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How do you Vector lines

Stratelier

Well-Known Member
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vector_graphics

"Vector" is a form of computer graphics that defines an image in terms of lines, curves, shapes and polygons (as opposed to "raster" in which images are defined by pixels).

Photoshop is a raster editor, so its vector functions are basically limited to the "Path" tool. The Path tool allows you to prepare linework without making any actual changes to the current layer, by defining a series of control points ("nodes") that dictate lines and curves. Creating and editing a path is easy to do because you can click and drag the path nodes until the overall path just "looks right". After that, you tell Photoshop to "Stroke Path" and it will automatically paint the current layer with the current brush, following exactly along the path, which produces very clean, jitter-free lines and curves.

You could also use a dedicated vector-graphics program, such as Adobe Illustrator (or the free Inkscape), but for what you want to do, it doesn't make much difference.
 

Sarn Darkholm

Amiibo Hunter
Stratadrake said:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vector_graphics

"Vector" is a form of computer graphics that defines an image in terms of lines, curves, shapes and polygons (as opposed to "raster" in which images are defined by pixels).

Photoshop is a raster editor, so its vector functions are basically limited to the "Path" tool. The Path tool allows you to prepare linework without making any actual changes to the current layer, by defining a series of control points ("nodes") that dictate lines and curves. Creating and editing a path is easy to do because you can click and drag the path nodes until the overall path just "looks right". After that, you tell Photoshop to "Stroke Path" and it will automatically paint the current layer with the current brush, following exactly along the path, which produces very clean, jitter-free lines and curves.

You could also use a dedicated vector-graphics program, such as Adobe Illustrator (or the free Inkscape), but for what you want to do, it doesn't make much difference.

will that work on something drawn on normal paper and then scanned in?
 

Stratelier

Well-Known Member
...you don't use layers much, do you?
Eh, yes it'll work for traditional drawings. What you do is create a new layer (transparent fill) above the scanned drawing, build your paths, and stroke them onto that. When all's said and done you can simply hide the original layer and all that remains is the clean path strokes.
 

Emil

Roll Fizzlebeef
Sarn Darkholm said:
Stratadrake said:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vector_graphics

"Vector" is a form of computer graphics that defines an image in terms of lines, curves, shapes and polygons (as opposed to "raster" in which images are defined by pixels).

Photoshop is a raster editor, so its vector functions are basically limited to the "Path" tool. The Path tool allows you to prepare linework without making any actual changes to the current layer, by defining a series of control points ("nodes") that dictate lines and curves. Creating and editing a path is easy to do because you can click and drag the path nodes until the overall path just "looks right". After that, you tell Photoshop to "Stroke Path" and it will automatically paint the current layer with the current brush, following exactly along the path, which produces very clean, jitter-free lines and curves.

You could also use a dedicated vector-graphics program, such as Adobe Illustrator (or the free Inkscape), but for what you want to do, it doesn't make much difference.

will that work on something drawn on normal paper and then scanned in?

Yes. Import the scanned jpeg into photoshop, then make a new layer. Go over your lines with the pen tool in the new layer.
 

Aden

Play from your ****ing HEART
Hokay, quick tutorial tiem! I'm in Photoshop CS2, which works the same way as older versions. I haven't worked with CS3 yet, but it's probably the same.

First, load up your image that you want to trace and make a new layer. Select the Pen Tool.
Picture-2.jpg


Your Pen Tool settings are important. Usually, you're going to stick with these:
Picture-1-1.jpg


The highlighted setting on the left simply means it's going to make a new path every time you make a new path. Convenient, eh? :p The highlighted setting on the right will probably solve the problem you were having before (the making a blob thing). This tells it not to auto-fill the path you're making.

So you have a line. I have provided a shiny, stunning example of one by way of the mouse:
Picture-3.jpg


Start drawing your path on the line. Most find the Pen Tool hard to work with at first, but I think it's a very good system. You'll figure it out, believe me.
Picture-4.jpg


So you've made your starting point, and then you click somewhere else to make a line. If you click+drag somewhere else, it will give you the handles shown above that will control the curvature. Finish up your path and press Enter.
Picture-5.jpg


Now notice that when you clicked with the Pen Tool the first time, it made a new Work Path, as shown in the Paths box, which is by your Layers box:
Picture-4_2.jpg


Click the path you want to work with to make it show up. You can create new paths from this area. This way, you can save all of the paths you've made if you ever want to do something with them later (instead of deleting them when you're done with them).

Putting your path to use is as easy as right-clicking on the canvas (or going to your Edit menu or the context menu of the Paths box) while in the Pen Tool:
Picture-6.jpg


Selecting "Stroke Path..." will bring up a list of options that will make it as if you took a brush and dragged it along the path, giving you your smooth line. "Fill Path..." is pretty self-explanatory if you need it.
 

Sarn Darkholm

Amiibo Hunter
Aden said:
Hokay, quick tutorial tiem! I'm in Photoshop CS2, which works the same way as older versions. I haven't worked with CS3 yet, but it's probably the same.

First, load up your image that you want to trace and make a new layer. Select the Pen Tool.
Picture-2.jpg


Your Pen Tool settings are important. Usually, you're going to stick with these:
Picture-1-1.jpg


The highlighted setting on the left simply means it's going to make a new path every time you make a new path. Convenient, eh? :p The highlighted setting on the right will probably solve the problem you were having before (the making a blob thing). This tells it not to auto-fill the path you're making.

So you have a line. I have provided a shiny, stunning example of one by way of the mouse:
Picture-3.jpg


Start drawing your path on the line. Most find the Pen Tool hard to work with at first, but I think it's a very good system. You'll figure it out, believe me.
Picture-4.jpg


So you've made your starting point, and then you click somewhere else to make a line. If you click+drag somewhere else, it will give you the handles shown above that will control the curvature. Finish up your path and press Enter.
Picture-5.jpg


Now notice that when you clicked with the Pen Tool the first time, it made a new Work Path, as shown in the Paths box, which is by your Layers box:
Picture-4_2.jpg


Click the path you want to work with to make it show up. You can create new paths from this area. This way, you can save all of the paths you've made if you ever want to do something with them later (instead of deleting them when you're done with them).

Putting your path to use is as easy as right-clicking on the canvas (or going to your Edit menu or the context menu of the Paths box) while in the Pen Tool:
Picture-6.jpg


Selecting "Stroke Path..." will bring up a list of options that will make it as if you took a brush and dragged it along the path, giving you your smooth line. "Fill Path..." is pretty self-explanatory if you need it.


Wow this really helps. Thanks Aden.
 

Stratelier

Well-Known Member
Wow this really helps. Thanks Aden.
Gotta love those types of posts where you quote an epic novel just to add a haiku at the end.

PS: But seriously, folks. If you wanted to use an actual vector editor (Illustrator, Inkscape, etc.) for your lineart, the steps are basically the same as in Photoshop, except that instead of telling it to "Stroke path" at the end, you export a copy of it to disk and then open that in Photoshop for coloring.
 

Infinity

Member
Did somebody say Inkscape?

http://mythtrainerinfinity.deviantart.com/art/Inkscape-Tutorial-v-0-44-49024815
http://mythtrainerinfinity.deviantart.com/art/MTI-s-Ver-0-45-Inkscape-Tut-76940107

Inkscape will smooth out the lines, if you can outline fairly well traditionally you will be able to bypass most of messing with paths and such. Besides it might just be a personal preference, but outline via only paths doesn't leave much personality in the line art if you know what I mean.
 

BijouxDeFoxxe

shake wut ur mama gave u
an easier way to trace all your lines with paths in Photoshop is to take the magic wand, select all the white areas go select>inverse and then you to you Paths window and select "make new working path" a little screen pops up with a number. 3 is sually a good one to use. The higher the number, the more points will be on the final path. Click ok and the paths show up. You can fill this in by selecting the fill path (circle filled in on the bottom of the Path menu box) button. It may look jagged on screen, but it will print smooth.

Or you can be like me and ink everything via Illustrator and save it as a photoshop document and color it in photoshop
 

Stratelier

Well-Known Member
Illustrator is a full-blooded vector editor, of course. (Just like Inkscape, really, but I don't recall if GIMP can import SVG documents....)
 

Stratelier

Well-Known Member
No surprise. Even if it did, all your raster data would wind up exported to discrete PNG files, only paths (and possibly text) would actually be contained in the SVG layers.
 
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