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Favorite writing style?

HarpyFeather

Writting Commissions Are Open <3
I recently re-read my favorite book, ever, well series more like. It's called Eragon, and is this truly amazing story about this young boy who helps a kingdom recover from a war fought before his time, with a fun bit of magic and dragons thrown in.
Though something I noticed that really gave me just a huge boost in my own writing confidence, is the fact that my writing style is very similar to this published book.
Christopher Paloni has this really amazing way of making a sentence simple, yet conveying exactly what it means, I never found myself even as a little kid struggling to understand what he meant, but I could always really imagine these epic fight scenes, his lore made perfect sense. So I was wondering if anyone else noticed a writing style that they really liked?
 

Baron Tredegar

Master of Forgotten Lore
I also really enjoy the Eragon series. I think we can all agree the movie is horrible. I really like in universe writing, I feel like it really draws you into the world.
 

reptile logic

An imposter among aliens.
I've read that series as well; all but the last one. I found them quite enjoyable. I just keep forgetting that I have the last book of the series close at hand.

Regarding the movie, I was not wild about it, either.

Regarding styles, I really have no idea what other author(s) that my style resembles. I suppose maybe I should look into it.
 

Miles Marsalis

The Last DJ.
I haven't read anything by Christopher Paolini yet, though I've been meaning to read his new book To Sleep in a Sea of Stars since it seems up my alley.

As for writing style, I've always preferred to write in the present tense in the first person. The authors who solidified that habit for me with K.A. Applegate and Richard K. Morgan, who both wrote series that that kind of resonated with me on the prose level in middle school and high school.
 
Gotta give the Harry Potter series credit for the great way it's written
 

HarpyFeather

Writting Commissions Are Open <3
Gotta give the Harry Potter series credit for the great way it's written
It was written well, but it is a shame the way the author is, even if it wasn't a taking a stand kind of thing against that sort of stuff. It would have seriously tainted the series for me in a big way even if I wasn't avoiding the f out of it.
 
It was written well, but it is a shame the way the author is, even if it wasn't a taking a stand kind of thing against that sort of stuff. It would have seriously tainted the series for me in a big way even if I wasn't avoiding the f out of it.
What's this bout the author? I read somethin some while ago bout her gettin real weird but I never paid much attention
 

Baron Tredegar

Master of Forgotten Lore
What's this bout the author? I read somethin some while ago bout her gettin real weird but I never paid much attention
She made Dumbledore gay, which further angered the conservatives, then immediately after that made alot of transphobic comments.
 

Baron Tredegar

Master of Forgotten Lore

HarpyFeather

Writting Commissions Are Open <3
What's this bout the author? I read somethin some while ago bout her gettin real weird but I never paid much attention
Incredibly transphobic comments, and then wrote a book about a crossdresser killing people in a bathroom? From what I understand, even without the book, it's just really uncool stuff in general. Though I did adore the books as a kid, it sucks now for sure.
 
Incredibly transphobic comments, and then wrote a book about a crossdresser killing people in a bathroom? From what I understand, even without the book, it's just really uncool stuff in general. Though I did adore the books as a kid, it sucks now for sure.
Bloody hell
 

Faustus

Well-Known Member
She made Dumbledore gay, which further angered the conservatives, then immediately after that made alot of transphobic comments.
I actually think JK Rowling has been somewhat victimised on this. I've read a few of her statements on the subject and they didn't seem that bad. Misguided, maybe, and definitely old-fashioned, but not malicious. She's finding it difficult to adjust to a world in which people's pronouns don't necessarily describe their biological gender. For an author it is actually a bit of a problem because you have to be able to put this kind of information across delicately but plainly.

I do wonder how many people have actually read the comments directly and without prejudging her, and how many just see the news stories, the massive diatribes by other Twitter users and so on.

There again, I couldn't view ALL of the things she said because I'm not ON Twitter. Maybe there was something really objectionable that I missed.

Unfortunately she's now in the middle of a feedback loop driven by cancel culture and a sensationalist press, so things are unlikely to get any better for her anytime soon.

Anyway, a bit off-topic!

I miss Terry Pratchett.
 

Khafra

Heave away, haul away
I recently re-read my favorite book, ever, well series more like. It's called Eragon, and is this truly amazing story about this young boy who helps a kingdom recover from a war fought before his time, with a fun bit of magic and dragons thrown in.
Though something I noticed that really gave me just a huge boost in my own writing confidence, is the fact that my writing style is very similar to this published book.
Christopher Paloni has this really amazing way of making a sentence simple, yet conveying exactly what it means, I never found myself even as a little kid struggling to understand what he meant, but I could always really imagine these epic fight scenes, his lore made perfect sense. So I was wondering if anyone else noticed a writing style that they really liked?
I see many people here had a similar introduction to writing, lol.

I read Inheritance multiple times, mostly in Polish but I have the last tome in English as well. Most of the story lost its charm on me since, being mostly just, well, a fantasy of a teenager who read some Tolkien. I also blame Paolini for the massive influx of people who keep writing deadpan inner monologues because thought conversations were featured in those books, ignoring what made them necessary in the first place.
But I can definitely agree that he has a very pleasant style. It's pretty but not overly demanding and now that I think about it, I could probably learn a thing or two by re-reading it. The images of almost every location described in the series are still pretty vivid in my mind after all these years.

I miss Terry Pratchett.
And just like that I became sad.
 
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