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Humans or no humans in an anthro setting?

Humans or no humans?

  • Humans

    Votes: 27 52.9%
  • No humans

    Votes: 24 47.1%

  • Total voters
    51

MaelstromEyre

Slippery When Wet
The world my character lives in, there are humans and they have caused her a lot of issues in the past. For the most part, she is just cold to them, she does not trust them. It makes it fun in RP, when a human character doesn't understand why she doesn't seem to like them.
 

Simo

Professional Watermelon Farmer
So far, I've never used humans in an anthro setting, in fiction or in RP. I'm not one to say it shouldn't be done, but I don't think I can see wanting to do it.

(oddly, the idea of mixing the two has never really entered my mind)
 

ryuukei8569

The Adorable Kurokuri
depends on the setting and the Scope. Realistically it is a bit more difficult to include humans in settings that are confined to a single planet, unless the number of anthro species is limited to only a few as well. Sci Fi settings are of course far less limited in this regard.

But it also depends on the type of anthro's used. if it is a Zootopia type setting where numerous feral animals have been replaced with anthro versions, working humans into the setting can cause problems. But if the anthro's are separate from their feral counterparts i see no problems here.

Personally I use two methods for integrating anthro's in my own Sci Fui settign Infinite Cosmos. The first method is that there are various species of anthro's that where seeded on numerous other planets by a long dead alien civilization. Currently this is where my development efforts are focused. The second way Anthro's exist in my setting is perhaps a little more, literal method. It is a very high technology far future setting, which includes lots of high end biological augmentations and cybernetics. So it is quite possible for a normal Human to alter the appearance of their own body to actually look like an Anthro through a wide variety of methods, even though genetically they are still Human. Sentient Androids are also present in the setting and some may choose to assume an Anthro appearance as well.
 
I say include Humans if there's a need to demonstrate the distinctiveness of anthros. A lot of 'humans are dull' impressions come from the fact that all the anthro characters are just humans who happen to look like animals, therefore making the inclusion of humans totally superfluous and unnecessary. On the flipside, a story where the entire cast is anthros can still come off as silly if none of those anthros' species matter, since you could just tell that story with all humans and achieve the same effect.

Contrast Zootopia and Beastars, where the social dialogue around species is central to the story, characters, and themes, to a movie like Sing, where the choice of species is just made on what will sell more toys and is completely unnecessary to the plot. Zootopia and Beastars are much more memorable to broad audiences, even though none of the three IPs have humans, and that's just cause their being animals matters and shapes the characters that they are. If humans and anthros share a setting, it opens up possibilities for conflict and cooperation that should be taken. The real crime is if the writer includes very different species or cultures and doesn't explore those possibilities at all.

Besides, humans have some very interesting evolutionary features. Very few animals can regenerate stamina almost as quickly as they use it, but thanks to sweat humans are one of the animals that can accomplish this, giving us physical endurance way above the mammalian average. We had to give up almost all our 'fur' to accomplish this feat, but the payoff was worth it, allowing us to survive well before we started fine-tuning our tool making and missile weapon skills. Canines are among the few that can keep up on long-distance runs, which is probably a big part of why dogs/wolves were domesticated before any other animal.
 

Werewhen

Member
Depends on the story or what the author wants to do with idea of having both humans and anthros or one or the other in the world I guess, case by case basis.
 

Toby_Morpheus

Hello, Proto
>Obligatory "This is a hell of a necro" comment.

Surprised nobody pointed it out yet lol
 

Balskarr

The Lurking Hooman
>Obligatory "This is a hell of a necro" comment.

Surprised nobody pointed it out yet lol
Aye. Also surprised. Surprised even more it hasn't been taken down yet considering how quick I always see necro'd threads go down.

Weirder still seeing my own comment from a few years ago.
 

Baalf

Will accept free hugs and tummy rubs.
I say include Humans if there's a need to demonstrate the distinctiveness of anthros. A lot of 'humans are dull' impressions come from the fact that all the anthro characters are just humans who happen to look like animals, therefore making the inclusion of humans totally superfluous and unnecessary. On the flipside, a story where the entire cast is anthros can still come off as silly if none of those anthros' species matter, since you could just tell that story with all humans and achieve the same effect.

Contrast Zootopia and Beastars, where the social dialogue around species is central to the story, characters, and themes, to a movie like Sing, where the choice of species is just made on what will sell more toys and is completely unnecessary to the plot. Zootopia and Beastars are much more memorable to broad audiences, even though none of the three IPs have humans, and that's just cause their being animals matters and shapes the characters that they are. If humans and anthros share a setting, it opens up possibilities for conflict and cooperation that should be taken. The real crime is if the writer includes very different species or cultures and doesn't explore those possibilities at all.

Besides, humans have some very interesting evolutionary features. Very few animals can regenerate stamina almost as quickly as they use it, but thanks to sweat humans are one of the animals that can accomplish this, giving us physical endurance way above the mammalian average. We had to give up almost all our 'fur' to accomplish this feat, but the payoff was worth it, allowing us to survive well before we started fine-tuning our tool making and missile weapon skills. Canines are among the few that can keep up on long-distance runs, which is probably a big part of why dogs/wolves were domesticated before any other animal.

honestly, I disagree. When I see something has anthropomorphic animals, that gets my attention. Video games I wouldn't otherwise be interested in become instant buys for me if they have them. Even if they are just quote on quote humans disguised as animals, which I also disagree with, it's still cool seeing your favorite animals in a piece of media as something other than generic bad guys. Plus, they look more interesting than regular humans. While looks aren't my only problem with human characters, or even my biggest problem, they are a problem nonetheless.

I'm writing a book that is currently going through beta testing that stars a bunch of anthropomorphic animal hybrids. Do they need to be them as opposed to humans? In my opinion, yeah. It makes the book more interesting and fun to write. Could the book actually be told with humans? Surprisingly, not to the extent that you might assume. I at least try to give all my species their own different abilities. One character is based off a species with a prehensile tail, and the character actually uses that quite often. Another character is based off of species that can breathe underwater. Another species is an anthropomorphic bear that has a real bears sense of smell, and you would be surprised how often his sense of smell comes in handy. And then there is another species that is so intelligent that they have limited magic abilities. Each species also has standard builds, and many of the character is follow a lifestyle similar to sumo wrestlers, and some species are more adapt to that lifestyle than others, with the main hero with the prehensile tail having a harder time at it than his peers.

I'd also argue that anthro character is work better for a silly setting such as sumo wrestling monster that fight crime. It's true that humans work well in serious settings, but to be honest, I'm not a fan of those types of settings. I prefer wacky and whimsical.
 

Biscayne

many dumb animals
I like humans alongside anthros in modern settings, but not in fantasy ones. I think cuz when I think of fantasy anthros I tend to think of stuff like Redwall, whereas modern stuff I tend to view as more human-y. Shrug!!
 

Baalf

Will accept free hugs and tummy rubs.
... Like amphibia and stuff like that?
Yeah, stuff like that: where the human is from another world (isekai). Although it doesn't have to be that extreme. I also like when the human character just so happens to live where there are no other humans in the community (...other than perhaps the human's family).
 

Angelcakes

Well-Known Member
I'm all for the whole 'Beauty and the Beast' thing, so I say 'yay Humans'!
 

oappo

Well-Known Member
Necro aside, I prefer no humans.

Furries, to me, have their own distinct appeal. I see no point in including humans unless there's something going on with the story. For variety, I'd rather just go with different animal species than humans.

The real crime is if the writer includes very different species or cultures and doesn't explore those possibilities at all.
I can't really agree with this personally. It feels forced to me if this exploration absolutely must take place. Anthropocentric stories don't always do this with our own variation(skin colour,nationality, sexuality,ect).
 

Frank Gulotta

Send us your floppy
If I'm going with a history where civilization looks like what it looks like now, it makes more sense to have humans in it be a driving force, or at least it's much simpler to set up. Take clothes for instance, why would you even need those if you have fur? why would you cook food if you already have everything you need? but then in the country next door, that's populated with humans, they've developed all these things; anthros see and like a lot of it, so they replicate it while adapting it to their own needs. That's how I see things
 

Firuthi Dragovic

World Serpent, overly defensive
On the "no humans" side of this, generally speaking. Though some of that is because one of the settings I've been working on specifically has the furries be a mutation of humanity.

Honestly, mixing humans and non-humans requires some thought and that's all I'm going to say on the matter.
 

Mambi

Fun loving kitty cat
Do you prefer there being humans alongside the anthros in the same setting or do you prefer having no humans?

I usually prefer without as we have enough humans, but if the humans are treated as just another creature and not as a separate class of being, then it's better I suppose.

For example, Disney has lots of human and animal characters. In some movies the animals are basically servants to the humans. It's clearly a human world and the animals, even tough they can walk and talk and wear clothes and the like are still clearly animals in a human world. That would be the "not wanted" type to me...I want to see humans as equals if they have to appear at all. I want to see animals in an animal world, where humans are guests if they are there at all.
 

Filter

ɹǝʇlᴉℲ
I usually lean toward no humans. My animal characters are basically human substitutes, like in another dimension where the people have animal traits. It's not so much that I have a problem with human and furry characters being in the same world. It just avoids similar awkwardness that you get when furries have pets. Imagine a human and anthropomorphic cat charcter are roommates, and they also have a (non-anthro) pet cat. That might be a little confusing. Again, I don't have a problem with it, but I tend to keep furry characters with their kind.

On the other hand, I'd totally live in a world with real furries. That sounds awesome, so I can definitely see it working.
 

Arnak

Off the bench
I don't mind humans. Just makes romance so scandalous and exciting
 

Existenceinanutshell

Well-Known Member
I personally like a setting that mixes in both human and anthro characters.

Like the project I'm working on calls anthro beings "demi-humans" or "beastkin" or "Children of Seth" depending on where you are in the world and the beliefs of that part of the world.

Humans sharing a world with anthro characters can allow for more creative freedom in terms of design and possible stories you can tell due to the difference between the species or the world that is born from them both coexisting can be interesting.
 

Stray Cat Terry

테리 / 特里 / テリー
As I don't like single-raced themes, I would use all the races since single race taking the whole world can be pretty predictable and lacks diversity than multi-raced.

The following is about my universe setups, the anthros took over the forsaken Earth, and then they thrived as a new human race. Later some of the original human returned to Earth without success to find their new homeworld, only to find out the new race has taken over their once homeworld, with different tech and stuff.

Isn't it intimating?
 
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