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What story-telling medium do you prefer?

  • Comic/Graphic Novel

    Votes: 15 24.6%
  • Book

    Votes: 16 26.2%
  • Visual Novel/Interactive Novel

    Votes: 4 6.6%
  • Video-Game(s)

    Votes: 20 32.8%
  • Other (feel free to comment!)

    Votes: 6 9.8%

  • Total voters
    61

pupsicle-c

berries & cream
Like the title says, this is a discussion thread for what you feel is the best/your personal favorite kind of story-telling medium. Do you like comics best? Novels, maybe? What about visual/interactive novels, or video-games in general?

If you have any other personal favorites, like podcasts, video series', or any other kind of creative method you don't see listed above, please feel free to comment which, why, and how you feel that your choice makes for the best kind of story-telling medium!
 

Jay98

The violent man-eater
visual novel.

i love all the alterative endings
 
I liked the story telling of life is strange, the characters and story were well detailed imo
 

Connor J. Coyote

¥otie ¥otezer
For me, I enjoy reading just about everything; paperback novels, old-fashioned library books, online stories (blogs, etc.), and even children's books. You name it - I'll read it, so long as it has an interesting story that appeals to me.

Of course, DVD's, online videos, and such is included also.
 

Nihles

Pet foxxo
I prefer reading when I can, but I'm lazy. Most of my media consumption is TV and movies.

However, many of my favorite stories were ones I helped tell from improv and role-playing, either online or at the DnD table.
 

Reiv

I still have problems accepting that I'm a furry
Video games all the times. Either something like Tales of Berseria where you don't have too much impact in the story you just experience it or something like a Telltale game where your choices matters. I just love video game story telling in all ways.

Next to it is comics.
 

Simo

Professional Watermelon Farmer
Definitely books; there's a wider variety of topics than any other medium, spanning a greater number of epochs of history. Comics and graphic novels are a close second, though that's a hard comparison to make, as I love them both in different ways. Though as one who majored in English, and works in a library...well, books are sort of the obvious choice :p

I'm always discovering new authors and new genres, both of fiction, and nonfiction, some new and some quite old...but the vastness of printed books is amazing, both in scope and era. I tend to read a lot of 20th century lit, but will also read some things more for fun; I'll have to try to make some lists, sometime, but it's hard to know, where to start : )

But some authors that stand out from about 1900 to present: Stephen Crane, D.H. Lawrence, Flannery O'Connor, Eudora Welty, W. Somerset Maugham, Katherine Anne Porter, Ernest Hemingway, Franz Kafka, Joyce Carol Oates, Kobo Abe, Yukio Mishima, Amos Tutuola, Donald Barthleme, Theodore Dreiser, Frank Norris, Raymond Carver, Raymond Chandler...

also, I like to still read 'classic' YA fiction, especially outdoorsy stuff, like:

Hatchet, Dog Song, The Beet Fields-Gary Paulsen
Julie of the Wolves, My Side of the Mountain-Jean Craighead George
Where the Red Fern Grows-Wilson Rawls
 
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Yakamaru

Mr. Villanous charm
Hmm... Hard choice, but I'd have to say books.
 
I

Infrarednexus

Guest
I was always a fan of comic books. My dad collected hundreds of Marvel and DC comics growing up, and gave them to me to read as a kid. I enjoyed every single page, and developed a love for super powers, heroes, and science fiction. They weren't as detailed, but the art was amazing and the characters where so cool looking when I was a kid.
 

MadKiyo

Imma bat in yer rafters
Books, but ones with some illustrations. It drives me nuts when I find a good book but I can't visualize it in a way that I like, so I prefer to have some frame of reference for important characters, places, or objects.
 
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Simo

Professional Watermelon Farmer
Hmmm...from the results of this poll looks like I'll be unplugging some video games and sending some furs to the library! :p (And also not letting them log onto the computers there!)
 

Simo

Professional Watermelon Farmer
The book is the rawest form. The story carries itself, there's no need for art to compensate what it lacks.

that and they smell good.

Also, old comic books have a really nice smell about them, like ones from the 1940s-1960s. It might also be because of their scarcity and value :p But they do have a wonderful, nostalgic scent about them. I've always collected many paper things: books, comics, certain magazines (like Dr. Who magazine from the 1970s-80s), old maps, stock certificates, postcards, travel brochures &c., &c.
 

zenmaldita

always hungry
Also, old comic books have a really nice smell about them, like ones from the 1940s-1960s. It might also be because of their scarcity and value :p But they do have a wonderful, nostalgic scent about them. I've always collected many paper things: books, comics, certain magazines (like Dr. Who magazine from the 1970s-80s), old maps, stock certificates, postcards, travel brochures &c., &c.
Yes! The older--yellower, the better! It has a nice earthy scent that reminds you of peaceful times reading by the window with a good breeze.

Sadly, my copy of Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children was printed in 2013 and it smells like .....dissapointment. Like rotten eggs in hot plastic. It was sad. Good thing the story was good.
 

McStuffy

Avid Fan of all Things Fooly and Cooly
If I had more time to, I'd read a crap ton of books of all kinds like how I used to.

But as it stands, I personally am impressed with the plots and narratives that I see in games I like (namely games like Persona 3, The World Ends With You, Shin Megami Tensei: Nocturne and many other Shin Megami Tensei games). But why I prefer games compared to most other mediums is because the programmers and designers created a whole fleshed out world for the player to explore visually as well as tangibly interact with. And what's even better about that is the player plays an active part in the whole process. The plot revolves around the players actions and nothing progresses unless you choose to progress; you are the literal character in the story you're playing

While I love getting into good stories no matter what medium they stem from, games have to be probably the most innovative medium for story telling.
 

Shadow of Bucephalus

Banned
Banned
'Oral Tradition' (stahp yer snickerin'!)
The fondest memory/ies I can dredge-up from my youth, was sitting around a campfire and listening to an 'Elder' tell a story. Ghost story, or just a good ole' fashioned tail,,, err,,, tale, didn't matter... The crackling of the fire, the scent of wood smoke, nibbling on s'mores an' sipping kool-aid (or whatever), laying on a good old beat-up blanket to keep the bugs away (didn't work, but that's what we were told)...
A deep sense of 'Belonging', and with the stories a respect for our Elder(s) and appreciation for the things they had seen and lived through, or what others had done.

Such moments were extremely rare in my life, and I cherish each and every one of them.

;-)
 

Anjeka

Eli
I really like comic books/graphic novels the best - I get to be immersed in a story AND enjoy art. It overlaps with video games a little bit, but video games usually rely on the input from the player/player character, which alters the required way of telling the story.
 

Simo

Professional Watermelon Farmer
'Oral Tradition' (stahp yer snickerin'!)
The fondest memory/ies I can dredge-up from my youth, was sitting around a campfire and listening to an 'Elder' tell a story. Ghost story, or just a good ole' fashioned tail,,, err,,, tale, didn't matter... The crackling of the fire, the scent of wood smoke, nibbling on s'mores an' sipping kool-aid (or whatever), laying on a good old beat-up blanket to keep the bugs away (didn't work, but that's what we were told)...
A deep sense of 'Belonging', and with the stories a respect for our Elder(s) and appreciation for the things they had seen and lived through, or what others had done.

Such moments were extremely rare in my life, and I cherish each and every one of them.

;-)

That's a great one to mention, and I'm also quite fond of it. It's something I'd like to see more of, all in all.

Reminds me of an interview with the author Gary Paulsen, in the NYT I saw, and very much liked, where he touches on just that image, of sitting around the fire, telling tales:

excerpt:

Mr. Paulsen is a prodigious ranter of the Luddite persuasion; it takes little to set him off. The Internet: “It’s just stupid, faster.” Lawyers: “Miserable human beings.” Organized sports: “Mindless dreck!” Television: “Intellectual carbon monoxide, but hey, TV’s are fun to shoot!”

He grew up poor and lonely in the small town of Thief River Falls, Minn. “My folks were the town drunks,” he says. “We lived in this grubby apartment building. My parents were brutal to each other, so I slept in the basement by an old coal-fired furnace.” He pretended to sell newspapers in pubs, raking the drunks’ money off the bar into his pockets when they were good and juiced. “I became a street kid,” he says. “Occasionally I’d live with aunts or uncles, then I’d run away to live in the woods, trapping and hunting game to survive. The wilderness pulled at me; still does.”

He said he was 13 when he stepped into a library for the first time. It was a frigid winter night. The library stayed open until 9 p.m., and its gold-tinted windows looked invitingly warm.

“The librarian typed my name on a card,” he remembers. “I looked at it and somehow that made me somebody.

Mr. Paulsen became a voracious reader, but not much of a student. “School didn’t work for me. I hated it,” he says. At 17, he forged his father’s signature to join the Army. Once, while he was testing missiles at White Sands, N.M., a Nike Ajax missed its target, locking onto a tagged buzzard instead.

In early 1965, he packed his Volkswagen Bug and drove to Hollywood, where he helped write dialogue for the television series “Mission: Impossible,” and the 1969 Steve McQueen film “The Reivers.” Then Mr. Paulsen left. “I started to like it too much,” he says.

In 1966, he checked himself into a cabin in the Minnesota woods, where he wrote his first book, “Some Birds Don’t Fly,” a collection of humorous essays about the missile industry....



“I’m a teller of stories,” he says. “I put bloody skins on my back and dance around the fire, and I say what the hunt was like. It’s not erudite; it’s not intellectual. I sail, run dogs, ride horses, play professional poker and tell stories about the stuff I’ve been through. And I’m still a romantic; I still want Bambi to make it out of the fire.”

Mr. Paulsen stopped writing for adults 10 years ago. “It’s artistically fruitless,” he fumes. “Adults are locked into car payments and divorces and work. They haven’t got time to think fresh. Name the book that made the biggest impression on you. I bet you read it before you hit puberty. In the time I’ve got left, I intend to write artistic books — for kids — because they’re still open to new ideas.”

Full interview:

www.nytimes.com: The real-life and literary adventures of the author Gary Paulsen
 
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