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i hate new tech

Nexus Cabler

\ ( :v ) /
Expressing thoughts and concerns about the unknown future and even present time is basic human nature and this extends to the category of technology.
The past 20 to 30 years has had dramatically quick changes and for some people it's difficult to acclimate to for a variety of reasons.

Opinions of dangerous outcomes are not automatically a symptom of terrorist tendencies, Percy. The majority of people have at minimum mixed feelings on social media, games, industries, and privacy.

If you feel comfortable with the pace of change in the world around us, that's perfectly alright, but people who feel otherwise shouldn't be passive aggressively compared to a domestic terrorist for shits and giggles.
 
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Green_Brick

Krita user
I'm glad that the internet has gotten much larger, and how easily information is accessible to everyone. Such as ways that online security is exploited to collect your data, and the preventative measures one could take to prevent your own personal information from being collected and used by other entities!
 

Nexus Cabler

\ ( :v ) /
I agree that the internet has helped the world dramatically. Access to information like health, medicine, education, and emergency warnings like weather, attacks, or other threats at the click of a button has saved many lives. It's certainly helped me get through college.

It's great to see this being more and more reachable to people all across the world. There are potential and existing hazards, but most of them can be fought off with smart judgment.
 

Miles Marsalis

The Last DJ.
Expressing thoughts and concerns about the unknown future and even present time is basic human nature and this extends to the category of technology.
The past 20 to 30 years has had dramatically quick changes and for some people it's difficult to acclimate to for a variety of reasons.

Opinions of dangerous outcomes are not automatically a symptom of terrorist tendencies, Percy. The majority of people have at minimum mixed feelings on social media, games, industries, and privacy.

If you feel comfortable with the pace of change in the world around us, that's perfectly alright, but people who feel otherwise shouldn't be passive aggressively compared to a domestic terrorist for shits and giggles.
I mean, Percy just said they had vibes, not that people have terrorist sympathies.

Yeah, though, planned obsolescence is annoying and wasteful and some sectors of the tech industries have adopted practices that are more focused on extracting money from consumers rather than innovation. I'd personally point out that how we deal, or don't deal, with e-waste is major concern, from how wasteful of resources it is, to how it affects the health of workers who handle it, and to how we need better ways to recycle electronics.

However, we live in a capitalist system with a more or less free market where consumers don't have to buy products from manufacturers or sellers they disagree with. There are also social movements like the Right To Repair or organizations like the Electronic Freedom Foundation they can join if they feel strongly about it.

It's worth asking how many complaining about the issues currently inherent in new technology actually abstain from buying the products and services they don't like anyway.
 
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Frank Gulotta

Send us your floppy
Yeah that user didn't say you had terrorist sympathies for having concerns about big tech surveillance, they just said it gave terrorist sympathy VIBES. VIBES man. What a big fucking difference!
(then again the only one seeing the nuance is also the one who's fine with having his internet connection monitored by boss so...)
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
I mean, Percy just said they had vibes, not that people have terrorist sympathies.

Yeah, though, planned obsolescence is annoying and wasteful and some sectors of the tech industries have adopted practices that are more focused on extracting money from consumers rather than innovation. I'd personally point out that how we deal, or don't deal, with e-waste is major concern, from how wasteful of resources it is, to how it affects the health of workers who handle it, and to how we need better ways to recycle electronics.

However, we live in a capitalist system with a more or less free market where consumers don't have to buy products from manufacturers or sellers they disagree with. There are also social movements like the Right To Repair or organizations like the Electronic Freedom Foundation they can join if they feel strongly about it.

It's worth asking how many complaining about the issues currently inherent in new technology actually abstain from buying the products and services they don't like anyway.
It's pretty impossible to have a normal professional life without buying technology that is wasteful or difficult to repair.

Like, if I had the luxury of the extra money I'd buy a washing machine that was going to last 10 years, but often people only have enough money for the cheap version that breaks down and goes straight to landfill. :\
 

PercyD

Lover of Beasty Baes
Expressing thoughts and concerns about the unknown future and even present time is basic human nature and this extends to the category of technology.
The past 20 to 30 years has had dramatically quick changes and for some people it's difficult to acclimate to for a variety of reasons.

Opinions of dangerous outcomes are not automatically a symptom of terrorist tendencies, Percy. The majority of people have at minimum mixed feelings on social media, games, industries, and privacy.

If you feel comfortable with the pace of change in the world around us, that's perfectly alright, but people who feel otherwise shouldn't be passive aggressively compared to a domestic terrorist for shits and giggles.
Literally happened over 50 years ago plus Futurama had an episode about it. But alright...
 

PercyD

Lover of Beasty Baes
However, we live in a capitalist system with a more or less free market where consumers don't have to buy products from manufacturers or sellers they disagree with. There are also social movements like the Right To Repair or organizations like the Electronic Freedom Foundation they can join if they feel strongly about it.

It's worth asking how many complaining about the issues currently inherent in new technology actually abstain from buying the products and services they don't like anyway.
That is a more interesting thing to talk about. Somebody ran doom on a John Deere tractor just because they could.

Plus you have so many communities around programming projects like Krita. Just like how it's become easier to create studio quality content and animation, I hope this trend begins to extend over consumer products as well.

All these small businesses pitch in, buy a factory in some small town in the South and create their own damned consumer products.
 

Pomorek

Antelope-Addicted Hyena
So, another little project of mine, I think it fits here (and I rather avoid multiplying the threads beyond necessity). The 10-years-old Lenovo Yoga 13 mentioned on the first page started to appear reaching the end of its useful life. Windows has unevitably grown big during that decade, it's useless background processes clogging the paltry 4GB of RAM this device has, and making the CPU go constantly. The fans were whirring loudly all the time and the temperatures started getting uncomfortably high lately. Wifi connectivity appeared to be getting worse and worse too, with increasingly frequent breaks despite the device standing in the same place all the time.

At some point there was nothing to lose anymore, so I put my now-favorite Linux Manjaro on it. Immediate surprise: the laptop got much more quiet. When it's doing nothing, it is doing nothing - unlike under Windows, where all sorts of only-gods-know-what background processes would run hecticly. Also RAM usage below 1GB on idle. On KDE desktop, once said to be so RAM-heavy. Touchscreen, webcam, microphone and BT on this device work too out of the box.

Still, encumbering the CPU some more would cause the temperature rise to the point where the part of the bottom would get too hot to touch. Also the fans would go like a vacuum cleaner. After dismantling the laptop it turned out - obviously - that the thermal paste is all dry and cracked and the exhaust vent is packed with dust. Thorough cleaning and new paste brought the temperatures to below 70C even during longer 100% loads, with the fans being audible but no longer obnoxious.

So at a cost of a several hours work, some cleaning fluid and two big drops of thermal paste I turned a failing laptop into one that's again perfectly good for browsing the web and all manners of not-overly-demanding tasks, such as office stuff. Many cheapest new laptops one can buy today don't seem to be much more versatile despite having nominally much more powerful hardware. Any more demanding game, or more demanding 3D project (and my 3D projects are demanding) would be no fun on them - just as on this old Lenovo.

Biggest surprise, the battery hardly holding for 40 minutes under Windows (and practically deemed useless because of that) turned out to be good for up to 2 hours under Linux. 10 years old, mind you... Also, I yet have to get a wifi break under Linux, it ran stable for over 12 hours of testing in total.

Old games from the 90s work fine too, bonus point that emulators tend to be Linux-friendly. In fact, this refurbishment went so well that I'm thinking about digging around the used parts market and switching the RAM for 8 GB (highest that this model can accept) and adding another SSD aside from the current 128 GB - yes, upon opening it turned out there's an empty mSATA slot in there.
 

PercyD

Lover of Beasty Baes
So, another little project of mine, I think it fits here (and I rather avoid multiplying the threads beyond necessity). The 10-years-old Lenovo Yoga 13 mentioned on the first page started to appear reaching the end of its useful life. Windows has unevitably grown big during that decade, it's useless background processes clogging the paltry 4GB of RAM this device has, and making the CPU go constantly. The fans were whirring loudly all the time and the temperatures started getting uncomfortably high lately. Wifi connectivity appeared to be getting worse and worse too, with increasingly frequent breaks despite the device standing in the same place all the time.

At some point there was nothing to lose anymore, so I put my now-favorite Linux Manjaro on it. Immediate surprise: the laptop got much more quiet. When it's doing nothing, it is doing nothing - unlike under Windows, where all sorts of only-gods-know-what background processes would run hecticly. Also RAM usage below 1GB on idle. On KDE desktop, once said to be so RAM-heavy. Touchscreen, webcam, microphone and BT on this device work too out of the box.

Still, encumbering the CPU some more would cause the temperature rise to the point where the part of the bottom would get too hot to touch. Also the fans would go like a vacuum cleaner. After dismantling the laptop it turned out - obviously - that the thermal paste is all dry and cracked and the exhaust vent is packed with dust. Thorough cleaning and new paste brought the temperatures to below 70C even during longer 100% loads, with the fans being audible but no longer obnoxious.

So at a cost of a several hours work, some cleaning fluid and two big drops of thermal paste I turned a failing laptop into one that's again perfectly good for browsing the web and all manners of not-overly-demanding tasks, such as office stuff. Many cheapest new laptops one can buy today don't seem to be much more versatile despite having nominally much more powerful hardware. Any more demanding game, or more demanding 3D project (and my 3D projects are demanding) would be no fun on them - just as on this old Lenovo.

Biggest surprise, the battery hardly holding for 40 minutes under Windows (and practically deemed useless because of that) turned out to be good for up to 2 hours under Linux. 10 years old, mind you... Also, I yet have to get a wifi break under Linux, it ran stable for over 12 hours of testing in total.

Old games from the 90s work fine too, bonus point that emulators tend to be Linux-friendly. In fact, this refurbishment went so well that I'm thinking about digging around the used parts market and switching the RAM for 8 GB (highest that this model can accept) and adding another SSD aside from the current 128 GB - yes, upon opening it turned out there's an empty mSATA slot in there.
I love Linux for this reason. You can get some functionality out of old tech for a few years fairly easily.
 
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