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Greenthumbs - plants and growing shit

Plastic-Fox

Member
So I just started planting and growing a small baby tree. This is my second attempt at greening up my surroundings on the interior as I think I murdered the last one through neglect. Maybe I should just do a cactus but I want something to grow and be more touchable. Currently working on a bonsai style jungle many rooted tree. He's doing great so far. Growing all twisty and stuff. He's cute and makes my room feel way more outdoors. The healthy corner of the room and all that.

SO any other growers feel the same?
What you planting over there?
Any tips for keeping those plant babies alive?
 

Phyllostachys

Feigning intelligence
Well, one thing I found about people repeatedly killing house plants is that they often don't provide enough light to them. Light level that seems bright to human eyes is often not sufficient for plants, especially since perceived brightness is somewhat subjective. Place plants as near as possible to windows or other light source. Southeast facing windows are generaly the best for growing plants.

I wouldn’t say that cacti or other succulent plants are good as indoor plants as majority of them are heliophilic. The plant you mentioned seem to be Ficus microcarpa, which is shade tolerant(though not shade loving) and tough plant, so I’d say you would have better chance raising them successfully indoors. Other plants I would recommend are various tropical members of Araceae, or, Aroids, especially Epipremnum aureum and cultivars and hybrids of Spathyphyllum spp. They tend to be shade loving and tolerant to various adverse conditions, such as low(ofcourse not frigid though) temperature and lack of water. Chlorophytum comosum is easy to grow as well in indoor conditions.


While I don't keep any plants right now, horticulture and botany has been passion of my life, and I used to collect tropical flowering shrubs and orchids back in Korea. Unfortunately, my mother told me she killed most of my collection when she forgot to close veranda window on a cold winter day after I came here to Morocco. I am going back to Korea soon, so I guess I'll be busy tending and rebuilding my collection once I get back.
 
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Flux3r

New Member
Sage is easy to raise and smells good, but does require moderate sunlight. relatively low water consumption makes it a good starter plant if you are forgetful. :) good luck with the Bonsai!
 

Chuchi

Where'd the time go?
As a convicted plant killer, can confirm, either not enough light or forgetting to water them for a few weeks. Or a combination of them.
Bought a 'dinosaur plant' that only needed to be watered once a month. Accidentally watered it too much. Killed it.
 

Rebel-lion

Active Member
I studied Countryside Management a few years ago, done some volunteer work as well, currently volunteering in my spare time on a a city farm on a community project vineyard, which I have to say helps me practice what I studied and I am in open fields which does wonders for the mind.
 

Plastic-Fox

Member
While I don't keep any plants right now, horticulture and botany has been passion of my life, and I used to collect tropical flowering shrubs and orchids back in Korea. Unfortunately, my mother told me she killed most of my collection when she forgot to close veranda window on a cold winter day after I came here to Morocco. I am going back to Korea soon, so I guess I'll be busy tending and rebuilding my collection once I get back.

Thanks for all the tips. I looked it up and it's a Mount Fuji Serissa. Sorry about your collection. I'm hoping on taking my bonsai with me when I return to Korea myself. It's a beautiful country! I've heard that the food in Morocco is tasty!

Sage is easy to raise and smells good, but does require moderate sunlight. relatively low water consumption makes it a good starter plant if you are forgetful. :) good luck with the Bonsai!

Thanks!

I studied Countryside Management a few years ago, done some volunteer work as well, currently volunteering in my spare time on a a city farm on a community project vineyard, which I have to say helps me practice what I studied and I am in open fields which does wonders for the mind.

Definitely agree about the growing plants is relaxing. I think perfect for people who can't have pets in their apartments. It's definitely nice having something else living with you and greening up the space. Especially something nice with a light smell.
 

Phyllostachys

Feigning intelligence
Thanks for all the tips. I looked it up and it's a Mount Fuji Serissa. Sorry about your collection. I'm hoping on taking my bonsai with me when I return to Korea myself. It's a beautiful country! I've heard that the food in Morocco is tasty!

Oh. Well, I suspected it was Ficus microcarpa as they are often sold trained in bonsai like form and frequently develops many aerial roots, but I guess I guessed too quickly. Serissa japonica is shade tolerant as well, but is fussy with watering. They drop their leaves whenever they are either underwatered or overwatered, but as you mentioned no leaf drop, I think you are watering them right.

You lived in Korea before? That's quite interesting. Though I am afraid it might be difficult to bring your plant to Korea, as you would need phytosanitary certification for your plant, and Korea has rather strict phytosanitary policy.

Moroccan cuisine is quite enjoyable indeed. I developed taste for chicken tagine, harira, and pastilla. I think I'll be able to cook former two in Korea, but last one is tricky. I guess I'll miss the last one.
 

Plastic-Fox

Member
Oh. Well, I suspected it was Ficus microcarpa as they are often sold trained in bonsai like form and frequently develops many aerial roots, but I guess I guessed too quickly. Serissa japonica is shade tolerant as well, but is fussy with watering. They drop their leaves whenever they are either underwatered or overwatered, but as you mentioned no leaf drop, I think you are watering them right.

You lived in Korea before? That's quite interesting. Though I am afraid it might be difficult to bring your plant to Korea, as you would need phytosanitary certification for your plant, and Korea has rather strict phytosanitary policy.

Moroccan cuisine is quite enjoyable indeed. I developed taste for chicken tagine, harira, and pastilla. I think I'll be able to cook former two in Korea, but last one is tricky. I guess I'll miss the last one.

Glad to know I'm so-far at least keeping this one healthy!
Starting a moss terrarium later this week in a clear glass specimen jar with sealing lid!

Phytosanitary Certification - he cant take that test he's just a baby! I guess I will just have to find a baby-sitter to plant-sit for a year. Any suggestions for a good indoor in Korea high rise city type plant?

I didn't live there - just visited for two weeks while teaching for a year in China. But those two weeks were enough to get addicted to the food. MMM-mmm-mmmemories! I'm really excited about getting back there.
 

Phyllostachys

Feigning intelligence
Glad to know I'm so-far at least keeping this one healthy!
Starting a moss terrarium later this week in a clear glass specimen jar with sealing lid!

Phytosanitary Certification - he cant take that test he's just a baby! I guess I will just have to find a baby-sitter to plant-sit for a year. Any suggestions for a good indoor in Korea high rise city type plant?

I didn't live there - just visited for two weeks while teaching for a year in China. But those two weeks were enough to get addicted to the food. MMM-mmm-mmmemories! I'm really excited about getting back there.

Just in case, though; if it happens to drops all its leaves, reduce watering to amount just enough to prevent soil from dehydrating completely till new leaves bud, or the roots will rot.

As for plants suitable for Korean residence, other than plants mentioned before, Muehlenbeckia complexa, Ficus pumila, Peperomia spp., and Aglaonema cultivars would grow well in most indoor conditions. If you get a brighter, south or southeast facing place, you could try growing Fittonia spp., Hoya spp., Polyscias spp., Schefflera arboricola, or Dracaena spp. too. While Alocasia odora and Sansevieria spp. are popular among Koreans(well, at least they were when I left Korea), I don't recommend them as they are hard to keep in their best shape indoors. I'd also like to advise you not to try Codiaeum variegatum, Calathea spp., and Rex Begonias as they are rather difficult to keep, and flowers and herbs unless your place has very sunny window or veranda. If your place is cold and insulation is bad, Ardisia ssp. and Ivy would be good choices as they are hardy enough to take temperature few degrees below freezing. All plants mentioned are commonly found in any florist's shop in Korea, though if you want something more unusual, such as Cissus discolor, you would have to visit larger flower markets, such as one in Yangjae-dong in Seoul.

And on food, well, I am rather surprised as I always thought Korean food was rather plain and unimpressive, especially since we don't use much spices and herbs other than chilies, black pepper, garlic, and spring onion.
 

Plastic-Fox

Member
Just in case, though; if it happens to drops all its leaves, reduce watering to amount just enough to prevent soil from dehydrating completely till new leaves bud, or the roots will rot.

As for plants suitable for Korean residence, other than plants mentioned before, Muehlenbeckia complexa, Ficus pumila, Peperomia spp., and Aglaonema cultivars would grow well in most indoor conditions. If you get a brighter, south or southeast facing place, you could try growing Fittonia spp., Hoya spp., Polyscias spp., Schefflera arboricola, or Dracaena spp. too. While Alocasia odora and Sansevieria spp. are popular among Koreans(well, at least they were when I left Korea), I don't recommend them as they are hard to keep in their best shape indoors. I'd also like to advise you not to try Codiaeum variegatum, Calathea spp., and Rex Begonias as they are rather difficult to keep, and flowers and herbs unless your place has very sunny window or veranda. If your place is cold and insulation is bad, Ardisia ssp. and Ivy would be good choices as they are hardy enough to take temperature few degrees below freezing. All plants mentioned are commonly found in any florist's shop in Korea, though if you want something more unusual, such as Cissus discolor, you would have to visit larger flower markets, such as one in Yangjae-dong in Seoul.

And on food, well, I am rather surprised as I always thought Korean food was rather plain and unimpressive, especially since we don't use much spices and herbs other than chilies, black pepper, garlic, and spring onion.

cool cool cool. I am for sure going to look a few of these up so I can choose my new houseplantpet when I get there in a few months.

As for the food - I guess it was just my love of trying new foods. A very clean flavor to the dishes I had. A passion I live my life by is trying new foods. I looked up a few of the foods you mentioned from Morocco and I think I may try to find a recipe to make one of them. Some of those spice blends sound enchanting. And I bet they smell great as they simmer!
 
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