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sausy1

i'm fine
I would like to start writing TF stories, and I have an outline ready for one. It's a story where the transformation lasts several days and comes in stages.
The stages are very slow and patient, but I can't seem to adequately describe it without it feeling rushed, bloated, or repetitive.
So, how can I describe a slow and patient transformation without it being boring or awkward?
 

ben909

vaporeon
I have thought about this ... too much...

How does the tf progress if its not continuous?

(I might need to wait to wakenup
More)
 

Trevorbluesquirrel

Well-Known Member
I would say every time you describe a part of the change, write what the character thinks or feels about it, and what he might be worried or concerned about in regards 2 it!

Then describe what else they expect to come, how it compares to previous changes, and what their past was like, or what they expect in the future!

Finally, describe what they're doing, where they're going, who else is around, the scene, the weather, noise, sights, anything that adds to the location and mood!

Then the next change, and so on...............................

Basically, fill the time between changes with info about the character and surroundings! Don't have to include all of it, but just enough to help describe what else happens over the course of the day, besides the changes!
 

sausy1

i'm fine
I have thought about this ... too much...

How does the tf progress if its not continuous?

(I might need to wait to wakenup
More)
The basic concept is that this guy (Oliver) is commissioned to investigate a statuette of a snake.
When he stares into the figure's eyes, the transformation continues, and when he stops staring, the transformation stops.
He has to put in about half an hour a day or else he'll go insane because magic.
 

ben909

vaporeon
The basic concept is that this guy (Oliver) is commissioned to investigate a statuette of a snake.
When he stares into the figure's eyes, the transformation continues, and when he stops staring, the transformation stops.
He has to put in about half an hour a day or else he'll go insane because magic.
Ok, i will need to wait because i lose track of ideas on my phone
 

sausy1

i'm fine
I would say every time you describe a part of the change, write what the character thinks or feels about it, and what he might be worried or concerned about in regards 2 it!

Then describe what else they expect to come, how it compares to previous changes, and what their past was like, or what they expect in the future!

Finally, describe what they're doing, where they're going, who else is around, the scene, the weather, noise, sights, anything that adds to the location and mood!

Then the next change, and so on...............................

Basically, fill the time between changes with info about the character and surroundings! Don't have to include all of it, but just enough to help describe what else happens over the course of the day, besides the changes!
That's something I wanted to do.
I've always been interested in TF stories that have more depth than "ooo he grows a tail".
I found that making the story a sort of slice-of-life story and having the transformation be non-continuous was a great way to do this.
 

Kate Marquet

Writing something, usually
I have a few tips I based on my experience with longer (15k words and over sort) stories.

-Do a fair amount of setup before the transformation first, fleshing out the setting and "rules" of the transformation. But primarily set up your character(s) and who they are. This gives you that solid starting point from which to work with to warp later.

-Since you're saying this is happening in bursts, I'd say go for a lot of reactions to the changes and like the shock of dealing with them. With a snake, the loss of hands and legs and such would certainly be things to focus on but things like hair loss, skin changing, and gradual mental decay can creep in too.

-Having other things happening as the changes do can also give the character, and therefore you the writer, more to work with. It's the difference between changing in a room by themselves or changing while racing home from work. The latter provides lots of opportunities for those changes to intermingle with life which is more you can write about. The actual amount of time you want to pass from the start to the end determines the pace of that backdrop.

-I wouldn't say it's so much about adding detail to the transformation or scene as it is just giving reader a better sense of things. So if I'm talking about someone's hand turning into a paw, for a longer story I'm not just describing each muscle or sinew's movements during the change, but probably lean more on how the person is reacting to the changes and how they're interacting with their environment.

-Depends on the story you're writing, but dialogue is always a great way to add to a scene if you want to give it something extra. Also is always a good narrative boost and keeps your story well paced. Heck, if the character is having mental issues, evening talking to themselves work.

-Speaking of pace, I would say that's the most important thing to keep in mind. Don't gone long just for the sake of it or feel that every snapshot of the change needs a vivid description. Your story has a sort of tickling clock but it's entirely in the character's hands so that's certainly a fun aspect to play with.

-And the last thing that's coming to mind for me is planning out the order of changes in a way that gives you ways to facilitate most of what I referenced. You're the storyteller so you can change any aspect you need to make the story better.


Hope that helps a little. ^^
 

sausy1

i'm fine
I have a few tips I based on my experience with longer (15k words and over sort) stories.

-Do a fair amount of setup before the transformation first, fleshing out the setting and "rules" of the transformation. But primarily set up your character(s) and who they are. This gives you that solid starting point from which to work with to warp later.

-Since you're saying this is happening in bursts, I'd say go for a lot of reactions to the changes and like the shock of dealing with them. With a snake, the loss of hands and legs and such would certainly be things to focus on but things like hair loss, skin changing, and gradual mental decay can creep in too.

-Having other things happening as the changes do can also give the character, and therefore you the writer, more to work with. It's the difference between changing in a room by themselves or changing while racing home from work. The latter provides lots of opportunities for those changes to intermingle with life which is more you can write about. The actual amount of time you want to pass from the start to the end determines the pace of that backdrop.

-I wouldn't say it's so much about adding detail to the transformation or scene as it is just giving reader a better sense of things. So if I'm talking about someone's hand turning into a paw, for a longer story I'm not just describing each muscle or sinew's movements during the change, but probably lean more on how the person is reacting to the changes and how they're interacting with their environment.

-Depends on the story you're writing, but dialogue is always a great way to add to a scene if you want to give it something extra. Also is always a good narrative boost and keeps your story well paced. Heck, if the character is having mental issues, evening talking to themselves work.

-Speaking of pace, I would say that's the most important thing to keep in mind. Don't gone long just for the sake of it or feel that every snapshot of the change needs a vivid description. Your story has a sort of tickling clock but it's entirely in the character's hands so that's certainly a fun aspect to play with.

-And the last thing that's coming to mind for me is planning out the order of changes in a way that gives you ways to facilitate most of what I referenced. You're the storyteller so you can change any aspect you need to make the story better.


Hope that helps a little. ^^
That helps, thanks a lot!
 
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