I face relatively little discrimination most of the time. Most of the time. I do get stared at a lot in public on certain occasions, ranging from concern to curiosity and sometimes not so much concern. I have been fired from a job because of my disability, I guess me being crippled was too inconvenient for them.

Simple understanding of people with disabilities of any kind can make a lot of difference. It can mean a lot to someone to know what their limitations are and not push them beyond what they can comfortably manage. E-hugs to all the furries living with or who have friends and family with disabilities!
 
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Firuthi Dragovic

Gamer Dragon, former speedrunner
I'll admit most of my experience with people with disabilities have been of the "LET THEM DO IT THEIR WAY" kind of deal. Do not mess with their adaptations, is what I've always been taught.

Little experience with the ones who actually DO require the assistance.


One disability-related thing that does keep sticking with me: apparently the requirement for handicapped-access ramps is about 12 feet long per foot of elevation. I know this because I helped build an access ramp (sorry, if someone needs the access I am NOT waiting years for the government to build it) once and... even as much as 8 feet per foot of elevation is a tricky thing to fit onto a lot of suburban properties. I can easily see a need like that limiting access to housing.
 

Yakamaru

Cyberpunk musta Susi
Pride is a vice and can easily lead one to become arrogant and full of themselves. Pride need to be reserved for things you have actually managed to achieve on your own, and should be limited in that regard. Too much pride and you can easily end up being insufferable to be around.

Autism is a form of disability, though I do not consider it to be a big part of my life. It is an intrinsic/immutable characteristic and I see no point in taking pride in something of which I have neither achieved or done on my own.
 

Yakamaru

Cyberpunk musta Susi
Any “Pride Month” isn’t using “pride” in the sense of “puff your chest out about it” - it’s used as an antonym of shame. Allow yourself to be visible, to not hide aspects of who and what you are, to ask for reasonable accommodations, type of thing.
What is reasonable is subjective. Other people may find what you are asking for to be unreasonable, at best. Other people have no obligations of accomodating you or your needs either. Believing otherwise is egotistical.
 

Frank Gulotta

Send us your floppy
Any “Pride Month” isn’t using “pride” in the sense of “puff your chest out about it” - it’s used as an antonym of shame
Ah then national pride is a valid response to the buttloads of morons who want us desperately to be ashamed of our countries. Thanks!
 
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O.D.D.

Guest
Never got the "pride month" thing. LGBT+ pride month is just a big marketing blitz these days, makes me wonder why corporate hasn't found a way to cash in on any other pride month. Why a month out of the year to remind people that you're not ashamed instead of all year? It's strange to me.
 

Mambi

Fun loving kitty cat
July is Disability Pride month. Yeah, I didn't know either. Where's all the advertising and corporate shilling? I guess being disabled isn't as marketable as being a f-

ANYWAY as with June I fit into this category as well, but I really don't see it as anything to be "proud" about. Disability is a rough thing to have to live with, and while it can vary greatly it's always a detriment to a person's quality of life. It is however important for people to realize and understand the unique requirements disability may demand of people, which a little bit of awareness might help with. Unfortunately I know all too well of how difficult it can be for other people to understand what living with a disability can be like.

I am "fortunate" in the nature of my disability being purely physical and not at all apparent to others, so I face relatively little discrimination most of the time. Most of the time. I do get stared at a lot in public on certain occasions, ranging from concern to curiosity and sometimes not so much concern. I have been fired from a job because of my disability, I guess me being crippled was too inconvenient for them.

Simple understanding of people with disabilities of any kind can make a lot of difference. It can mean a lot to someone to know what their limitations are and not push them beyond what they can comfortably manage. E-hugs to all the furries living with or who have friends and family with disabilities!

I'm pretty sure the root idea is not to be proud you have a disability, but rather to be proud of what you can still accomplish despite it.
 
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O.D.D.

Guest
I'm pretty sure the root idea is not to be proud you have a disability, but rather to be proud of what you can still accomplish despite it.
Might explain the lack of marketing blitz for it, can't really sell someone an accomplishment.
 

Punji

Daedric Prince of Secrets
Any “Pride Month” isn’t using “pride” in the sense of “puff your chest out about it” - it’s used as an antonym of shame. Allow yourself to be visible, to not hide aspects of who and what you are, to ask for reasonable accommodations, type of thing.
I'm pretty sure the root idea is not to be proud you have a disability, but rather to be proud of what you can still accomplish despite it.
A land exists between being ashamed of oneself and being proud of what he has done.

I was born with my disability. I have always had it and always will have it. It is almost demeaning to suggest a person ought to be proud of achieving the same things as other people in spite of disability. I know nothing else than this, and it can be almost insulting to suggest I should be proud of accomplishing things a lot of other people do. It may be more difficult but life doesn't really care what it takes to get somewhere.

This is the point of disability "pride" in my opinion. Not treating the disabled any differently beyond the necessary accommodations. Patting them on the back for doing relatively simple things in life doesn't help much. "The soft bigotry of low expectations" as it were.
 

Yakamaru

Cyberpunk musta Susi
Term of the day: Soft bigotry of low expectations.

First people want a whole month dedicated to them, and now this. Do people want to be treated equally, or differently? You can't have both.
 

Mambi

Fun loving kitty cat
A land exists between being ashamed of oneself and being proud of what he has done.

I was born with my disability. I have always had it and always will have it. It is almost demeaning to suggest a person ought to be proud of achieving the same things as other people in spite of disability. I know nothing else than this, and it can be almost insulting to suggest I should be proud of accomplishing things a lot of other people do. It may be more difficult but life doesn't really care what it takes to get somewhere.

This is the point of disability "pride" in my opinion. Not treating the disabled any differently beyond the necessary accommodations. Patting them on the back for doing relatively simple things in life doesn't help much. "The soft bigotry of low expectations" as it were.

I'm not sure about that really. Let's look at simple examples of a physical and mental disability.

Let's say you're blind. Your day-to-day life is probably to the same degree that most people's is assuming you're used to it by now. BUT you clearly are living in a world that is not built for the blind, and thus accomplishing some pretty basic stuff IS quite the achievement, and one that deserves some recognition.

Or take the Ripley's story of a woman both without both arms. To her, getting dressed by herself and learning how to drive was quite the accomplishment to be proud of in itself! Hell, just try to picture how she wipes her butt after pooping and you'll see she's got lots to brag about. She's even raising a child, diapers and all! But to the rest of the world, that's pretty basic stuff.

Now let's get into mental disabilities. Easy one, a clinically depressed person deserves a medal for just mustering the will to wake up and bother to shower somedays. Someone with learning issues catching onto basic math is an accomplishment that nobody else would give a crap about.


There is a bigotry of low expectations...becasue that's what a disability is. If someone did not have it, they'd be like everyone else right? That's literally the point...they have an extra hardship imposed upon them unnecesarily by life. Look, the best comparison I can make is this: When an adult tells you they built a shed in the backyard from scratch, you'd think "cool, nice job". But if your toddler son told you the exact same thing, you'd be calling the media and Guinness world records! <giggle>
 

ben909

vaporeon character is busy so coffee mushroom now
Term of the day: Soft bigotry of low expectations.

First people want a whole month dedicated to them, and now this. Do people want to be treated equally, or differently? You can't have both.
people cannot live without their themed months, so they make new ones when they run out

especially when it can be used for popularity and to sell things
 

Troj

Your Friendly Neighborhood Dino Therapist
It's very simple, really:

It is immensely healthy and remoralizing to discover a sense of "pride" after one has historically been told that one is inferior, shameful, and worthless. In these cases, the pride is in having managed to survive, thrive, and discover a sense of self-acceptance and self-love in the face of great resistance. The refusal to be simply erased or to internalize the world's hatred of you is the accomplishment here.

That is what movements like Queer Pride, Disabled Pride, Autistic Pride, Black Pride, etc., etc. ,etc. are fundamentally about.

It should not be confused with over-confident dick-wavers continuing to wave their dicks around and congratulate themselves for non-accomplishments like rooting for a particular sports team or being born on a patch of dirt claimed by some country.

It's a pity that Disability Pride doesn't get more attention---heck, even I didn't know it was a thing, and I'm disabled---but maybe it'll build up more momentum and visibility over time.
 
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O.D.D.

Guest
Now let's get into mental disabilities. Easy one, a clinically depressed person deserves a medal for just mustering the will to wake up and bother to shower somedays.
Bipolar type II here and if you try giving me a medal I'll nail it to your forehead. I will NOT be measured by my disability and I do NOT appreciate being patted on the head for reaching a baseline of functionality. If you can even TELL what I am, I'm slipping up.
 

TyraWadman

The Brutally Honest Man-Child
I didn't even know it was a thing until this post. XD

If you aren't disabled now, you likely will be (in some way) if you live long enough to die of old age. Nothing wrong with taking pride in your accomplishments, no matter how insignificant they may seem to others. It doesn't have to come in the form of a parade. It can just be a little calendar reminder on a day where you're all by yourself.

Compassion for others, and yourself, shouldn't mean you're bigoted or egotistical. I wouldnt just slam the door on some old lady hobbling in behind me. I'm certainly not gonna call the news channel every time I take something down from the top shelf for everyone.
 

DieselPowered

Well-Known Member
What is reasonable is subjective. Other people may find what you are asking for to be unreasonable, at best. Other people have no obligations of accomodating you or your needs either. Believing otherwise is egotistical.
As it relates to these forms of pride, the point is for people to not be disrespected because of intrinsic/immutable characteristics they have. That's not exactly unreasonable. In regards to not being under obligations, true. However, when that argument is applied to this scenario all it does is validate the thinking of people who would see, and potentially treat, you as lesser for being autistic.

For instance. I'm under no obligation to treat you with dignity if i ever see you "sperg out", i can just mock you for being an autist.
But that would make me a cunt, wouldn't it?

Pride events shouldn't need to happen, but as long as people are made to feel ashamed of who they are these events will be around.
Gay pride commemorates Stonewall, after all.
 
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Troj

Your Friendly Neighborhood Dino Therapist
Some of you have made a really important point here, which is that the whole idea of Disability Pride is at serious risk for being appropriated by the normies and turned into fodder for Inspiration Porn. I hate people telling me I'm an "inspiration" because they've never seen a disabled person order a cup of coffee before, and I hate being pitied or condescended to generally.

The tricky balancing act is that I ideally want people to recognize that my disability is an essential part of me without defining and judging me solely based on it, and I want them to be willing and ready to provide accommodations without treating me with condescending kid gloves.
 
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RogueNoodle

toe bean enthusiast
Term of the day: Soft bigotry of low expectations.

First people want a whole month dedicated to them, and now this. Do people want to be treated equally, or differently? You can't have both.
Perhaps this is just me, but I have always personally viewed these months as a time to educate myself. I'm not a fan of shallow corporate shilling and such. I don't think there's anything inherently wrong with saying 'hey let's take some time to reflect on xyz.' I will say that I wish to some degree that these month weren't 'necessary.' I don't think these months, at their core, are meant to cause any harm. However, there will always be those who take it to the extreme on both sides! Such is the way of humans.

That being said, as someone who is LGBT+ and has disabilities, I've never really gone out of my way to 'celebrate' these months. I've more enjoyed the discussion they've kicked up and how it makes it a bit easier to find folks like me! Then again the internet is so vast that a quick Google search could do the same lol
 

TyraWadman

The Brutally Honest Man-Child
Some of you have made a really important point here, which is that the whole idea of Disability Pride is at serious risk for being appropriated by the normies and turned into fodder for Inspiration Porn. I hate people telling me I'm an "inspiration" because they've never seen a disabled person order a cup of coffee before, and I hate being pitied or condescended to generally.

People can be cunts on both sides. I asked someone who was deaf if he would like me to order his drink with mine. He was acting like I'd just insulted him because he could just write his order down. It was never my intention I just wanted to low-key pay for his drink. We don't talk anymore. XD

Omg DEAF not DEAD phone stop****
 
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O.D.D.

Guest
Everyone has shit to deal with. Some have more than others. Hard and fast rule about life in general is that when the chips are down the only person you can actually count on is yourself. You have a problem, you better have more of a plan than asking someone else for help because all that "support" from "allies" will evaporate like rubbing alcohol on a sidewalk in the July sun. Everyone is an ally until it involves actual work and potential bad feels.
 
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