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Felix Bernard

Chemist, Conservative, Mark Levin fan
This is a response I made for someone on my other post about depression. I thought it worth it to copy the response and paste it as a whole new thread. Here you go!

“I know all to well the problem of anxiety, and living with it my whole life and having had multiple counselors, I know a thing or two about it. I am by no means a qualified therapist or psychologist, but I can tell you what I know from experience and from others who are professionals.

I myself have multiple forms of anxiety (OCD, generalized anxiety, perfectionism) due to my complex Tourette's disorder. Though I may not relate as well to the social anxiety, I understand the difficulties that face generalized anxiety. Anxiety is really a flight/fight response in the brain, but sometimes, especially for me, there is the pre-flight/fight response. A rabbit pops up its head when detecting danger, and then runs off. Same with anxiety, and sometimes in the generalized part we get stuck at the popping up the head part, and such a response leaves us in a state of feeling that something really bad is going to happen. This may be a trigger for depression for some.

But specific to my case is perfectionism coupled with depressive states and so-called "mind tics" - which I coin the term from my having Tourette's Syndrome. The complexity of the disorder is such that there exists a synergistic relationship between depression and anxiety. I get what are called intrusive thoughts, and have them throughout the day. Such thoughts lead me to think that I am never doing enough with my life, and thatsomething is going to happen if I do not constantly "improve to perfection" absolutely everything I do. But alongside that is the response that you have - needing to stay put. This is characteristic of the "head popping up" facet of generalized anxiety. Also there is the depressionwhich causes thoughts of hopelessness and anhedonia. These are in constant battle against eachother and form a sort of dichotomy in my thinking.

There are two different categories of anxiety that I have personally made up: intra-contemplative anxiety and extra-operative anxiety.

1.) Contemplative anxiety is the anxiety of the mind, induced by internal thoughts and chemical imbalances that give the feeling of being stuck on or worried about something (be it contemplation of imperfection, a grade, or an unevenly cut sandwich). What works best in combating contemplative anxiety is what is known as "exposure therapy." Exposure therapy seems rather contradictory and non-intuitive, and it is a very hard thing to do. But I have found it to work wonders in the past for me, however, and I recommend it for anyone who has contemplative anxiety issues. The idea is to purposely induce the anxiety (purposely cut the sandwich unevenly, purposely do something that is imperfect) and then sit upon that anxiety. Look at that sandwich (or whatever it is that is causing you contemplative anxiety) for a long time and do nothing about it until your brain on its own terms "gives up" and lessens the anxious symptoms. You will have to do this every day for awhile, but you will find that in the long run those irrational thoughts that something is not right will not trigger as bad of anxiety. Of course, there are some cases where this exposure method is impossible to execute. But this method usually is the best for those with OCD.

2.) Operative anxiety is the anxiety of doing, induced by external stimuli and stress, but still governed by chemical imbalance. This is the anxiety of actually executing what may have caused contemplative anxiety (social events, homework, etc). This is classic generalized anxiety, and is what you mean by your brain wanting to make you "stay put." There is to this what I call the envelope effect, where the one with operative anxiety looks at the "whole picture" or end of everything (be that being socially accepted, the end result of a big school project) and gets anxious about that instead of focusing on first steps. The way to combat this is to try to ignore the envelope and focus on one paper at a time, even if that means that you have to take really small steps. If you have anxiety about working out, tell yourself that all you are going to do is drive to the gym, that is it. If you have anxiety about going to social events, just tell yourself you are going to drive there, and then come right back home, that's it. This will usually push momentum into the stuck gears, and soon enough you will find the gears working! You will more likely walk into that gym or social area with more confidence. All that is to say: sometimes being "stuck" or needing to "stay put" requires just a little momentum to produce a snow ball effect which will lead to more confidence.”
 
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Niedlich the Folf

Cute Folf.
Oh great, well now I know that I have Operative anxiety. Well this will help me in the future so thanks again.
 
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Reiv

I still have problems accepting that I'm a furry
Can I have a question?

I think I have Operative Anxiety but I'm not sure. What you wrote there fits what I'm thinking.
I fear that what I'm going to do (be it a homework or just generally speaking with someone, or just greeting someone) will end in a disaster. Because of that I want to be perfect at everything I do and stress even if I mess up even little part that no one cares.
Am I seeing myself right?
 
S

Scales42

Guest
Tomorrow is a horrible day for me. I will have to be fully concentrated the entire time and make no mistakes (while being scared to the bone). I really dont want to go in detail about my dilemma. But I just wanted to thank you for this thread. It really helped me seeing the world as it is and that the pressure that I feel is only existing in my brain. Thanks man. :)
 

Felix Bernard

Chemist, Conservative, Mark Levin fan
Tomorrow is a horrible day for me. I will have to be fully concentrated the entire time and make no mistakes (while being scared to the bone). I really dont want to go in detail about my dilemma. But I just wanted to thank you for this thread. It really helped me seeing the world as it is and that the pressure that I feel is only existing in my brain. Thanks man. :)
Anytime! I am happy to hear this :)
 
N

Nakita

Guest
You know, I gotta say dude, I really appreciate your depression/mental health threads. It's something to look forward to here. It helps brighten up an otherwise stressful, anxiety-ridden day. :)
 

Felix Bernard

Chemist, Conservative, Mark Levin fan
You know, I gotta say dude, I really appreciate your depression/mental health threads. It's something to look forward to here. It helps brighten up an otherwise stressful, anxiety-ridden day. :)
Awww that’s sweet ❤️
 

Felix Bernard

Chemist, Conservative, Mark Levin fan
Can I have a question?

I think I have Operative Anxiety but I'm not sure. What you wrote there fits what I'm thinking.
I fear that what I'm going to do (be it a homework or just generally speaking with someone, or just greeting someone) will end in a disaster. Because of that I want to be perfect at everything I do and stress even if I mess up even little part that no one cares.
Am I seeing myself right?

That’s perfectionism. There are some very good ways to combat this.
 

Felix Bernard

Chemist, Conservative, Mark Levin fan
Tomorrow is a horrible day for me. I will have to be fully concentrated the entire time and make no mistakes (while being scared to the bone). I really dont want to go in detail about my dilemma. But I just wanted to thank you for this thread. It really helped me seeing the world as it is and that the pressure that I feel is only existing in my brain. Thanks man. :)
How did that day go?
 

Yvvki

Sassy lesser panda.
The second one sounds more like me but I mostly get it when i'm with a close friend but it's more so because the city i'm in is heavily influenced by crime.... I'm always on edge when I walk anywhere, because of all the gangs.... My friends let their guard down when they are in groups and so I keep mine on high alert.... Which sucks because it really stresses me out. XP

I also dislike going to public places by myself, such as stores...
 

Felix Bernard

Chemist, Conservative, Mark Levin fan
Well, to be honest, I failed miserably, but I didnt feel bad about it. :D I just said "Shit happens" and moved on. And that is a huuuuge improvement for me.
Oh good! I’m so happy to hear you’ve improved :D
 

Felix Bernard

Chemist, Conservative, Mark Levin fan
The second one sounds more like me but I mostly get it when i'm with a close friend but it's more so because the city i'm in is heavily influenced by crime.... I'm always on edge when I walk anywhere, because of all the gangs.... My friends let their guard down when they are in groups and so I keep mine on high alert.... Which sucks because it really stresses me out. XP

I also dislike going to public places by myself, such as stores...
Your anxiety seems a little more rational, though it would be nice if you could relax and enjoy yourself with your friends ;w;
 

KILL.MAIM.KILL

Angry Lizard King
Banned
And then there's health anxiety. Which I have.
Literally worried that I'm going to die or suffer something awful at least once a day.
And it pisses me the fuck off. I know people my age rarely suffer heart attacks, seizures or strokes. I know there's no way in hell it will actually happen. But despite knowing the logic... I still worry about it anyway.

Fuck my life.

In my case it's probably post-traumatic stress disorder from nearly dying. I don't know yet because I haven't been to therapy, but that's what I've been told I "probably have".
 

Frisky1753

狐を殺すのに、兎を寄越すな。
I get some anxiety related to my orientation irl. Maybe I feel like I'm walking on eggshells sometimes when I shouldn't. Also like the conspiracy theory thread, my family life growing up was stuff like that, I don't believe them anymore but I think I was raised with a paranoid mindset that still persists outside of the initial conspiracy atmosphere that caused it. I think I was like afraid to have my own 'secrets' because of all the secret society beliefs they had
 
This is a response I made for someone on my other post about depression. I thought it worth it to copy the response and paste it as a whole new thread. Here you go!

“I know all to well the problem of anxiety, and living with it my whole life and having had multiple counselors, I know a thing or two about it. I am by no means a qualified therapist or psychologist, but I can tell you what I know from experience and from others who are professionals.

I myself have multiple forms of anxiety (OCD, generalized anxiety, perfectionism) due to my complex Tourette's disorder. Though I may not relate as well to the social anxiety, I understand the difficulties that face generalized anxiety. Anxiety is really a flight/fight response in the brain, but sometimes, especially for me, there is the pre-flight/fight response. A rabbit pops up its head when detecting danger, and then runs off. Same with anxiety, and sometimes in the generalized part we get stuck at the popping up the head part, and such a response leaves us in a state of feeling that something really bad is going to happen. This may be a trigger for depression for some.

But specific to my case is perfectionism coupled with depressive states and so-called "mind tics" - which I coin the term from my having Tourette's Syndrome. The complexity of the disorder is such that there exists a synergistic relationship between depression and anxiety. I get what are called intrusive thoughts, and have them throughout the day. Such thoughts lead me to think that I am never doing enough with my life, and thatsomething is going to happen if I do not constantly "improve to perfection" absolutely everything I do. But alongside that is the response that you have - needing to stay put. This is characteristic of the "head popping up" facet of generalized anxiety. Also there is the depressionwhich causes thoughts of hopelessness and anhedonia. These are in constant battle against eachother and form a sort of dichotomy in my thinking.

There are two different categories of anxiety that I have personally made up: intra-contemplative anxiety and extra-operative anxiety.

1.) Contemplative anxiety is the anxiety of the mind, induced by internal thoughts and chemical imbalances that give the feeling of being stuck on or worried about something (be it contemplation of imperfection, a grade, or an unevenly cut sandwich). What works best in combating contemplative anxiety is what is known as "exposure therapy." Exposure therapy seems rather contradictory and non-intuitive, and it is a very hard thing to do. But I have found it to work wonders in the past for me, however, and I recommend it for anyone who has contemplative anxiety issues. The idea is to purposely induce the anxiety (purposely cut the sandwich unevenly, purposely do something that is imperfect) and then sit upon that anxiety. Look at that sandwich (or whatever it is that is causing you contemplative anxiety) for a long time and do nothing about it until your brain on its own terms "gives up" and lessens the anxious symptoms. You will have to do this every day for awhile, but you will find that in the long run those irrational thoughts that something is not right will not trigger as bad of anxiety. Of course, there are some cases where this exposure method is impossible to execute. But this method usually is the best for those with OCD.

2.) Operative anxiety is the anxiety of doing, induced by external stimuli and stress, but still governed by chemical imbalance. This is the anxiety of actually executing what may have caused contemplative anxiety (social events, homework, etc). This is classic generalized anxiety, and is what you mean by your brain wanting to make you "stay put." There is to this what I call the envelope effect, where the one with operative anxiety looks at the "whole picture" or end of everything (be that being socially accepted, the end result of a big school project) and gets anxious about that instead of focusing on first steps. The way to combat this is to try to ignore the envelope and focus on one paper at a time, even if that means that you have to take really small steps. If you have anxiety about working out, tell yourself that all you are going to do is drive to the gym, that is it. If you have anxiety about going to social events, just tell yourself you are going to drive there, and then come right back home, that's it. This will usually push momentum into the stuck gears, and soon enough you will find the gears working! You will more likely walk into that gym or social area with more confidence. All that is to say: sometimes being "stuck" or needing to "stay put" requires just a little momentum to produce a snow ball effect which will lead to more confidence.”
I'm not sure which I have but I have anxiety about telling my family about my personal feelings on things then I go into a stage of feeling useless and a horrible person for thinking this way about furries because everyone in my family thinks its weird and gross I never told them but I couldn't tell them really
 

Niedlich the Folf

Cute Folf.
I'm not sure which I have but I have anxiety about telling my family about my personal feelings on things then I go into a stage of feeling useless and a horrible person for thinking this way about furries because everyone in my family thinks its weird and gross I never told them but I couldn't tell them really
Hey, I'm still here if you want to talk. I know it will help.
 
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