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Has anyone ever experienced a Panic Attack. If so how do you deal with them?

Wolf-Goes-Brrr

Every second is a second you can’t take back.
I don't know if i can post something like this here, read the rules and it seems fine. I had a Panic Attack a few days ago when i was trying to sleep, i felt like i was going to die (The feeling, no pain.) My heart starting racing (Not hurting, just fast.) i just felt a surge of fear run over me. After reading online, this seems to be a Panic Attack. if anyone who has experienced one, and knows how to calm themselves down, or avoid the triggers? It would be greatly appreciated.
 
J

JacobFloofWoof

Guest
Since 2007 my life has changed for the worst forever. I take medication, trying to learn meditation and grounding through therapy, and a new method I came up with for myself, which seemed to have worked once recently only in brief moments throughout the attack when I was being overloaded with panic, nausea and discomfort is just stop, and almost try to pause everything, basically stand still and shut down my thoughts, just stare and not think, "semi-accept" what's happening, tell yourself that "there's nothing you can do, so just pause, including every motion that is flaming the discomfort, including fast breathing, pacing back and forth, rapid swallowing, and so on", or as I would call it, make like a windows application and stop responding for a moment. It's like being overloaded, and attempting to accept the outcome by just slamming the brakes.
 

Wolf-Goes-Brrr

Every second is a second you can’t take back.
Since 2007 my life has changed for the worst forever. I take medication, trying to learn meditation and grounding through therapy, and a new method I came up with for myself, which seemed to have worked once recently only in brief moments throughout the attack when I was being overloaded with panic, nausea and discomfort is just stop, and almost try to pause everything, basically stand still and shut down my thoughts, just stare and not think, "semi-accept" what's happening, tell yourself that "there's nothing you can do, so just pause, including every motion that is flaming the discomfort, including fast breathing, pacing back and forth, rapid swallowing, and so on", or as I would call it, make like a windows application and stop responding for a moment. It's like being overloaded, and attempting to accept the outcome by just slamming the brakes.
Thank you for the informative reply. I will try that next time, though hopefully there will no "Next time". When it happened to me, i sat up fast in my bed and my mind was racing through everything that could be wrong, like an overwhelming sense of dread. And at the time, the last thing i could thing of was to be calm. Though, I'll try. Thank you, and i hope everything your going through gets better soon and for good.
 

cowboi

DM me your favorite dinosaur
I don't know if i can post something like this here, read the rules and it seems fine. I had a Panic Attack a few days ago when i was trying to sleep, i felt like i was going to die (The feeling, no pain.) My heart starting racing (Not hurting, just fast.) i just felt a surge of fear run over me. After reading online, this seems to be a Panic Attack. if anyone who has experienced one, and knows how to calm themselves down, or avoid the triggers? It would be greatly appreciated.
Hey, I'm so sorry that happened to you - it can really be upsetting and startling. I had a really bad set of panic attacks a year or so back, and it was awful. I honestly didn't recover for a while. I will say, I didn't really get a good answer when I went to counseling and was just told "it's going to pass so just wait it out" which was LESS than useless. I really like what @Lupus Et Revertetur said. I think panic attacks are a form of overload and it's helpful just to shut down all the processes. I would also say, if possible, try and have someone you can talk to to verbally process? If you know what triggered the panic, just back away from it and leave it alone - again it might help to have another person who can deal with it, if its a "deal with it" situation.
I'm sorry I don't have a better answer than that - I didn't really develop a better coping strategy except I just rode it out. Knowing is half the battle, and if you can recognize it's a panic attack, that can help you realize that you're getting overwhelmed in some way and not dying of a heart attack or something. Again, sorry I rambled a bit.
I wish you the best, friend!
 

Glossolalia

just happy to be here
I've had them a few times. The hyperventilating and increased heart rate used to really freak me out (when I first got one as a kid my parents drove me to the hospital because none of us had any idea what was happening). One thing that helps me is remembering that my body has automatic systems in place to take care of itself, and that I can trust it. Eventually, your heart rate and breathing will go back to normal, because they have to. It doesn't make the situation any less uncomfortable, but sometimes knowing that you don't have to do anything to fix it can make the panic go down faster. I hope things get better for you!
 

MaelstromEyre

Slippery When Wet
I've had it a couple of times - I couldn't even tell you what set it off, but I woke up in the middle of the night completely restless. My mind was racing, my chest was tense. I had to go to another room because I didn't want to disturb my partner. It took me a couple of hours of just sitting there, feeling confused and terrified and not even knowing what had me so rattled.

I wouldn't wish it on anyone.
 
D

Deleted member 111470

Guest
Yup. I went to the ER the first time it happened because I thought I was having a heart attack. I wasn't. It did cause some raised blood pressure though, and they gave me a tranquilizing pill of some sort that put me out after 30 minutes.

If I knew how to deal with panic attacks, I wouldn't be having them.
 

Wolf-Goes-Brrr

Every second is a second you can’t take back.
Hey, I'm so sorry that happened to you - it can really be upsetting and startling. I had a really bad set of panic attacks a year or so back, and it was awful. I honestly didn't recover for a while. I will say, I didn't really get a good answer when I went to counseling and was just told "it's going to pass so just wait it out" which was LESS than useless. I really like what @Lupus Et Revertetur said. I think panic attacks are a form of overload and it's helpful just to shut down all the processes. I would also say, if possible, try and have someone you can talk to to verbally process? If you know what triggered the panic, just back away from it and leave it alone - again it might help to have another person who can deal with it, if its a "deal with it" situation.
I'm sorry I don't have a better answer than that - I didn't really develop a better coping strategy except I just rode it out. Knowing is half the battle, and if you can recognize it's a panic attack, that can help you realize that you're getting overwhelmed in some way and not dying of a heart attack or something. Again, sorry I rambled a bit.
I wish you the best, friend!
Thank you for taking the time to help. I have been thinking and it could have been possibly due to stress. I've had a lot of that in the pass year (Not only covid, but it still contributed to the stress as well.) So, for now i'm going to lay back from the bad news, and other depressing subjects.Try to be more happier and maybe it'll help. Thank you.
 

Wolf-Goes-Brrr

Every second is a second you can’t take back.
I've had them a few times. The hyperventilating and increased heart rate used to really freak me out (when I first got one as a kid my parents drove me to the hospital because none of us had any idea what was happening). One thing that helps me is remembering that my body has automatic systems in place to take care of itself, and that I can trust it. Eventually, your heart rate and breathing will go back to normal, because they have to. It doesn't make the situation any less uncomfortable, but sometimes knowing that you don't have to do anything to fix it can make the panic go down faster. I hope things get better for you!
Thank you, that will help to remember if it ever happens again. Thats the same thing for me though, the heavy breathing and racing heart. It freaks me out becoause my mind was not thinking rationally.
 

Wolf-Goes-Brrr

Every second is a second you can’t take back.
Yup. I went to the ER the first time it happened because I thought I was having a heart attack. I wasn't. It did cause some raised blood pressure though, and they gave me a tranquilizing pill of some sort that put me out after 30 minutes.

If I knew how to deal with panic attacks, I wouldn't be having them.
I thought i was too. I didn't know what to do, but after the panic faded i looked it up and knew what had happened.
 

Wolf-Goes-Brrr

Every second is a second you can’t take back.
I've had it a couple of times - I couldn't even tell you what set it off, but I woke up in the middle of the night completely restless. My mind was racing, my chest was tense. I had to go to another room because I didn't want to disturb my partner. It took me a couple of hours of just sitting there, feeling confused and terrified and not even knowing what had me so rattled.

I wouldn't wish it on anyone.
Same, i don't know what could have triggered it besides stress? I also, had to escape my room because i felt trapped in my bed and went into my kitchen. I wish you and anyone who had went or going though it the best.
 

cowboi

DM me your favorite dinosaur
Thank you for taking the time to help. I have been thinking and it could have been possibly due to stress. I've had a lot of that in the pass year (Not only covid, but it still contributed to the stress as well.) So, for now i'm going to lay back from the bad news, and other depressing subjects.Try to be more happier and maybe it'll help. Thank you.
I wish you all the best, seriously. The world can be pretty depressing and stressful these days, so I try to take the little joys and happy things that happen when they do. Please take care of yourself!
 

Filter

ɹǝʇlᴉℲ
I had intermittent panic attacks for a few years, following an injury. The way I first dealt with them was to retreat to my dormroom, a bathroom, anywhere I could be alone. Music helped calm my nerves. Eventually, I discovered that reading "boring" things also took the edge off. Books on law were particularly helpful, despite not being my field of interest Over time, I found that I could use my panic attack time to prepare for classes. Once I started using them to my advantage, to study for instance, it helped me fear them less. As I feared them less and less, they diminished.
 

Wolf-Goes-Brrr

Every second is a second you can’t take back.
I had intermittent panic attacks for a few years, following an injury. The way I first dealt with them was to retreat to my dormroom, a bathroom, anywhere I could be alone. Music helped calm my nerves. Eventually, I discovered that reading "boring" things also took the edge off. Books on law were particularly helpful, despite not being my field of interest Over time, I found that I could use my panic attack time to prepare for classes. Once I started using them to my advantage, to study for instance, it helped me fear them less. As I feared them less and less, they diminished.
Thats great how you turned them around for the better. I’m glad you could overcome them.

When ever I got anxiety, or just fear (Not panic attacks though, being this is my first time having one.) i usually read Wikipedia articles that I would usually find boring. It helped me calm down from a lot of things.
It definitely did help. What type of music would you suggest to listen too.
Thank you for the comment, it does help a lot.
 
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Wolf-Goes-Brrr

Every second is a second you can’t take back.
I wish you all the best, seriously. The world can be pretty depressing and stressful these days, so I try to take the little joys and happy things that happen when they do. Please take care of yourself!
Yeah it definitely has been. I’m going to try to stay clear of the bad news for awhile and see if that helps any.

thank you, I will. And I wish you the same. ^ ^
 

Angelcakes

Well-Known Member
Honestly?

You're gonna think this is really cliche....but I repeat the Litany Against Fear from Dune.

Yes. Seriously.

"I must not fear.
Fear is the mind-killer.
Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
I will face my fear.
I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
Where the fear has gone there will be nothing.
Only I will remain."

And if you feel like crying? Just let it happen. Don't try to fight it.
 

Wolf-Goes-Brrr

Every second is a second you can’t take back.
Honestly?

You're gonna think this is really cliche....but I repeat the Litany Against Fear from Dune.

Yes. Seriously.

"I must not fear.
Fear is the mind-killer.
Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
I will face my fear.
I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
Where the fear has gone there will be nothing.
Only I will remain."

And if you feel like crying? Just let it happen. Don't try to fight it.
Thats not cliche to me at all, if anything I really like it. It has a lot of truth in it.
However, the last part is hard. It’s hard to not try and stop crying, though I have been trying to get better at it. It lets a lot of things off my chest, and afterwards i feel a lot better instead of holding it in. Thank you.
 

Firuthi Dragovic

World Serpent, overly defensive
Any sign, ANY sign of being restricted or limited suddenly in any way, no matter how unlikely or distant it is, tends to bring them out in me, it turns out. Usually it amounts to chest pain, complete rage, full arm tension, and sometimes the pain radiates out to the left shoulder. The fact that I don't get dizzy or nauseous from them is the only sign that they're not heart attacks.

The tension tends to linger for a couple of days even if the pain is only about 30 minutes tops.

Unfortunately for me, they set on WAY too quickly for me to actually stop them in any meaningful way. It's literally on/off switch. Where I could use help is actually turning them off sooner than half an hour.
 

Kumali

Lupine-American
Get yourself to a safe place if you can (however you define that). E.g. if you're driving, pull over; if you're in a crowded room, find someplace you can be alone, that sort of thing. Then, one technique that's helped me is:
What are five things I see, right at this moment?
What are four things I hear, right at this moment?
What are three things I can feel (physically), right at this moment?
What this does is help you stay in the here and now and get refocused in the present moment, which slows the mind racing, which slows the heart rate, and so forth. If one round of those questions doesn't quite do it, go through it again: what are five more things I see, right at this moment? etc.

That's just one technique; there are many more. (Cuddling a big stuffed animal is another favorite of mine.) :) If panic attacks happen to you regularly, though, seek professional help. Therapy and meds can do a world of good (if the meds are the right ones). I dealt with both clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder for years without knowing what was wrong with me before I was finally diagnosed, and therapy and meds have turned my life around. Wishing you the best. (And keep sharing about it if it helps you - you're getting some good advice here.)
 
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JuniperW

Birb Fanatic
Panic attacks are extremely rare for me, especially now that I’m out of school. They might happen when my senses are completely overloaded, or when I’m particularly worried about something.
To call the experience of having a panic attack horrible would be an understatement, although I find I can calm down from them pretty quickly, especially through activities such as listening to music or reading.

Quite possibly the worst panic attack I had was in 2019, when I was out camping with my family. We’d taken a walk through a forest with steep inclines and rocky surfaces - already a location I didn’t like. I’m not gonna go into the details any further, but just know that everyone’s okay and nobody got hurt.
 

Wolf-Goes-Brrr

Every second is a second you can’t take back.
Any sign, ANY sign of being restricted or limited suddenly in any way, no matter how unlikely or distant it is, tends to bring them out in me, it turns out. Usually it amounts to chest pain, complete rage, full arm tension, and sometimes the pain radiates out to the left shoulder. The fact that I don't get dizzy or nauseous from them is the only sign that they're not heart attacks.

The tension tends to linger for a couple of days even if the pain is only about 30 minutes tops.

Unfortunately for me, they set on WAY too quickly for me to actually stop them in any meaningful way. It's literally on/off switch. Where I could use help is actually turning them off sooner than half an hour.
I'm sorry to hear that, i really things get better for you! I also feel the chest pain, not bad though, than i get the feeling of dread and dying. I've been reading about them and read that water helps a lot, so does certain types of tea. And chocolate :3. All of them help with stress and in my case that seems to be what is setting them off.

Exactly, they're so fast and unexpected its hard to focus on the things to calm yourself in the middle of it. I wish you the best!
 

Wolf-Goes-Brrr

Every second is a second you can’t take back.
Get yourself to a safe place if you can (however you define that). E.g. if you're driving, pull over; if you're in a crowded room, find someplace you can be alone, that sort of thing. Then, one technique that's helped me is:
What are five things I see, right at this moment?
What are four things I hear, right at this moment?
What are three things I can feel (physically), right at this moment?
What this does is help you stay in the here and now and get refocused in the present moment, which slows the mind racing, which slows the heart rate, and so forth. If one round of those questions doesn't quite do it, go through it again: what are five more things I see, right at this moment? etc.

That's just one technique; there are many more. (Cuddling a big stuffed animal is another favorite of mine.) :) If panic attacks happen to you regularly, though, seek professional help. Therapy and meds can do a world of good (if the meds are the right ones). I dealt with both clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder for years without knowing what was wrong wth me before I was finally diagnosed, and therapy and meds have turned my life around. Wishing you the best. (And keep sharing about it if it helps you - you're getting some good advice here.)
I will try that, thank you! That would help out a lot so i can calm down. And luckily i have a lot of stuffed animals to hug as well!
I don't think i get them regularly though, it's only happened twice now, but i will if they continue.
Thank you, and i wish you the best!
 

Kumali

Lupine-American
A good breathing technique is to close your eyes and just take real slow, deep breaths, and focus your full attention on them. Breathe in re-e-e-eal slo-o-o-ow, fully focused on just that inbreath, nothing else. Hold it for a few seconds then breathe out, again reeeeeal reeeeeeal slooooooow, focusing your entire attention and awareness on nothing but that breath. A few of those helps recenter the mind and the awareness in the present moment rather than running off down rabbit holes of terror, and the breathing itself slows the heart rate.

The great Vietnamese Buddhist monk and author Thich Nhat Hanh recommends this as a meditation technique, and also suggests saying silently to yourself while you're doing it "Breathing in, I know that I am breathing in," and "Breathing out, I know that I am breathing out." Again, it's about getting your awareness back in the here and now from wherever it's gone to.
 
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