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HELP WOLFNIGHT SUCK LESS!!!

WolfNightV4X1

King of Kawaii; That Token Femboy
Hello all! Incoming rant and bitchfest, so be prepared.


....so...as it stands Im not all that great and awesome at art. Yeah, I'm alright and all, I sure as hell can render more than a stickfigure, which is nice. And it is fun, for sure!

I am improving way too slowly though, and its annoying >:/ Something is wrong and no matter how hard I try everything looks like trash in some way.

So...as a way to amend this I'm asking for a little bit of guidance, and maybe again I can get some help on this.


Ahead will be an extremely half-assed doodle fully rendered in what is usually how I understand art should be from start to finish, due to its half assed nature it will look awful throughout each part, however, even when I do "try", the obvious flaws are still there and its frustrating, so this isnt an example of my "good" art.

Step 1: Sketch

mausketch.png

Probably the first and only phase that turns out well, everything afterwards looks bad



Step 2: Lineart

mauslains.png


The part where everything falls apart because I can never make nice, clean linearts no matter how hard I try. Im on krita now and Im trying stabilizers. Im trying to use the line tool on gimp. Im trying to be careful and steady with my hands. Nothing works. Maybe my hands are too shaky, and the only remedy is practicing not doing that? Or maybe I can fuck around on art program settings? Maybe I just suck to the point of no return. Either way, nothing I produce looks anything good on it's own as a clean, professional lineart. I feel like this sets me apart from artists who even have less of a grasp of anatomy than I, because at least their lines dont look like a toddler with parkinsons drew it, an unfortunate anomaly to occur.

Step 3: Flat color

mauscalar.png


Not much to this, it looks decent...if only my lines werent bad to begin with ruining it from step 1

Step 4: Shade

maushade1.png


Same idea as my lines, I guess. Not straight. All crooked, lack of organization.

Step 5: Blended shade

maushade2.png


This is supposed to look better but I think something is wrong, I dont think this is how most artists shade their shit

Step potato: Background and shit

maushadedone.png


...Yeah, Im at a loss some days what to do for the bg, leave it blank? Throw some weird ass colors back there? Shade the ground with a trippy coolish brush? I do randomness now and again out of sheer confusion.




So yeah, that just shows what Im doing, so now that I broke it down I want to know what Im doing wrong and what can help? Maybe just slowing the fuck down? Even though I feel like I tried that and when I do try to fix it everything looks bad and weird... My main focus right now is to find out how to get good linearts because I dont think anything I make will look good if I dont have that base to work on.



Anyways! Thanks for observing my rambles! Help will be appreciated!
 
N

Norros

Guest
Try to reduce pen sensitivity in settings,
it will make lines less clumsy.

And dont overdo stabilization because of increasing response time.
 

princesstool

New Member
I think you have some good fundamentals here and what you need is practice and tweak some settings maybe. Your sketch lines have a better flow and consistency than your line work. They're thicker and have a stiffer energy to them. For stability in line work I suggest checking to see if you have a stabilizer setting for your brush its makes the stroke come out smoother. Look up tutorials on how to make smoother line art and that should come up. I read that you probably have tried this suggestion. If that is the case I'd try different brush settings all together. Look up what other artist use for good clean line work. For more line consistency its all about your pen pressure. Most tablets the more you press down the thicker the line. As for the rest of your mistakes such as overlapping lines and shaky lines you just have to look for them and erase/try again more often. Practice by drawing the things you're best at, small things. Focus on improving your lines and not losing the fluidity of your initial sketch. Good luck hope this helped.
 

MsRavage

peek-a-boo!!! I see you!
i wish i knew more about digital to aid in that...but since i don't all i can say is it looks ok...you are being hard on yourself..its one thing to provide constructive criticism but to just negatively attack it is no good. If i was in your shoes here is what i'd do: 1. be happy i finished an art piece...believe it or not many people never finish things 2. looking at the final product i'd find things i could use more help in...for you i'd suggest line work and shading to start off with. 3. i'd look at tutorials on youtube...there are tons of them and many people want to help you learn better...its helpful and some really are very informative 4. i'd copy my favorite artists and see how they do things...its always a great idea to learn skills form other artists...you can advance your technique and learn additional ones by seeing how others do things 5. keep trying and keep practicing....

you're doing great! here's a video of someone doing a speed paint of a chibi miku...see how they do it...how they work on the lines and what not (or look at other videos...i literally just typed something in and this was it lol)
 

WolfNightV4X1

King of Kawaii; That Token Femboy
I think you have some good fundamentals here and what you need is practice and tweak some settings maybe. Your sketch lines have a better flow and consistency than your line work. They're thicker and have a stiffer energy to them. For stability in line work I suggest checking to see if you have a stabilizer setting for your brush its makes the stroke come out smoother. Look up tutorials on how to make smoother line art and that should come up. I read that you probably have tried this suggestion. If that is the case I'd try different brush settings all together. Look up what other artist use for good clean line work. For more line consistency its all about your pen pressure. Most tablets the more you press down the thicker the line. As for the rest of your mistakes such as overlapping lines and shaky lines you just have to look for them and erase/try again more often. Practice by drawing the things you're best at, small things. Focus on improving your lines and not losing the fluidity of your initial sketch. Good luck hope this helped.

Thanks guys! I may have to go for pen pressure settings, and keep trying to find something that works
 

LumeKat

Member
It looks like you're struggling not to press too hard because it's set too sensitive but also the max thickness is way too high. It should be the one you aim at in the majority of the drawing.
Try higher resolutions so it stops detecting every shake.
As the world's greatest detective I think the slow wobbly movement is connected to the sketch that is not very confident either. Just try drawing faster, punish yourself with eraser and the undo button, and you'll develop the precision to make long smooth strokes ^^
 

WolfNightV4X1

King of Kawaii; That Token Femboy
It looks like you're struggling not to press too hard because it's set too sensitive but also the max thickness is way too high. It should be the one you aim at in the majority of the drawing.
Try higher resolutions so it stops detecting every shake.
As the world's greatest detective I think the slow wobbly movement is connected to the sketch that is not very confident either. Just try drawing faster, punish yourself with eraser and the undo button, and you'll develop the precision to make long smooth strokes ^^

Resolution is still something I dont quite understand, I know it plays a role and it's a setting at the beginning when you open a new canvas, but I havent the time to delve much into researching what are good resolutions to work with.


Other than that, you all may be right about adjusting pressure sensitivity, I havent tried that and I dont know what might work well for me.


I might have to figure out how to slow the fuck down, too ;w; I can work faster on paper because it's less sensitive to jagged movements and less noticeable, I read somewhere that drawing from the elbow also works. I dont know if I do that and I dont know how that feels, but I guess I have to work in that habit (its frustrating though because as Im trying to practice in, I also want to finish drawing pieces too and I never get to move on).


I might go home today and fuck around on it some more, maybe actually try to intentionally draw a neater piece instead of a quick doodle to show what I mean.
 

KittenCozy

kitten in a cozy
Part of art, especially digital art, is doing it with a relaxed state of mind. If you make art while doubting and criticizing yourself, then you'll wind up frustrated and less motivated to try again. Maybe you could try making doodles as warm ups, so you can get past the perfectionist mindset before diving into a real piece.
 

Tavelius

New Member
Hi, I think I can expand on some things that were said earlier.

Higher resolution basically means higher pixel size for your canvas. If the above picture is the full size you're working on, then it's much too small. I don't start working with less than a 3000x3000 pixel canvas, even though I usually crop the picture. Having more resolution means you can do finer detail, thinner lines, and have more control overall. Unless you're having performance issues, there really is no reason not to go with a large canvas since you can easily scale it down later on.

As for the pen pressure settings, as was mentioned earlier, it varies from software to software, but I found that having both the opacity and size linked to pen pressure works wonders, since something I'm noticing on your lineart, and as it seems you noticed as well is that there's a consistent thickness to it. Having thicker lines in the darker areas and thinner ones on the lighter ones will do wonders to improve dynamic in your drawing. Also, don't be afraid to use textured brushes to do both your lineart and your shading, I started experimenting with it recently and I'm loving it.

From the shading it looks like you're using another layer with some sort of blending mode, and although this is fine, depending on the colors bellow can look wonky. I've recently started doing the shading and lighting in the same layer manually picking the colors, it's a bit more tricky and takes some work, but to me it looks much more natural. Also, something I don't usually take in consideration, your character isn't existing in a vacuum. You have a greenish background, but blue-ish shading, and those don't mesh well. Another nice trick is that, even though the light is coming from the left, the right side shouldn't be completely dark. There's a bit of light that shines through the back of the character, so the right side shouldn't be so dark. What should be darker, however, is zones like the armpit, bellow the neck and other crevices, adding another darker layer of shading can help your drawing look more three dimensional. For the lighting, I like to use a "screen" blending mode for the brush, it allows the creation of some pretty nice highlights.

I also think the shading blending is too loose, there should be a harder contrast between some light and dark zones. I'm recording the latest small project I'm working on, I can post a video of it to show how I currently do my shading :3

Finally, don't hate yourself, you should always strive to do better, but if you learn anything at all from a drawing then I would consider it a huge success.
 

WolfNightV4X1

King of Kawaii; That Token Femboy
Some update, I guess, worked on something else this evening, this time less of a quickly rendered doodle and more of a slowly-done simple image.

I tried to incorporate a few things to see if it helps (Made the resolution 2000, Im not even sure if that's considered "too high", but I tried to work in 20px thickness because I read somewhere its a good res ratio. Not sure if it did anything. I changed the pen pressure setting on krita, not sure if that helped, and I used some stabilizer. Mainly though I just ctrl+z'd everything...)

Sketch

meowsketch.png

The proportions are a bit off but that was not my main focus, it's a cleaner sketch this time because I was focused on fine tuning...

Lineart...

meowlines.png


Okay, here's that part I dread. Yes it looks better, mainly because I spent the time on it...but it still lacks quality for the time I spent on it. Some wobble/shake in the left ear, top of nose, bottom of jaw, irregular thicknesses. For all the time I spent trying to perfect that linework I couldve just used the line tool in paint.net...and it really is aggravatting spending so much time on the lineart and making my productivity of finishing pieces so slow, but I may just have to if I want some quality stuff.

Problem is in most my drawings they arent as simple as this one, so I dont think paint.net works well for those.

My goal would be to get to the type of lineart you see in a coloring book type quality, even with extremely simple shapes, but with how bad these look I dont see that happening :/

meowcolor.png

Flat color



Shade

meowshade.png


Blended shade

meowshade2.png


Final
meow22.png






Still working on it and hopefully if I mess around in different art programs, settings, and amount of effort I can figure something out that works
 

WolfNightV4X1

King of Kawaii; That Token Femboy
Part of art, especially digital art, is doing it with a relaxed state of mind. If you make art while doubting and criticizing yourself, then you'll wind up frustrated and less motivated to try again. Maybe you could try making doodles as warm ups, so you can get past the perfectionist mindset before diving into a real piece.

Probably a good idea, Ive been more recently trying to "practice", my main form of practice has always been just diving into a real piece and finishing it from A to Z, quality always not the best but I wanted to actually get stuff done.

Would be a nice change to do a bunch of doodly sketches on a canvas before doing a "real piece"
 

WolfNightV4X1

King of Kawaii; That Token Femboy
Hi, I think I can expand on some things that were said earlier.

Higher resolution basically means higher pixel size for your canvas. If the above picture is the full size you're working on, then it's much too small. I don't start working with less than a 3000x3000 pixel canvas, even though I usually crop the picture. Having more resolution means you can do finer detail, thinner lines, and have more control overall. Unless you're having performance issues, there really is no reason not to go with a large canvas since you can easily scale it down later on.

As for the pen pressure settings, as was mentioned earlier, it varies from software to software, but I found that having both the opacity and size linked to pen pressure works wonders, since something I'm noticing on your lineart, and as it seems you noticed as well is that there's a consistent thickness to it. Having thicker lines in the darker areas and thinner ones on the lighter ones will do wonders to improve dynamic in your drawing. Also, don't be afraid to use textured brushes to do both your lineart and your shading, I started experimenting with it recently and I'm loving it.

From the shading it looks like you're using another layer with some sort of blending mode, and although this is fine, depending on the colors bellow can look wonky. I've recently started doing the shading and lighting in the same layer manually picking the colors, it's a bit more tricky and takes some work, but to me it looks much more natural. Also, something I don't usually take in consideration, your character isn't existing in a vacuum. You have a greenish background, but blue-ish shading, and those don't mesh well. Another nice trick is that, even though the light is coming from the left, the right side shouldn't be completely dark. There's a bit of light that shines through the back of the character, so the right side shouldn't be so dark. What should be darker, however, is zones like the armpit, bellow the neck and other crevices, adding another darker layer of shading can help your drawing look more three dimensional. For the lighting, I like to use a "screen" blending mode for the brush, it allows the creation of some pretty nice highlights.

I also think the shading blending is too loose, there should be a harder contrast between some light and dark zones. I'm recording the latest small project I'm working on, I can post a video of it to show how I currently do my shading :3

Finally, don't hate yourself, you should always strive to do better, but if you learn anything at all from a drawing then I would consider it a huge success.


I do normally work on a larger canvas then crop it, dont recall how big that one I worked was, and I dont know how big is big enough but I think I stay within 3000 x 3000 range.

I read about "weighted lines" as far as shade goes and I attempted it this round. Not sure about texture brushes on lines but I'll get there.

For shading, I kept it really simple since I dont know how to do it well, there's no special layer mode just a darker color on low opacity. I chose dark blue because Im trying to stay away from darker hues of the main color, didnt really consider the bg an actual background mainly just a substitute of white blank space, from what I recall colors of the background (if there were one) usually reflect on the shading of the object, which I figured I could throw on variant colors instead of just darker brown, like blue or green or whatever the background wouldve been.
As for shading placement, still working on that as Im not 100% sure. I have tried different gradations of shade but not very often, so that's a good one to keep in mind.

Wasnt aware of the blended shade being loose, will keep that in mind (and might as well PM me the vid sometime since Im on the subject and still figuring things out, hehe!)


And yeah, the initial post was ranty I mean better than that, thanks for the tips! :)
 
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