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Horror Games

S

Scales42

Guest
They did such a good job with the alien ai in that game :)

It was incredible, the best part for me was the fact, that it completely changes the behavior in the last act of the game (or atleast thats what I thought) making it even more unpredictable.
 

LadyNovaKane

New Member
It was incredible, the best part for me was the fact, that it completely changes the behavior in the last act of the game (or atleast thats what I thought) making it even more unpredictable.

My understanding of the alien AI is that it started learning how you played from the beginning it would stalk you down corridors based off your similar patterns of going through corridors previously that's why half way through the game it seems like the alien always knows where you are because he probably did
 

bombylius

Bearly present
It was incredible, the best part for me was the fact, that it completely changes the behavior in the last act of the game (or atleast thats what I thought) making it even more unpredictable.

I really like the way they approached the xenomorph - it always felt like an actual threat and not like some mindless enemy you can gun down in droves. As a big fan of the original Alien film I really apreciated this.
 
S

Scales42

Guest
I really like the way they approached the xenomorph - it always felt like an actual threat and not like some mindless enemy you can gun down in droves. As a big fan of the original Alien film I really apreciated this.

Agreed. I was one of the poor idiots who preorderd Aliens: Colonial Marines, so I got even more excited than most people when Isolation was coming out :D I also prefer the original film, but I have to say that Aliens has a lot of potential for a game too. but after the failure that was colonial marines iam afraid we'll never get one :(
 

LadyNovaKane

New Member
Agreed. I was one of the poor idiots who preorderd Aliens: Colonial Marines, so I got even more excited than most people when Isolation was coming out :D I also prefer the original film, but I have to say that Aliens has a lot of potential for a game too. but after the failure that was colonial marines iam afraid we'll never get one :(

But I mean isolation was made, and made well so I mean there is always still hope :3
 
People usually rave about Amnesia Dark descent, but Fractional Games made another very similar game in a more modern setting called "Penumbra Black Plague" which a lot of people probably know about already..

Not the first Penumbra if I understood correctly but easily the best in my eyes. What helps me with this is that the setup for the actual story just makes a bit more sense and "feels" a bit more realistic, but also that the setting is more modern and believable/relatable. Not to mention, one of the so called plot twists never quite made me so upset in a game before like Black plague managed to.
 

LadyNovaKane

New Member
People usually rave about Amnesia Dark descent, but Fractional Games made another very similar game in a more modern setting called "Penumbra Black Plague" which a lot of people probably know about already..

Not the first Penumbra if I understood correctly but easily the best in my eyes. What helps me with this is that the setup for the actual story just makes a bit more sense and "feels" a bit more realistic, but also that the setting is more modern and believable/relatable. Not to mention, one of the so called plot twists never quite made me so upset in a game before like Black plague managed to.

I have never played. I'll have to look into it
 

Zamietka

Well-Known Member
People usually rave about Amnesia Dark descent, but Fractional Games made another very similar game in a more modern setting called "Penumbra Black Plague" which a lot of people probably know about already..

Not the first Penumbra if I understood correctly but easily the best in my eyes. What helps me with this is that the setup for the actual story just makes a bit more sense and "feels" a bit more realistic, but also that the setting is more modern and believable/relatable. Not to mention, one of the so called plot twists never quite made me so upset in a game before like Black plague managed to.
The true appeal of Amnesia was probably the amount of custom stories made for it, often better than the actual game, hence the popularity.
I used to like horror games a lot, now I think I value more games that aren't necessarily meant to be horror, yet have a scary vibe to it, like Off, Limbo, or Little Nightmares. I have a feeling that too many horror games use the tactic of jumpscares + monster following you around, and the lack of originality is slowly killing the genre :v
 

Firuthi Dragovic

Gamer Dragon, former speedrunner
I have a feeling that too many horror games use the tactic of jumpscares + monster following you around, and the lack of originality is slowly killing the genre :v

I have to agree with this. Jumpscares as a horror mechanism don't do much for me - I might startle a bit and maybe yank off the headphones, but it's honestly scarier if someone randomly tries to get my attention mid-game simply because my attention is not on them.


Unfortunately for me, I'm one of those people that had nightmares after playing the original Doom - and I was 8 at the time. As a result of this among other things, most horror games nowadays simply do not have a strong effect on me. I remember trying to play Amnesia: Dark Descent with the lights off as they recommended and... simply not feeling any tension at all. And when someone dared me to play Slender: The Arrival (the one that made it to Steam) when I called out the lack of scariness (this was with a college group), the only remote tension I had was rushing for the last two pages in the first part and that's only because he was following a bit too close. No real fear at all.

Seems like my response to scary things in a game is an angry tension rather than actually being scared. For this reason and the fact that I'm bad at sneaking around, I will admit I don't have a lot of interest in the "completely defenseless" type of horror game. I'm not expecting to take on creatures in droves in a horror game, but just to be able to throw something in the face of a single threat and use the distraction to run.

With all that combined, about the closest thing I've played to a horror game in the past couple years was The Evil Within (the first one that is), and given my biggest recollection of the game is severe frustration at one particular corridor... I have a feeling I didn't actually get scared from that game.
 

Blythulu

Member
I remember watching a playthrough of the first Siren game and falling for it immediately, but never being able to find my own copy. I'm older now but I still haven't gone out of my way to track it down, let alone the second one.

Personally my favorite horror video game ever is Silent Hill 3, even though I doubt I'd be able to play through it now without a list of critiques (that would mostly fall under 'controls', lol). I loved the main character and story, and how it expanded on the lore of 1 so beautifully. The scene where the two connect is still one of my favorites in all video games. More recently, I got a lot of mileage out of RE7, and I can't wait to see where that franchise goes from here now that Silent Hills is dead and buried. It does have jump-scares, but honestly I like horror games that use them well (build up tension first, utilize them sparingly, have other things to be afraid of) so that doesn't bother me.
 

PolarizedBear

Whitest guy you know.
You just posted one of my favourite games of all time.
You beautiful bastard
 

PolarizedBear

Whitest guy you know.
I have to agree with this. Jumpscares as a horror mechanism don't do much for me - I might startle a bit and maybe yank off the headphones, but it's honestly scarier if someone randomly tries to get my attention mid-game simply because my attention is not on them.


Unfortunately for me, I'm one of those people that had nightmares after playing the original Doom - and I was 8 at the time. As a result of this among other things, most horror games nowadays simply do not have a strong effect on me. I remember trying to play Amnesia: Dark Descent with the lights off as they recommended and... simply not feeling any tension at all. And when someone dared me to play Slender: The Arrival (the one that made it to Steam) when I called out the lack of scariness (this was with a college group), the only remote tension I had was rushing for the last two pages in the first part and that's only because he was following a bit too close. No real fear at all.

Seems like my response to scary things in a game is an angry tension rather than actually being scared. For this reason and the fact that I'm bad at sneaking around, I will admit I don't have a lot of interest in the "completely defenseless" type of horror game. I'm not expecting to take on creatures in droves in a horror game, but just to be able to throw something in the face of a single threat and use the distraction to run.

With all that combined, about the closest thing I've played to a horror game in the past couple years was The Evil Within (the first one that is), and given my biggest recollection of the game is severe frustration at one particular corridor... I have a feeling I didn't actually get scared from that game.
You sound like you would enjoy "Survival Horror" outside of raw horror titles. Games like Resident Evil Remake, Silent Hill2, Dead Space. Purely because you have the option of fighting back and the tension/horror comes from your own proper management for every situation you come across and how you handle your own pacing. Tension can build through the roof when theres only two handgun rounds in your chamber and the lightning outside reveals a standing shadow down the hall. Resident Evil Remake is the master of this type of gameplay.

I remember watching a playthrough of the first Siren game and falling for it immediately, but never being able to find my own copy. I'm older now but I still haven't gone out of my way to track it down, let alone the second one.

Personally my favorite horror video game ever is Silent Hill 3, even though I doubt I'd be able to play through it now without a list of critiques (that would mostly fall under 'controls', lol). I loved the main character and story, and how it expanded on the lore of 1 so beautifully. The scene where the two connect is still one of my favorites in all video games. More recently, I got a lot of mileage out of RE7, and I can't wait to see where that franchise goes from here now that Silent Hills is dead and buried. It does have jump-scares, but honestly I like horror games that use them well (build up tension first, utilize them sparingly, have other things to be afraid of) so that doesn't bother me.


Jumpscares can be very useful for the genre if they are properly utilized, probably the more famous ones would be Silent Hill 3's "Johnny" (is his name I believe) or Resident Evil Remakes dog window scene or maybe even Eternal Darkness Sanity's Requim's trauma insanity events. Too many games utilize them poorly so the idea of them has cheapened unfortunately.
 

Blythulu

Member
Jumpscares can be very useful for the genre if they are properly utilized, probably the more famous ones would be Silent Hill 3's "Johnny" (is his name I believe) or Resident Evil Remakes dog window scene or maybe even Eternal Darkness Sanity's Requim's trauma insanity events. Too many games utilize them poorly so the idea of them has cheapened unfortunately.
Completely agree. Not to get the hate-train rolling, but a game like FNaF does very little for me. I like what the fans have made of it, but the game itself isn't interesting or fun in my perspective because the jump scares are the game. Match that against RE7, where the jump scares are used to not only make you scream but also to establish rules, and it just pales in comparison.

In my point of view, whether a jump scare succeeds or fails depends on whether it actually leaves an impression on the person playing. So it does vary from person to person somewhat. Games that are 90% jump scare tend not to leave an impression because the player becomes desensitized quickly. They might always remember how scared they were the first and second time, but all the others become white noise. RE7 has some of the most memorable jump scares I've ever seen.
 

PolarizedBear

Whitest guy you know.
Completely agree. Not to get the hate-train rolling, but a game like FNaF does very little for me. I like what the fans have made of it, but the game itself isn't interesting or fun in my perspective because the jump scares are the game. Match that against RE7, where the jump scares are used to not only make you scream but also to establish rules, and it just pales in comparison.

In my point of view, whether a jump scare succeeds or fails depends on whether it actually leaves an impression on the person playing. So it does vary from person to person somewhat. Games that are 90% jump scare tend not to leave an impression because the player becomes desensitized quickly. They might always remember how scared they were the first and second time, but all the others become white noise. RE7 has some of the most memorable jump scares I've ever seen.
Oh no I completely agree, I always thought FNaF was a cute little 5$ experience that felt more like a rhythm/awareness game with the punishments being jump scares was alright. I dont really like any of the sequels, from the 2nd and 3rd games I've played, although apparently the 5th one is completely different?

Resident Evil 7 utilizes them perfectly like with the tension with sneaking around Jack (of which the jumpscare punishment is only if you've alerted him and hes close enough nearby) when he smashes through the wall from the kitchen. Jumpscares should be a punishment to the player for becoming too relaxed, being too risky in situations, or with proper build up. Not just out of no where "BOO" like the Juon wii game as an example.

Silent Hill 1 had a great one (if not a tad silly) where you're wandering through the school I believe and you hear something awful banging down the room. You've faced greychildren, straightjackets, and other horrible amalgamation monstrosities by this point. So getting close to the locker only for a cat to burst out and run away left me both scared and laughing at how I could get so startled by something so silly and innocent.
 
You just posted one of my favourite games of all time.
You beautiful bastard
Ib and It Moves were the only horror games to get some kind of response from me. I don't know. The vagueness that comes from low quality graphics just gets me. Also, Ib's theme speaks to a lot of childhood nightmares and things I was generally afraid of in media.
 
I have to agree with this. Jumpscares as a horror mechanism don't do much for me - I might startle a bit and maybe yank off the headphones, but it's honestly scarier if someone randomly tries to get my attention mid-game simply because my attention is not on them.


Unfortunately for me, I'm one of those people that had nightmares after playing the original Doom - and I was 8 at the time. As a result of this among other things, most horror games nowadays simply do not have a strong effect on me. I remember trying to play Amnesia: Dark Descent with the lights off as they recommended and... simply not feeling any tension at all. And when someone dared me to play Slender: The Arrival (the one that made it to Steam) when I called out the lack of scariness (this was with a college group), the only remote tension I had was rushing for the last two pages in the first part and that's only because he was following a bit too close. No real fear at all.

Seems like my response to scary things in a game is an angry tension rather than actually being scared. For this reason and the fact that I'm bad at sneaking around, I will admit I don't have a lot of interest in the "completely defenseless" type of horror game. I'm not expecting to take on creatures in droves in a horror game, but just to be able to throw something in the face of a single threat and use the distraction to run.

With all that combined, about the closest thing I've played to a horror game in the past couple years was The Evil Within (the first one that is), and given my biggest recollection of the game is severe frustration at one particular corridor... I have a feeling I didn't actually get scared from that game.

I totally see where you are coming from and something like amnesia is not for everyone, but it could be worth mentioning(as I feel a lot of people get the wrong idea of a horror game, especially a good one not relying on jump scares). It's all about trying to embrace the game and live into it, not necessarily feeling scared to your bones or the feel like scary games do not get to you. Granted some games try harder than others to reach to you as a player but I myself can also relate to some of the things you say in your post.

The moment you lose all sense of living into the characters and being them, games instantly become less fun, even more so if they are heavily single player and story based. You maybe didn't ask for my suggestion directly but try to play pretend that you are in the game even if you know what is what just to let loose a bit. The whole idea of turning out your lights when playing amnesia is not necessarily to make the game more scary, it's to help with the immersion.

I myself noticed I started to have a harder time enjoying games as a whole after pretty much having a cold spell of decent story driven and/or single player games, just playing competitive multiplayer games of various sorts for years. Changes how you think and see games in general when they are not in the very group of games.
 

Firuthi Dragovic

Gamer Dragon, former speedrunner
So after the PC upgrade, I tried loading up Outlast to see if my disdain for jumpscares and "completely defenseless" games holds up... with headphones on and lights off to try and focus on it... so far it appears to. I'm finding myself more and more curious (and the camcorder only exacerbates this) rather than wanting to rush out... though I have to concede that the fact the protagonist curses a fair bit in his note-taking is actually a plus to me.

I totally see where you are coming from and something like amnesia is not for everyone, but it could be worth mentioning(as I feel a lot of people get the wrong idea of a horror game, especially a good one not relying on jump scares). It's all about trying to embrace the game and live into it, not necessarily feeling scared to your bones or the feel like scary games do not get to you. Granted some games try harder than others to reach to you as a player but I myself can also relate to some of the things you say in your post.

The moment you lose all sense of living into the characters and being them, games instantly become less fun, even more so if they are heavily single player and story based. You maybe didn't ask for my suggestion directly but try to play pretend that you are in the game even if you know what is what just to let loose a bit. The whole idea of turning out your lights when playing amnesia is not necessarily to make the game more scary, it's to help with the immersion.

I myself noticed I started to have a harder time enjoying games as a whole after pretty much having a cold spell of decent story driven and/or single player games, just playing competitive multiplayer games of various sorts for years. Changes how you think and see games in general when they are not in the very group of games.

Unfortunately, despite having a whole week to catch this, I somehow didn't see this one aimed at me until after I'd already been 2 hours into Outlast. I already am at the stage where I've lost a proper connection to the protagonist, reverting to an explorer's instinct that I know the protagonist has largely discarded at this stage.

I'm looking into playing either Alien: Isolation or Clive Barker's Undying after I'm done with Outlast and its DLC. I'll try your advice then and see if I can pull it off with either.
 
So after the PC upgrade, I tried loading up Outlast to see if my disdain for jumpscares and "completely defenseless" games holds up... with headphones on and lights off to try and focus on it... so far it appears to. I'm finding myself more and more curious (and the camcorder only exacerbates this) rather than wanting to rush out... though I have to concede that the fact the protagonist curses a fair bit in his note-taking is actually a plus to me.



Unfortunately, despite having a whole week to catch this, I somehow didn't see this one aimed at me until after I'd already been 2 hours into Outlast. I already am at the stage where I've lost a proper connection to the protagonist, reverting to an explorer's instinct that I know the protagonist has largely discarded at this stage.

I'm looking into playing either Alien: Isolation or Clive Barker's Undying after I'm done with Outlast and its DLC. I'll try your advice then and see if I can pull it off with either.
Best of luck to you.
 

Firuthi Dragovic

Gamer Dragon, former speedrunner
So, decided to can Outlast entirely given how little that game was doing for me (that and a part where I feel I simply don't have the chance to look for what I need to progress), and switched to Clive Barker's Undying. And attempting to put myself in the protagonist's place mentally.

I... don't honestly know if said immersion technique is actually working yet or if it's just the nature of the game, but Undying is doing an exponentially better job at being a horror game in my mind. I do have to say, though... if the immersion actually is working, I could only sustain it for an hour that time before I started suffering mental and possibly even slight physical fatigue (yes, really - lingering muscle tension will do that). I had to stop for the time being or risk losing the immersion.

Any other tips for this immersion thing?
 
So, decided to can Outlast entirely given how little that game was doing for me (that and a part where I feel I simply don't have the chance to look for what I need to progress), and switched to Clive Barker's Undying. And attempting to put myself in the protagonist's place mentally.

I... don't honestly know if said immersion technique is actually working yet or if it's just the nature of the game, but Undying is doing an exponentially better job at being a horror game in my mind. I do have to say, though... if the immersion actually is working, I could only sustain it for an hour that time before I started suffering mental and possibly even slight physical fatigue (yes, really - lingering muscle tension will do that). I had to stop for the time being or risk losing the immersion.

Any other tips for this immersion thing?

Possibly.

One beer or a glass of wine if that's your thing. Always turn off steam friends and discord/skype if you didn't already. Be done for the day with any potential chores or at the very least push it aside as it will still be on your mind.

Anything that gets between you and the game is a bad thing. Everything that makes you focus more on the game = good thing.

I have outlast in my library but never got to play it myself as I wanted to save it for a stream night, been 2 years at least and still nothing to come of it. Funny thing is however that I used to have clive barker's undying and got it as a gift after being home sick for a month @ age of 9 or something. Scared the shit out of me when I tried to play it the first time.
 
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