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How do people draw so well on computers?

Hi,
Im wondering how do people draw so well digitally? (On computers)
Yes , i realise that the have those drawing tablets and skill but , how!?
I draw every day (Tanks , duh :p) and when trying to draw that on my pc using one of those tablets , i fail horribly! I just dont understand....i cant even draw a simple animal! Is there anything i can do except traning how to draw?
 

Diretooth

Dire Wolf and Dragon Therianthrope
You make shapes until you can make consistently good enough shapes that you can turn those shapes into art. There are some artists who use a mouse and make really good art just by virtue of sheer tenacity and practice. Alternatively, you could spend a lot of money to get a drawing tablet. While this is not the 'quick and easy' method to making better digital art, it can lead to an overall 'easier' experience since you will have finer control over where the color goes.
Ultimately, it just comes down to practice.
 
You make shapes until you can make consistently good enough shapes that you can turn those shapes into art. There are some artists who use a mouse and make really good art just by virtue of sheer tenacity and practice. Alternatively, you could spend a lot of money to get a drawing tablet. While this is not the 'quick and easy' method to making better digital art, it can lead to an overall 'easier' experience since you will have finer control over where the color goes.
Ultimately, it just comes down to practice.
I got everything i need , from fast internet , to drawing tablet and software....i cant practice alot tho since im working on multiple projects
 
A

ACaracalFromWork

Guest
It helps finding the right paint program for you for starts
understand how the art program works and becoming familiar with it is important.

heres some great free art programs
Mediabang I myself enjoy using this program its very simple and powerful
krita: is a full fledged art program with tons of features but hard for a beginner to get into.
Gimp: is also a good program with lots of features but can be difficult and takes a lot of learning

Paint.net: one of the easiest art programs to understand has good tools but it's pretty basic
 
L

-..Legacy..-

Guest
What Dire said, plus the fact you can layer everything to better effect. You're still using the same strokes, but the ability to reverse or change in seconds does make for an easier time.

Understanding HSB properly also makes for better results. This is a great article regarding the science behind color.

design.tutsplus.com: Color Fundamentals: Shading
 
I might be a computer nerd but i cannot do anything that you guys said :p....I have Adobe Flash CS6 , paint.net , Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 and such and in all those programs i suck....Sigh
 
L

-..Legacy..-

Guest
I might be a computer nerd but i cannot do anything that you guys said :p....I have Adobe Flash CS6 , paint.net , Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 and such and in all those programs i suck....Sigh

They all have high learning curves, so don't get discouraged. The only way to figure those out, is to use them repeatedly. Draw a circle, color it, and just start playing with brushes and effects. You'll find a new technique, then apply it your normal regimen.

As you keep gaining new insight, your work will improve, as will your speed.
 
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redfox_81

Well-Known Member
It’s the same way you get better at any medium: time and practice. Working on a standard tablet is tough at first and you just have to be patient! I always found the disconnect between tablet and screen to be really jarring and could never deal with looking at the screen while my hand drew out of my field of vision. It was just too weird and inaccurate for me. Now I work on a Cintiq which is a godsend, but I know they’re crazy expensive.

Stick at it, you’ll get it. There’s a lot to be said for setting up Photoshop (or your drawing program of choice) so it works for you, and not against you. Struggling with the software is half the battle at first!
 

6L925

just a dude
Having a strong understanding of the fundamentals of art is key imo. Doesn't matter if you're drawing traditionally or digitally. The basics are the most important, it doesn't matter what medium you use. Of course practicing digitally will lead to better results on later digital projects, but knowing things like, anatomy, shading, and perspective are universal to any drawing medium. Practice, practice, practice is the key.
 

Taku

Can't hear you beneath the rumble of the bass
This took me forty hours on Macromedia fireworks and I can still see the things I don't like. The key is to keep going, start fresh on new projects, and try not to focus on the little faults. The artist is their own worst critic.
 

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L

-..Legacy..-

Guest
This took me forty hours on Macromedia fireworks and I can still see the things I don't like. The key is to keep going, start fresh on new projects, and try not to focus on the little faults. The artist is their own worst critic.

I remember MF. That was a fun program with interesting effects.
 

RailRide

The Real Wheels of Steel
I'm quite the novice to all-digital drawing, (still mostly pencil+paper+scanner) but I use a tablet for everything other than vector work.

In fact, I've been using tablets since Windows 3.1 was mainstream. What I think helped me over the hump of not looking at where I was actually drawing was to use the tablet as a general pointing device for regular computing tasks. I've never had a lot of desk space for my computers, and a tablet allowed me to access the limits of my screen without having to pick up and reposition a mouse to reach the extreme edges of the screen. Think about it this way, when you're using a mouse to do general computing stuff, do you have to stare at the mouse to point and click on icons and webpage links? Usually the answer to that is 'no'.

Incidentally, those who found salvation in the form of screen tablets had to clear another hump that is a stumbling block for some--the parallax effect where the tip of your stylus does not fall exactly where the pointer appears onscreen owing to the glass between your stylus tip and the actual LCD. I bought a Surface Pro 2 'round about the time the Surface Pro 3 came out, as a "cheap" way of experimenting with screen tablets (i.e. about half that of the cheapest Cintiq at the time) for all-digital drawing, and its parallax was something I'm still trying to come to terms with--I currently hold the stylus straight up-and-down in order to minimize it for the few times I have tried to draw with it without having a scanned pencil to work over.

---PCJ
 

DarkoKavinsky

ʎʇʇɐq ʇıq ɐ
Get a second hand cintiq. My current rig is a Wacom Studio Pro 13hd but even a regular cintiq will be leaps and bounds above a tablet. I got a cheapie tablet for 100 dollars with a surface pro like pen and whilst I can use it for sketching (literal point of it was to sketch on go) The wacom is infinitely better. Secondhand cintiqs can be found pretty affordable. If you're looking for a second hand cintiq I highly suggest you avoid the companion line. They are impressive machines but the stupid plug WILL fail. I have sitting one my desk right now that is just a paperweight. I ended up cracking it open and having to solder in a new plug. it works fine its just its scarier than hell soldering the internals of a 700 dollar machine. A good used cintiq will be about half that.

Theres no issues with parallax and sensitivity is great. If you're willing to throw down some cash and can swing for it I do recommend the wacom studio pro. Its a costly beast and many people argued with me its a tool I shouldn't have. However I'm going to be set for years, if not a decade. Its a tool you grow into.
 
If you're aiming to do a lot of digital work on your computer with a platform you can count on, definitely find yourself a tablet; as long as it's in decent shape and works with your OS well enough that you can consistently apply your practicing to it, used will do you fine. I bought my WACOM Intuous 9x12 in 2005, and I admit it was tough to learn how not to look at my hand but on my computer screen for years (quite literally).

Mouse-drawing is hit-or-miss, depending on whether you've got a surface for scrolling and a mouse your hand works well with. I'm not trying to put myself on any pedestals, as much as I'd like to show you two examples of mine.

This is a picture I drew with DeviantArt's Muro feature six or seven years back, with a mouse:


This is a picture I drew and coloured in IrfanView's built-in paint program on my computer, again with a mouse, a little over two years later:


I do not consider myself or my skills in any way exceptional on an absolute basis. I firmly believe that it starts with some talent, that I also believe almost everyone will have enough of, and a whole lot of regular practicing and observation and contact with the world around one's person. Alexander, take it from someone who continues to learn to this day: you can do the above and much more.

-2Paw.
 

Latur Husky

Buzzkill
For me it's pretty easy to draw on computer (despite the fact I'm not good at it overally), but that might be because I wasn't drawing on paper prior to giving digital drawing a try so i don't feel struggle with transition.
 
S

Sablesword

Guest
I'm the OP's opposite number: I wonder how people can manage to draw on physical paper.

I use CorelDraw and my drawings are all vector-based. It's how my mind works. The way I approach it, it's somewhat like sculpting, only in two dimensions instead of three. I create rough shapes, then form and trim them, and layer on additional shapes. I also pay close attention to proportions and perspective.

And yes: Practice.
 
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