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Humans will become obsolete

Cannabiskitty

To Kill the Child; to Set the Adult Free
replacing a cashier with a self-serve touchscreen monitor is hardly new. i wouldn't be surprised if you could order and pay from your mobile phone and have it ready when you get there in the near future.

That is already a thing right now actually.
 
M

modfox

Guest
humans are the most destructive species. we will probably wipe ourselves out in nuclear war before robots take over.
 

Cyco-Dude

Member
But what happens when there ARE no more jobs for people to find, because they've all been taken over by robots? That's basically the point that this whole video makes. And I'm citing those other countries as comparisons to what our society would look like because of the displacement of the labor force, it isn't about the reasons for why those countries are in the states they're in. I'm talking about the occurrence of patterns of chaos and social breakdown that mirror what they've experienced, even though the reasons are different.
oh, what crazy fantasy stories we weave...if we're going to make things up, why not imagine something better? let's see here...with no jobs (and no need for money), everything is free and we're able to pursue various studies in order to better ourselves (or not). you know...like in star trek. oh wait, they had jobs in star trek...nevermind. :p
 

Gryffe

Member
Anyway, it's hard to be mild in the prediction. Either the world will collapses on itself in utter anarchy or we'll end in some sort of utopia where self-sustaining robot workforce will do all the work for us and nobody will do anything besides killing time all day long. Maybe some of us will keep doing some meaningless jobs just to stay sane, but that's it. However, for a complete replacement of human work with robots, we first need to give them strong AI and not weak AI like we have now. And making this technological leap will take decades at best.

Honestly, what should worry us the most is the transitory state. When we'll have enough cheap machines to do nearly all manual labor but no strong AIs to take care of the intellectual work. That'll lead to a society where anyone who isn't heavily qualified will be left to rot on the sideway while intelectual profession will still be healthy but under pressure for the remaining places. Too much unemployed people not to stir troubles, but not enough machines to justify the end of society as we know it (ie : getting a job, getting paid for it, living off the money we make).
 
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