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Gradients; What the hell am I doing wrong here?

Elessara

N UR THRED; VORIN MAH PICKEL
Maybe I'm doing it right and gradients are just a pain to use but the way that I have been doing it, these things always leave somewhat of an untouched(uncolored) outline that I have to go back and painstakingly correct pixels at a time to match the gradient.

I use photoshop.
Then I use either the lasso tool or that other selector tool that selects a whole area at once (can't remember what it is called offhand) and I use the gradient in the selected area. Then I go back and color in all of the still white pixels around the selected areas border to match the gradient as best as I can stand.

Is there a better way? I've tried using layers but that seems to be just about as much work and when you have several gradients all in one picture things can get pretty crazy really fast.

Here is my latest work with gradients: http://www.furaffinity.net/view/5818497
Going over every outline of those fish correcting the gradient was pure hell. The background is on a different layer.
 
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sunandshadow

Impractical Fantasy Animal
What you are doing wrong is coloring on the same layer as your lineart. Don't do that, ever. Put each color on its own layer. This is what layer masks are for.
 

Elessara

N UR THRED; VORIN MAH PICKEL
What you are doing wrong is coloring on the same layer as your lineart. Don't do that, ever. Put each color on its own layer. This is what layer masks are for.

Even with layers though you have to make like "little windows" for the gradient to show through or else it will cover the entire picture which is basically the same thing as using the selection tool just a little less messy, but about the same amout of work.

If it was just like one gradient I had to use that would be fine... but I had 8 fish to color like that so if I had to make 8 layers of gradients, I would have to make several "windows" for the correct gradient to show through to the top layer. right?

...or am I missing something here?
 
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Arshes Nei

Masticates in Public
Sounds like an anti aliasing problem if your selections have white borders.
Also, do a quick mask to see WHAT was selected. It's the box with the circles at the bottom of the Photoshop toolbox right underneath the color selector boxes



The pink shows you what isn't selected.

http://phong.com/tutorials/anti-alias/


With using the Magic Wand
Also the Contiguous options also help on what you're selecting. For example, if you're trying to select with Contiguous on you're only selecting colors with the magic wand that are near each other, depending on the tolerance option. If you uncheck it, it will select all colors in the image based on your tolerance.

http://www.photoshopessentials.com/basics/selections/magic-wand-tool/

I personally used to use the polygon lasso tool to create selections -it was handy when using a mouse.

However, I really really think you should be practicing more on other objects too. Not just photoshop tricks. Because even the best gradients aren't really working well if the stuff you're drawing is still hurting.
 

Heimdal

has a sexy learning disability
Gradient tool is pretty lame for drawn pictures. I would personally only use the gradient tool as a starting point, and manually work it from there. Even if you're able to find a faster solution to the anti-aliasing issue, it will still have this perfect, stale, 'a computer did this' look to it. The only specific advice I have for you is that it's probably going to take that extra effort you were wishing it didn't.

Aside from that, the blending style of the brushes in OpenCanvas are my primary love in digital blending. It's all manual work, but it's not tough and it can look really nice, easily. Beats the hell out of a tool that tries to do that itself.
 

Taralack

Hit 'em right between the eyes
What I do in situations like this is go to Select > Expand and expand the selection by one or two pixels. Depending on how thick your lineart is and how big the canvas is, this should fix your problem. Assuming, of course, you have colours on a separate layer to lineart.
 

Elessara

N UR THRED; VORIN MAH PICKEL
What I do in situations like this is go to Select > Expand and expand the selection by one or two pixels. Depending on how thick your lineart is and how big the canvas is, this should fix your problem. Assuming, of course, you have colours on a separate layer to lineart.

Ah! another good idea! Thanks. ^_^
 

Zenia

Member
What I do in situations like this is go to Select > Expand and expand the selection by one or two pixels. Depending on how thick your lineart is and how big the canvas is, this should fix your problem. Assuming, of course, you have colours on a separate layer to lineart.
This is what I do. Make a new layer under the lineart and when you have the magic wand tool, make sure 'Contiguous' and 'Sample All Layers' are checked. Then you can select the areas you want, and you don't even have to be on the lineart layer! Then like Toraneko said, to Select>Expand. :) Also make sure your lineart layer is set on Multiply instead of Normal if you are still having white sot problems.
 

Stratelier

Well-Known Member
The reason for using the mask button is because in Photoshop, selections are essentially their own alpha channels, they aren't geometric areas of binary "selected" and "not selected".

One general time-saving trick is that if you have to use a specific selection repeatedly, save it to its own channel so you can recall it as needed. Also learn to use the "add/subtract/intersect" modes of the select tools, they help you fine-tune selections. (Say one channel contains a selection in several different areas of the picture; use channel to selection, then use a selection to intersect with the one area you want to modify)
 
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