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How am I doing as a Let's Player?

Zehlua

Magepunk Fashionisto
I'm new to this, and I really need more practice and feedback. Here's my most recent Let's Play:


I'm worried that I talk too much, or I'm boring, or perhaps I'm not using my mic in the best way (Blue Yeti)
 

inkbloom

plant mom and mom friend
I love that you're playing something like Candyland. It's not often you see gaming videos for something like that. It immediately makes you stand out from the crowd.

Right off the bat, there's some background noise. It sounds like you're moving around a lot and it's causing little bumps and scrapes along your desk that the mic is picking up.

I get the impression that you're commenting as you play, which is fine, but my favorite let's players usually record the gameplay and then record a separate commentary track to play over it. That way you can stitch together multiple takes for better content, and rerecord audio that you flubbed or didn't record well. It is a little more work, but can add a nice professional touch. Of course, it doesn't work as well if you just want to give your off the cuff impressions.
 

Zehlua

Magepunk Fashionisto
I love that you're playing something like Candyland. It's not often you see gaming videos for something like that. It immediately makes you stand out from the crowd.

Right off the bat, there's some background noise. It sounds like you're moving around a lot and it's causing little bumps and scrapes along your desk that the mic is picking up.

I get the impression that you're commenting as you play, which is fine, but my favorite let's players usually record the gameplay and then record a separate commentary track to play over it. That way you can stitch together multiple takes for better content, and rerecord audio that you flubbed or didn't record well. It is a little more work, but can add a nice professional touch. Of course, it doesn't work as well if you just want to give your off the cuff impressions.
That's excellent constructive feedback! Thank you!
 

Zehlua

Magepunk Fashionisto

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I don't really feel like I have too much right to say anything in this since honestly I never made it quite far myself with my let's play content, and even though I refreshed and changed direction more towards long streams on my main channel a few years back, I still struggle. But, I gladly give feedback if it will assist you in any way since it's a fun hobby and you seem to have some potential.

I started my own let's play content back in 2013, mainly as a way to improve my commentary on the fly and become better at turning nothing into something. There are some people that will be more capable/having an easier time of making a decent let's play for sure, but I do think that a lot of people underestimate how hard it is to make this kind of content "good" and that's not only speaking of you as a person and the delivery of commentary, but also just general setup software wise, encoding settings and audio settings.

Sometimes I have a hard time listening to these kind of videos or peoples content because they don't have a solid delivery, or just come off as a bit awkward(to put it kindly), confidence and smooth delivery of your commentary does heaps. Just judging on your commentary alone here you're not completely in your wrong element and I can see you be able to make these kind of videos for sure if that's what you aimed for, right now I feel like you're being held back a bit though. Don't be afraid of talking too much, just talk to your hearts content and if it's something that just comes off too odd or weird to "you", edit that out later before posting the video. The commentary is what really makes the video yours, own it.

As Ink mentioned earlier in the thread, one thing is the audio and it's far from the best. Now audio isn't everything, but if it's your main source of making the content yours and communicating to the audience it has a lot of weight. Actually anything that you can improve on, you should take that opportunity to do so. Audio quality, video quality, they both go hand in hand. If you didn't mention that you had a blue yeti I'd honestly assume that you used the built in mic on your laptop and that's not a good thing. I know blue yeti isn't exactly at the peaks of good microphones for this, but it's certainly not the worst so I'd really tinker around with it if I were you and find more optimal settings and placement. Background noise is one thing, but it picking up on the laptop fan ramping up as you start the game, or just tapping on your laptop keyboard as loud thuds is not something you want in your videos. As an example, if I spot or hear myself accidentally bump my hanging mic(Sounds fairly similar to your typing) at a part nothing goes on, I edit that noise out because I don't want any viewer to need to hear it. OBS that most people use nowadays allow you to record several audio tracks, if you have one for your mic, and one track for the computer/game you will be able to edit a lot later.

Microphones are very easily affected by vibrations or noise near to them(They are microphones after all). It might be worth for you to invest in an arm that makes your mic hang down instead of standing on your desk(Just assuming it does atm). Try to place/prop up the mic further away from the source of noise like the laptop that gives off both keyboard thuds and fan noise, and instead closer to you(With the right audio settings). Also a thing like having a sturdy desk helps a lot if you move/shift your body around or hit the table as the noise will be transferred through the table, up to the mic. For a while I had issues with buzzing background noise entering all my voice recordings, and a few weeks later I realized it came from a hard drive inside of my PC that spun up, and the vibrations of that made it go through the PC case, into the table, up the mic and then into the recording.

There's quite a bit of hiss coming from your audio recording as well, and I will assume that it's from the mic recording itself and not the actual game recording. I'd like to believe this is due to it being plugged into directly to the laptop? Usually this kind of hiss you get from bad pre-amp/not very good soundcards as I doubt it's the mic that is that noisy by itself. You can in many cases plaster this a bit by applying a noise gate. You can edit that both afterwards in editing software, but also OBS has a noise gate built into it too. Noise gates are usually a good idea but from experience it can also be a bit of a hit and miss if your mic is not set up properly or you use it too aggressively and your commentary gets cut off or certain words pop in too late, but a light noise gate that removes the constant hissing is usually for the better.

To me at least, true let's plays are made with commentary that happens as you play it, if you as a content creator sit down and watch your own material and comment on the video afterwards I'd argue it becomes something different, let's watch more like it. However, nothing wrong with that as it's all about what "kind" of content you aim to make, but reactions and impressions will not be the same to a pre-recorded video for sure, pure let's plays are kinda there to capture that moment.

This is easier said than done in some cases and nothing personal, but try to avoid the "uhms" "uhhs" when making this kind of content. This is a personal preference for me but I enjoy hearing spoken words and sentences, someone who uses gap fillers like uhm a lot kinda comes off like they aren't in the moment and forcing out their commentary/inexperienced. You can intentionally say "Uhhhhm" to emphasis on something in your videos or a creative transition between sentences, but the intentional uhms sound and feel way different from the "I'm unsure what to say now" ones. Tip is really to get comfortable in your place doing commentary and not let them slip in too often.

Not everyone is willing to invest in expensive hardware, but if you enjoy this stuff it might be worth to get something nice like an external sound card for your mic, or a pc or laptop that encodes and stream video better. Also as a tip, if you have a possibility to use Nvidias nvenc encoding or Intels quick sync to encode your video, you should totally utilize it since the quality is great and system impact is very low. Also things you can set up in OBS if you have it.

Just keep going at it and have fun otherwise, gaming content is a fierce market.
 

Zehlua

Magepunk Fashionisto
I don't really feel like I have too much right to say anything in this since honestly I never made it quite far myself with my let's play content, and even though I refreshed and changed direction more towards long streams on my main channel a few years back, I still struggle. But, I gladly give feedback if it will assist you in any way since it's a fun hobby and you seem to have some potential.

I started my own let's play content back in 2013, mainly as a way to improve my commentary on the fly and become better at turning nothing into something. There are some people that will be more capable/having an easier time of making a decent let's play for sure, but I do think that a lot of people underestimate how hard it is to make this kind of content "good" and that's not only speaking of you as a person and the delivery of commentary, but also just general setup software wise, encoding settings and audio settings.

Sometimes I have a hard time listening to these kind of videos or peoples content because they don't have a solid delivery, or just come off as a bit awkward(to put it kindly), confidence and smooth delivery of your commentary does heaps. Just judging on your commentary alone here you're not completely in your wrong element and I can see you be able to make these kind of videos for sure if that's what you aimed for, right now I feel like you're being held back a bit though. Don't be afraid of talking too much, just talk to your hearts content and if it's something that just comes off too odd or weird to "you", edit that out later before posting the video. The commentary is what really makes the video yours, own it.

As Ink mentioned earlier in the thread, one thing is the audio and it's far from the best. Now audio isn't everything, but if it's your main source of making the content yours and communicating to the audience it has a lot of weight. Actually anything that you can improve on, you should take that opportunity to do so. Audio quality, video quality, they both go hand in hand. If you didn't mention that you had a blue yeti I'd honestly assume that you used the built in mic on your laptop and that's not a good thing. I know blue yeti isn't exactly at the peaks of good microphones for this, but it's certainly not the worst so I'd really tinker around with it if I were you and find more optimal settings and placement. Background noise is one thing, but it picking up on the laptop fan ramping up as you start the game, or just tapping on your laptop keyboard as loud thuds is not something you want in your videos. As an example, if I spot or hear myself accidentally bump my hanging mic(Sounds fairly similar to your typing) at a part nothing goes on, I edit that noise out because I don't want any viewer to need to hear it. OBS that most people use nowadays allow you to record several audio tracks, if you have one for your mic, and one track for the computer/game you will be able to edit a lot later.

Microphones are very easily affected by vibrations or noise near to them(They are microphones after all). It might be worth for you to invest in an arm that makes your mic hang down instead of standing on your desk(Just assuming it does atm). Try to place/prop up the mic further away from the source of noise like the laptop that gives off both keyboard thuds and fan noise, and instead closer to you(With the right audio settings). Also a thing like having a sturdy desk helps a lot if you move/shift your body around or hit the table as the noise will be transferred through the table, up to the mic. For a while I had issues with buzzing background noise entering all my voice recordings, and a few weeks later I realized it came from a hard drive inside of my PC that spun up, and the vibrations of that made it go through the PC case, into the table, up the mic and then into the recording.

There's quite a bit of hiss coming from your audio recording as well, and I will assume that it's from the mic recording itself and not the actual game recording. I'd like to believe this is due to it being plugged into directly to the laptop? Usually this kind of hiss you get from bad pre-amp/not very good soundcards as I doubt it's the mic that is that noisy by itself. You can in many cases plaster this a bit by applying a noise gate. You can edit that both afterwards in editing software, but also OBS has a noise gate built into it too. Noise gates are usually a good idea but from experience it can also be a bit of a hit and miss if your mic is not set up properly or you use it too aggressively and your commentary gets cut off or certain words pop in too late, but a light noise gate that removes the constant hissing is usually for the better.

To me at least, true let's plays are made with commentary that happens as you play it, if you as a content creator sit down and watch your own material and comment on the video afterwards I'd argue it becomes something different, let's watch more like it. However, nothing wrong with that as it's all about what "kind" of content you aim to make, but reactions and impressions will not be the same to a pre-recorded video for sure, pure let's plays are kinda there to capture that moment.

This is easier said than done in some cases and nothing personal, but try to avoid the "uhms" "uhhs" when making this kind of content. This is a personal preference for me but I enjoy hearing spoken words and sentences, someone who uses gap fillers like uhm a lot kinda comes off like they aren't in the moment and forcing out their commentary/inexperienced. You can intentionally say "Uhhhhm" to emphasis on something in your videos or a creative transition between sentences, but the intentional uhms sound and feel way different from the "I'm unsure what to say now" ones. Tip is really to get comfortable in your place doing commentary and not let them slip in too often.

Not everyone is willing to invest in expensive hardware, but if you enjoy this stuff it might be worth to get something nice like an external sound card for your mic, or a pc or laptop that encodes and stream video better. Also as a tip, if you have a possibility to use Nvidias nvenc encoding or Intels quick sync to encode your video, you should totally utilize it since the quality is great and system impact is very low. Also things you can set up in OBS if you have it.

Just keep going at it and have fun otherwise, gaming content is a fierce market.
Thank you so much for taking the time to type all that and explain! Do you have any tips for making my blue yeti microphone pick up less feedback, so it doesn't hiss?
 

inkbloom

plant mom and mom friend
To me at least, true let's plays are made with commentary that happens as you play it, if you as a content creator sit down and watch your own material and comment on the video afterwards I'd argue it becomes something different, let's watch more like it. However, nothing wrong with that as it's all about what "kind" of content you aim to make, but reactions and impressions will not be the same to a pre-recorded video for sure, pure let's plays are kinda there to capture that moment.
I guess to me, live commentary gets sorted into the same category as streams. For reference, when I think of Let's Plays, I think of Chip Cheezum and his videos. But you're right, it's completely true that pre-recorded won't pick up the fun reactions and first impressions. And Zehlua's pure joy when playing was quite endearing and enjoyable.



Now that I've had time to watch the whole thing, I appreciate that you took the time to go to each land and exhaust all the unique animations. It's nice to be able to see everything available in the game and get that kind of complete experience.
 

Zehlua

Magepunk Fashionisto
I guess to me, live commentary gets sorted into the same category as streams. For reference, when I think of Let's Plays, I think of Chip Cheezum and his videos. But you're right, it's completely true that pre-recorded won't pick up the fun reactions and first impressions. And Zehlua's pure joy when playing was quite endearing and enjoyable.



Now that I've had time to watch the whole thing, I appreciate that you took the time to go to each land and exhaust all the unique animations. It's nice to be able to see everything available in the game and get that kind of complete experience.
Thank you! Wow!
 
Thank you so much for taking the time to type all that and explain! Do you have any tips for making my blue yeti microphone pick up less feedback, so it doesn't hiss?
Plain and simple, apply a noise gate so the mic only activates when you speak, not all the time. There's a built in noise gate in OBS and OBS streamlabs. But if you don't do live streaming a better option might be to edit in a noise gate in Vegas/Premiere before rendering a video(If you have that). This is the very straight up solution since I do not quite know how you have your stuff set up.

Usually you don't want to use any lots of gain unless you have to and keep the mic closer to your mouth when you speak as long as you don't create excessive popping noises when using "p's". The hissing noise I believe usually comes from bringing up the audio signal in various ways and/or the soundcard not being up to par for the task and it's pre-amp is bad on said audio card. I did a quick google but I assume that your yeti plugs in via USB to your computer and I do not have much experience with those kind of microphones. But bring gain and audio boost down, bring mic closer to "you". Raise the gain as deemed fit to make your commentary audible.

It would be a start if you haven't, and of course keep the mic away from the noise source like laptop fan or keyboard.

Also as a side note, don't do the same mistake as me and buy a blue switch keyboard that you plan on having long term as it is bound to find it's way into your recordings no matter what you do, lel.
 
Last edited:

Zehlua

Magepunk Fashionisto
Plain and simple, apply a noise gate so the mic only activates when you speak, not all the time. There's a built in noise gate in OBS and OBS streamlabs. But if you don't do live streaming a better option might be to edit in a noise gate in Vegas/Premiere before rendering a video(If you have that). This is the very straight up solution since I do not quite know how you have your stuff set up.

Usually you don't want to use any lots of gain unless you have to and keep the mic closer to your mouth when you speak as long as you don't create excessive popping noises when using "p's". The hissing noise I believe usually comes from bringing up the audio signal in various ways and/or the soundcard not being up to par for the task and it's pre-amp is bad on said audio card. I did a quick google but I assume that your yeti plugs in via USB to your computer and I do not have much experience with those kind of microphones. But bring gain and audio boost down, bring mic closer to "you". Raise the gain as deemed fit to make your commentary audible.

It would be a start if you haven't, and of course keep the mic away from the noise source like laptop fan or keyboard.

Also as a side note, don't do the same mistake as me and buy a blue switch keyboard that you plan on having long term as it is bound to find it's way into your recordings no matter what you do, lel.
Thank you for all of that!
 
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