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Ethriol

Ethriol

New Member
Hi, all.
I'm going to be posting here, rather than flooding the forum asking for critiques each time I draw something. I'm comfortable with my art at the moment, but I want to do better. I made the mistake of starting by drawing manga/anime when I was young and this year I have really been striving for something a little more realistic, although I do often draw in my anime style, especially when it comes to furry art.
I shall be posting both furry art and human art in this sketchbook, and I look forward to receiving critiques, advice, and/or redlines.

Another thing I am looking to learn is dynamic poses, or at least something to make my pictures more interesting than a person floating in mid air (The most I have done in that area recently would be this with a background)

I'll post some sketch pages here - they are all recent (oldest 2 weeks ago, mostly within a week):
http://i153.photobucket.com/albums/s217/chainkeepchii/anaandluke.png
http://i153.photobucket.com/albums/s217/chainkeepchii/MedicRapunzelchellandOCs.png
http://i153.photobucket.com/albums/s217/chainkeepchii/realisticstyleanaandluke.png
http://i153.photobucket.com/albums/s217/chainkeepchii/kiss.png
http://i153.photobucket.com/albums/s217/chainkeepchii/romance.png
http://i153.photobucket.com/albums/s217/chainkeepchii/pinupstylesketch.png
Have at it!
 

Arshes Nei

Masticates in Public
You seem to have lively style with the faces but you do want to start working on proportions. As I said (in another post), people tend to work more on the face than anything else because it tends to capture the audience. The character is what draws you in.

You already got a critique and redline on the fox girl you posted. However, it's a good example of where you need to work on proportions.

As far as linework goes, for the most part you personally won't care how many scribbles you put down in a sketch so long as you know what you're going to go for in the end - but if doing sketches intended for audiences, makes sure your lines mean something.

I also remember reminding people that clean lines aren't everything. On your Rickcommission lines are clean, but they don't mean "anything" Take the lines on the pants of the foreground character. Do they really look like wrinkles? http://www.mightyartdemos.com/mightyartdemos-bradley.html

But you also have to remember doing animation style your lines do need to mean something. At least better animation shows this principle http://sevencamels.blogspot.com/2009/05/walt-stanchfield-bookdon-hahn.html

So just some things to keep track of.
 

Ethriol

New Member
Thanks a lot for the advice. I have certainly neglected my proportions when learning to draw, focusing mostly of what I thought looked right and I still can't get them quite right it seems. I've been thinking about signing up to a local figure drawing class so I might go ahead with that, it might help me a bit.
I've also been wonky with clothing/wrinkles. I guess I feel I know it well enough to get the idea across but I never really focus on it, and I suppose that is something that has been holding me back. I'll have to set aside a few sketch sessions to work on clothing/folds, too.
WOW that Lazy Lines thing is helpful! I never really knew where I stood with lineart. I always seem to depend on shading to explain the form of a shape. I can't wait to get to work on all of these points, thank you again!
 

Ethriol

New Member

An observation of someone across the classroom from me (this got lined over by my friend, which was a bit annoying), and a pair of legs under the table. Also a pair of figures because I was curious about how many heads tall I draw my characters, which I never really looked at before (since it was just to look the anatomy isn't fully details, very simplified legs for example)
 

Ethriol

New Member
the one on the left was based on someone I saw in town the other day, but I didn't have a reference when I was drawing.
 

Arshes Nei

Masticates in Public
http://i153.photobucket.com/albums/s217/chainkeepchii/pencilsharpener.png Had a go at digitally painting something from life...which is actually something I had never done before ^^;

It's a great start. Too many people just chicken out and stick with "symbolism".

Lighting can be difficult to read at first and also getting the right edges.

This thread has great info on edges http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=51913

In addition, you'll have to learn chroma and saturation when painting surfaces like plastics and such. (Chroma and Saturation are not the same btw) For example the shadow can be a very saturated purple that is shaded with black. Meaning that you have high amounts of purple the shadows. On the other hand, your high Chroma is how "purple" that purple is. It will be saturated but not be affected with a shade. It's the intensity of that hue. (I know this is confusing) but you'll understand it when you look at something lit.

http://www.huevaluechroma.com/012.php
 

Taralack

Hit 'em right between the eyes
Perhaps if you drew said shaft she was falling down in? XP
 

Zydala

Kisses for everyone!
Yeah, you should get the rest of the picture in first to create context. Draw all elements simultaneously in a picture for a sense of unity! Adding backgrounds last backs you into a corner and you end up struggling.
 

Jw

PINEAPPLE ACCOMPLISHED
As a small little point, I think the fingers are way too straight-- take a look at your hands right now and see how your fingers tend to lean towards the space between your middle and index finger. So they have a very subtle swoop inwards. I doubt that's what you thought was off, but it bears consideration.

Something looks a little odd at the crux of the arm and torso--possibly thicken the tendon that attaches the pectorals to the upper arm bone.

also, I'd encourage you to play around just a little bit with eyes-- they're pretty stylized (which is okay in some respects), but I think your style would work better with a more realistic looking eye. I see you studied eyes earlier, so maybe you could work in a new layer and see how they look when realistically. Also, the nostrils seem very flattened, and I think at a almost straight-on head view with the head tipped back you'd see more nostril. the mouth also looks low. I's recommend, again, you play around with a more realistic approach and see if you can't make it work better.

Otherwise, this is a very ballsy perspective, so hats off to you for trying something like this.
 

Zydala

Kisses for everyone!
chute is looking better. Any reason for the gradient color on it? Just curious :3

Just a reminder to make sure the hair/clothes look really wind-torn and messy when you get more details down; it'll add a lot to the pic :]
 

Ethriol

New Member
The gradient is to remind me that the light is actually coming from below her, since the chute is actually leading to a fire.
I've tried a few things but I'm really not too sure how to get the wind-torn look for the clothes I want...
 

Jw

PINEAPPLE ACCOMPLISHED
Not sure i this will be much help, put thinking about wind blowing clothes seems complicated, but it really is not in some ways. If you are wanting to draw clothes getting blown "off" of people (not completely, haha), then you can expect the loosest parts are going to blow the furthest away. Duh, right?

There is also a trick to finding out what areas will be tighter to a degree. Obviously, if there is a bulge or lump there, it's going to be tighter. But in even another fashion, clothes will tend to get tight points in the areas widest to the perpendicular plane facing the wind. Bear with me. If you think about wind as a waterfall, they're surprisingly similar. imagine the waterfall not sticking with gravity, and you can move it around a bit in your mind. But if you're pouring water on an object, it will tend to run out to the furthest edges more before falling. Wind will do that too-- it'll ride the object as far as it can go, making tension points. A lot of times, it'll stick with the bulges, but you can even find some more tension points thanks to cylindrical shapes too.

Also, look up some wrinkle tutorials. Not sure if this is what you need, but...
http://www.mightyartdemos.com/mightyartdemos-bradley.html


 
The chute still seems a bit off because the perspective doesn't really line up. It looks like she's going off in one direction whilst the shaft is facing a different one. I'm also not quite fond of the inverted saw blade effect you have going round the edges. I'm not quite sure what it's trying to convey, but it's a bit distracting.
 

Ethriol

New Member
I actually finished the piece last night - http://www.furaffinity.net/view/6210615/ - and I got rid of the things (is was a closing aperture and after a while I realised that yeah it was more distracting than effective) and tweaked the perspective again.
I'm too happy is the skirt but I re-did it so many times I just got frustrated I guess.
 

Jw

PINEAPPLE ACCOMPLISHED
you might find this useful for your underwater picture:
http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/2008/06/caustics.html

Watch the fingers-- they are muddying together too much

Also, on your photo ref, pinch that mouth in and turn it away from the user a little more. Watch your eyelid and eyebrow shape (especially towards the side of the head-- it needs to taper and conform better instead of flattening the face) and don't be afraid to make that nose a little longer. I like that smirk, and it's a shame not to use it in the drawn version.
 
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