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Dog Training Tools

What do you use/like?

  • Martingale

    Votes: 2 16.7%
  • Chain collar

    Votes: 3 25.0%
  • Halti/Gentle Leader

    Votes: 3 25.0%
  • Front-clip harness

    Votes: 5 41.7%
  • Prong collar

    Votes: 4 33.3%
  • E-collar

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    12

Volkodav

Dad****er
Hello FA Forums, I am back with some questions.
This is just a general quiz, just wondering what the closest my pathetic self can come to "general public" thinks about certain dog training tools. I will list training tools, what they do/how they work, and would like for you to select what you use or support, and then comment why.

Choke chain/check chain/chain collar
When someone mentions "training collar", I believe this is the collar that comes to mind first. This is a very common and cheap training device, so cheap infact that it can be purchased at the dollar store!.
7ujp.jpg

There are also nylon collars in the same style
q2l6.jpg

The correct use of a chain collar is to be placed at the top of the neck (NOT loose, down at the bottom of the neck like a necklace). The issue with fitting chain collars properly is that you can't simply unclip and reclip the collar to get a snug fit, so they are very, very commonly mis-sized. The collar is clipped to the leash and you give it a very quick "pop" of the leash, for half a second to give the correction. This is not a collar that is used to choke your dog out while it drags you down the street, but unfortunately, this is how most people use them.

Halti/Gentle Leader
A Halti or Gentle Leader (not the same thing, but very very similar looking and work the same way) works in the same way that a horse halter works, where the dog/horse's head turns, the body will follow. The correct fit of a Halti or a Gentle Leader is to have the neck strap tightened so that you can barely fit one finger underneath, right at the very top of the neck, behind the occiput of the skull. The nose strap goes around the muzzle, and is tightened just enough so that if you are to pull the strap forward, it can just barely touch the fleshy part of the dog's nose. These collars are not suitable for brachycephalic dogs for obvious reasons.
You do not give corrections with Haltis/GL, the dog corrects itself by walking to pull ahead, and his head is turned around.
Halti:
ig9d.jpg

Gentle Leader:
y9b5.jpg


Martingale
While not really much of a training collar, these collars are popular amongst sighthound owners, because dogs like Greyhounds usually have necks the same diameter as their head, and a collar can very easily come off if the dog wanted to back out. Martingales tighten as the dog pulls, and so the dog cannot get out of the collar. You can give a dog a correction with a Martingale collar in the same way that you can with a prong collar (which will be mentioned next). You can also get Martingales with the leash clip loop made of chain.
martingale-collar.jpg

The way a Martingale works:
MartingalePosterTOPcopyright_grande.jpg


Prong/pinch collar
Probably one of the most mean looking collars out there, with one of the most misleading names.
The prong collar is made up of joints that can be removed or added to size correctly to your dog's neck, with blunted tips that go against your dog's neck. The fit is the same as a chain collar, high and snug at the top of the neck, and a correction is given with a quick pop of the leash, or a gentle, slow pressure to ease your dog to move in the direction you want. The collar tightens in the same way as a Martingale collar, and does not actually "pinch" the neck, but provides an even distribution of pressure all around the neck, just like a Martingale. The prongs are meant to simulate the nip of another dog.
kjhq.jpg

They also come in plastic.

Front-clip harness/Easy Walk Harness/Sense-ation/Freedom Harness
These are all harnesses that are used and fit the same way, but look a bit different. The intention of these tools is a little like the Halti/Gentle Leader, with the clip at the front of the dog's chest, and when the dog pulls, he's turned around. There are no corrections given with this harness.
Easy Walk:
wo0n.jpg

Freedom Harness:
vlig.jpg

(The Sense-ation harness is the Freedom Harness but with padding on the strap behind the elbow, because dogs were getting severely chafed from it)

E-Collar/Electronic collar/Radio collar
This is probably the most misunderstood training device out there. An e-collar is pretty straightforward, it's a flat dog collar with a box attached to one side, and usually with two prongs that stick against the dog's neck. The way corrections work is varying levels of either an electric shock (rarer, it has mostly been phased out in favor of vibrations), or vibrations against the dog's neck. These are handy for dogs who are a good ways away but need a correction for whatever reason.
p2kf.jpg


SO
The question is: What collar(s) do you like? What ones work for you? What ones do you use?
Reply in the comments with the above, and if possible, what you are using these tools for on your dog, what triggers him/her, how intense are they with this trigger, does your dog like it?, and have you tried anything else before resorting to the current tool you are using?

Thanks!
 

Mr. Sparta

Scale Face
My local humane society is usually in favor of the harness. I use them for my dogs at home so I will have to pick that option. I don't like collars when with with smaller breeds, I feel like I would accidentally pull too suddenly and snap their neck.
 

Volkodav

Dad****er
Do you mean regular style harnesses? Or the front-clip/easy walk harnesses?
& Yeah that is an issue with smaller breeds, which is why they wear traditional padded harnesses more often than not.
 

Mr. Sparta

Scale Face
Either one if fine for me. My humane society uses a combination of both.
 

Volkodav

Dad****er
Oooh, my humane society uses martingales, which is kinda funny because they are against chain collars and prongs haha.. I can understand WHY but.. lol
 

SierraCanine

Wolves unite..... oO CHICKEN!!
As a dog trainer I use what ever my client is most comfortable using... I have used all of the above though personally I prefer a "check" chain with the leash clipped to both ends and to the ID collar to prevent it from tightening. It creates the illusion of having a correction collar on but without the associated risk of misuse. Just remember the tool is only a means to an end. If you don't know what you are doing you probably would be best to seek help. Every dog is different and what works for one animal may have absolutely no effect on another.

(( This in no way constitutes legal advice... take it with your own risk... I've never lost a dog fight.. yet))
 

Willow

FAF's #1 Terrorist
I don't think I've ever really done much training with the dogs I've had aside from the obvious housebreaking them. My dad bought a shock collar once but we never got around to actually using it.

I miss having a dog though. :I
 
D

Deleted member 82554

Guest
My sister uses a radio collar for training her dogs to stay inside the section boundaries.
I have used a choke chain for training my dogs when it comes to walking, teaches them to stay in behind or at your side.
I have also used an electric collar that activates with barks, teaches them to shut up.
I have also used a full body harness when walking because I don't like the idea of suffocating my dog after they have been trained.

I also miss having a dog, but I have never had a cat before.
But I don't think the birds will like it. :I
 

Volkodav

Dad****er
As a dog trainer I use what ever my client is most comfortable using... I have used all of the above though personally I prefer a "check" chain with the leash clipped to both ends and to the ID collar to prevent it from tightening. It creates the illusion of having a correction collar on but without the associated risk of misuse. Just remember the tool is only a means to an end. If you don't know what you are doing you probably would be best to seek help. Every dog is different and what works for one animal may have absolutely no effect on another.

(( This in no way constitutes legal advice... take it with your own risk... I've never lost a dog fight.. yet))

I'm a little confused, why use a chain collar but take away it's ability to perform a correction? Why not just use a flat collar in that case?
 

SierraCanine

Wolves unite..... oO CHICKEN!!
I'm a little confused, why use a chain collar but take away it's ability to perform a correction? Why not just use a flat collar in that case?

Because for my dog she behaves properly with or without it.... but she is timid around people who can be big and scary and intimidating.... so by putting it on the person seeing it automatically assumes that the dog needs to be controlled and therefor keeps their distance. Her ID collar is a "flat" collar (( paracord )) but it is loose enough that she can slip out of it if she gets hung up on stuff while working...
 
When the older of my two dogs was younger, we used an electric collar on her. It seemed to work really well for her, and she didn't seem to mind it, but after we stopped using it for a while, she started acting scared when we'd put it on her again. I'm not sure if there was something wrong with it or if she just wasn't used to anymore or what.
 

Alexxx-Returns

The Sergal that Didn't Vore
I only use love and patience when our dog is needed to learn something ^.^
 

Umbra.Exe

Revolver Snocelot
I wanted to get a head collar (Halti/Gentle Leader) for my dog (Chocolate Lab) who was pulling, but after becoming familiarized with our park route, she walks fine now.
If not that, I think I would have got the front-clip harness, had known about it before.

But for now, we simply use a plain collar. Treats get her attention a heck of a lot better than a tug on a leash. (My dog's very food-motivated.)
 

Volkodav

Dad****er
When the older of my two dogs was younger, we used an electric collar on her. It seemed to work really well for her, and she didn't seem to mind it, but after we stopped using it for a while, she started acting scared when we'd put it on her again. I'm not sure if there was something wrong with it or if she just wasn't used to anymore or what.

It's quite possible. Some dogs develop an aversion to certain training collars that cause discomfort, while others get super excited when they see the tool brought out.

I wanted to get a head collar (Halti/Gentle Leader) for my dog (Chocolate Lab) who was pulling, but after becoming familiarized with our park route, she walks fine now.
If not that, I think I would have got the front-clip harness, had known about it before.

But for now, we simply use a plain collar. Treats get her attention a heck of a lot better than a tug on a leash. (My dog's very food-motivated.)

oooh, have you tried clicker training? Clicker training is great for food-motivated dogs.
 

Volkodav

Dad****er
Some more questions:
What tools do you think are the most harmful?
What tools do you think are the safest?
What tools do you think look the most harmful?
What tools do you think look the safest?

(Keep in mind, safe/harmful when used correctly)
 

Ikrit

I'm fired up!
personally, for the correctional ones, the choke chain is the most harmful, because it gets tighter as a dog pulls more on it (dog could suffocate it'self if used improperly) and the safest one is probably the pinch collar, we used them on our dogs to prevent them from running after other dogs, when the dog pulls forward they generally step back after the pinch, what i like about them is that they don't continue to get tighter as the dog pulls, unlike the choke chain. pinch collars tends to only get tighter by a few inches, just enough to pinch.

i know many people think of shock collars are cruel. but dogs don't have neck like ours, it's much tougher and less sensitive to pain. though i personally prefer the vibrating one, can often provide the same effects
 
A

Azziebee

Guest
We only got a choke chain for one dog, a Bermese mountain dog who pulled a lot. I hated the idea but on such a large dog, in practice, it didn't hurt him so much as made him uncomfortable enough to stop him pulling. That said I'm a big guy and I prefer normal collars, best way I've found for getting our dogs to do as they're told is to start off by turning orders they don't want to learn into games.
 

Umbra.Exe

Revolver Snocelot
oooh, have you tried clicker training? Clicker training is great for food-motivated dogs.
I have not, but I'd like to try it. I'd need to read into it first though, make sure I'm doing it right.

As for most harmful looking, I'd say the pinch collar, with all the prongs. But as you said, it applies even pressure. Still looks a bit menacing though. ^^;
Safest looks go to the harness, in my opinion.

What about those citronella spray collars? Are those effective at all for training? I've never tried one, nor thought of it, but I am curious to see if anyone's familiar with them.
 

SierraCanine

Wolves unite..... oO CHICKEN!!
Pinch collars definitely have the potential of severely injuring the dog if not sized appropriately... I mean you are literally sticking them with the pointed ends of a metal shaft, granted they are usually blunt and may be rubber tipped. I have known people though where their dog died just because it was wearing a normal flat collar while playing. I my opinion the safest is the tool you use responsibly and only under supervision. (( which is why I will use any of them at the discretion of a client ))

...What about those citronella spray collars? Are those effective at all for training? I've never tried one, nor thought of it, but I am curious to see if anyone's familiar with them.

As for the citronella collars... They are great but can get rather expensive if the dog, I have worked with dogs like this, likes the smell. They work the same way as a e-collar but emit the scent particles which irritate the dogs sinuses. Some dogs are bothered more by this than others. Find what works best for you and your best friend and stick with it. your not doing either of you any favors by constantly shopping around for that "miracle" tool. You'll never find it, and even if you did, it would be a one in a million shot that it would work the same way twice.
 

Kaizorz

New Member
We've always used half-choke collars on our dogs, it allows for correction without the risk of strangling them. I've found that using a harness for larger dogs to be more effective though.
I only used the Halti with one dog and despite my best efforts he wouldn't get used to it, he would just walk backwards every time it was on.
I've also heard instances of choke chains breaking the necks of smaller dogs? That coupled with the risk of strangulation I'd say the full choke was the least safest training option. The pinch collar looks pretty scary though, I don't think I've even seen one on sale before.
 

CaptainCool

Lady of the lake
My parents had a pinch collar for our collie. She was bahaving like a little queen at first so a training collar was necessary and it worked well. Later they switched to a leather collar.
They never had bigger dogs after the collie. They had a miniature schnauzer and a yorkshire terrier and right now they have tibetan terrier mutt. None of them were really big enough that they needed a training collar, it was easy enough to train them with a regular collar. Later on my mom got them each a harness to hook the leash up to, but that was more for their own comfort than for training them.

I think all training collars have their proper application. Some are more effective than others and it also depends on the dog how effective they really are. But it also depends on the dogs keeper how effective or how dangerous/cruel they are. Because I have seen prong collars that actually do hurt the animal.

Shock collars are actually banned here in Germany. In a way I am glad about that because there were some really nasty ones ont he market that were designed to inflict quite a lot of pain!
I do think that a tiny jolt that doesn't hurt but just distracts the dog instead can be very effective. It's a chance to get its attention when it's missbehaving. But it's debatable how effective that really is.

So I don't really have a favorite. I just think that, as always, there is the right tool for a certain job, you just have to find out which one is most effective and which one you personally find most humane.
 

Volkodav

Dad****er
personally, for the correctional ones, the choke chain is the most harmful, because it gets tighter as a dog pulls more on it (dog could suffocate it'self if used improperly) and the safest one is probably the pinch collar, we used them on our dogs to prevent them from running after other dogs, when the dog pulls forward they generally step back after the pinch, what i like about them is that they don't continue to get tighter as the dog pulls, unlike the choke chain. pinch collars tends to only get tighter by a few inches, just enough to pinch.

i know many people think of shock collars are cruel. but dogs don't have neck like ours, it's much tougher and less sensitive to pain. though i personally prefer the vibrating one, can often provide the same effects

Amen!! Most people don't know that difference between chain collars and prongs! I'm glad to see someone out there who knows.
It's very easy to go wrong with a chain collar, but used correctly, it can be an effective training tool. The issue with chain collars is that most people get them to strangle their dogs into not pulling, I think it's silly.
I prefer the vibrating e-collars as well :)

I have not, but I'd like to try it. I'd need to read into it first though, make sure I'm doing it right.

As for most harmful looking, I'd say the pinch collar, with all the prongs. But as you said, it applies even pressure. Still looks a bit menacing though. ^^;
Safest looks go to the harness, in my opinion.

What about those citronella spray collars? Are those effective at all for training? I've never tried one, nor thought of it, but I am curious to see if anyone's familiar with them.

This is a really good example of clicker training!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZGPSCvmXyRg
The clicker is used to tell the dog the EXACT moment it did the correct action.

I've never used citronella collars, but I would not advocate their use anyways, I don't really believe in "muzzling" a dog into not barking, it would be as unnatural as forcing a human not to talk. Instead, I would prefer training the dog to bark on command!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vtn8NhofOw

Pinch collars definitely have the potential of severely injuring the dog if not sized appropriately... I mean you are literally sticking them with the pointed ends of a metal shaft, granted they are usually blunt and may be rubber tipped. I have known people though where their dog died just because it was wearing a normal flat collar while playing. I my opinion the safest is the tool you use responsibly and only under supervision. (( which is why I will use any of them at the discretion of a client ))
The points of the prong are actually flat, and you can fit them with rounded rubber tips, so you're not actually stabbing/sticking them with it.
Prong collars are training tools only and should never, ever be left on the dog when not on walks or training. They are very easy to get off, as well, which is why I recommend clipping a carabiner to the O' ring, to the collar ring for added safety.
On: http://25.media.tumblr.com/a30ea9b17a88441c482111b5218e8238/tumblr_mwr9epl9NB1qfj6l6o1_400.jpg
OH NO! THE DOG IS LOOSE!! Oh wait no he isn't: http://25.media.tumblr.com/bfe94b011baafe9a4ad352c7c4016633/tumblr_mwr9epl9NB1qfj6l6o2_400.jpg

I've also heard instances of choke chains breaking the necks of smaller dogs? That coupled with the risk of strangulation I'd say the full choke was the least safest training option. The pinch collar looks pretty scary though, I don't think I've even seen one on sale before.
Yes, injury to the neck is actually a big problem in small dogs due to their delicate throats - believe it or not, prongs are safer than chain collars for small dogs.
Prongs are banned in some places in Europe (don't ask me why ;/ ), so that may be why you've never seen them IRL.
 
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