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I have a some questions about writing. Help me

Falafox

Chaotic Neutral
Since I discovered they furry fandom I always thought that writing a furry fiction would be pretty nice since I love making up characters and settings.



  • My english can get pretty bad sometimes

Yes,english is not my main language and I can mess up really bad sometimes and it can get a little confusing. I am always looking to improve but should I get someone to check my spelling when I write?


  • Could a story be focused about characters and not the plot itself?

I would really like to write about characters relationships and growth through the whole story, is that right?

  • Any general tips or things I should never do?

Basically that.

Thanks for reading!
 

Auramaru

Archmage of the Wandering Isle
The first story I ever wrote had nothing to do with any plot... It was just some characters of mine growing up and me basically playing "house". I guess I have to ask who is your audience and what is your goal as a writer. If you're writing for your own enjoyment, then ANYTHING goes.

Characterization plays a crucial role in writing, and I think if you just messed around and wrote a story that's "focused about characters and not the plot itself", then you could learn a few things from it, work up some confidence, and learn your own style.

I guess my main point is: There isn't such a thing as "failure" in writing. Unless it's your job to write: then have fun with it. You can only learn by trying different things, seeing what works, and what doesn't. Some people learn quickly and some need some more time.

You should write about what you like, save a copy of it, and look back on it to learn how to develop from there. Never delete a story or copy simply because you think it is stupid. You can ALWAYS learn something from your past works.

Your English might not be great or it might be "bad", but if you read some English novels and write in your free time (with someone checking your spelling and grammar) you should come out alright.

I guess that's all I've got to say. Hope I helped.
 

Aleu

Deuces
For the English bit, you can always have someone else proofread your story who, you know, speaks English.

Character growth stories are good. I don't see any harm in that. It's getting to know the character on a deeper level.
 

Gnarl

The Arcane Sage
Often times the Character development is the plot! the whole story may be about a single person sometimes even a single event in that persons life. The story is what happened to them, how did they feel, did they grow as a person, was it a trauma or something that they laugh at now? Is the story set in the present, the past: as in being recalled by the main character? Was there a deeper meaning to this event or series of events?
 

Cain

Guess what mood I'm in today.
Proofreading would definitely help, but writing in itself would also increase your fluency and grasp of the English language. Nobody wants to read something that has spelling and/or grammatical errors throughout.

When you ask if 'the plot can be more focused on the characters rather than the plot', what you really should be asking is...Nothing, really. The question doesn't make sense. Plot and characters are not interchangeable elements of a story, rather they are one with each other, among other things, to formulate a story. Your character development can be your plot. Your plot can be your character development.
Of course, it does take a degree of balance to write a good story.

Namely, though, the characters within a story are usually one of the most important things. If you have bland characters, the reader won't see much beyond them, even if you do have some fantastic storyline. Since the characters are what the reader associates with and develops bonds with, you could easily say that characters and their development are much more important than plot itself (again, character development would be a part of the plot, so what I'm saying is a bit null but bear with me). You can have a bland storyline, one that has been used over and over, like the classic adventure to rescue a princess, or a band of friends going on a trip, or a tsundere-like school romance (I watch a lot of anime okay).
What can make these stories special, though, are the characters. If you have well-developed characters with interesting quirks to each personality, and different ways of interacting them with one another, the story can be as tropish as you like, as the reader is more likely to associate with the characters better and put the story on a lower shelf (I'm sort of delving into more anime-type rather than classical prose, but again bear with me)

Personally, I am in the process of (and have been for quite some time because I'm a little procrastinating bitch) writing a story which is practically all about characters.
Like I said, the character and his/her/their development can be all what the story is, and that is precisely what mine is. Eliminating the element of a more traditional plot outline can open up your scope to develop your character/s incredibly well, to a point where the reader doesn't want to put the book down because s/he feels incredibly attached to said character.

But yeah.
My two cents.
 

Conker

Destroyer of Nazi Teddy Bears
You should probably find someone to proof read your stuff if you aren't confident about the English language. No harm there. Most people who speak English as their native tongue really should find proofreaders. God the stuff that I've stumbled upon.

As to your second question: Yes. That's fine.

As to your third question: My advice is to start. Experiment and play around and just have fun. But it all starts with starting.
 

Falafox

Chaotic Neutral
Thanks for everything, also the newbie writer guide compilation has taught me in 1 hour what it would take some months in school.
 

SnC

New Member
I've written stories before, and I've spent a ton of time thinking about exactly the questions you asked.

All stories can be broken down into three main elements: characters and character relationships, the plot, and a fictional world. The main goal of a story is to send a message to the reader. It can be artistic, it can be social or moral commentary, or whatever you want. But all the best stories make the reader think about life in some way. In order to send this message, a writer uses the story's plot to describe some interesting set of changes between the characters and their fictional world. In this way, the characters, the plot, and the universe all relate to each other.

Now, on to writing tips! I can't give you much advice on what your characters should look like, how to design your universe, or what your message should be. That's up to you. But I can give you these three tips:

1) Make lots of brainstorm documents. Have a separate document to describe each character, several documents to describe the world, and a lot more to describe all the important details of the plot. Write whatever you want in these documents. Do whatever you need to get the characters, the plot, and the world straightened out in your head.

2) Make sure everything is internally consistent! This means that your characters should always act according to their beliefs (and if they don't, it should cause problems later on), that magic and technology in your universe should behave according to a well-established set of rules that you show early on in the story, and that you don't introduce tons of random plot events without warning. If your story isn't consistent, you destroy a reader's suspension of disbelief. When a reader loses suspension of disbelief, they stop reading.

Let's say your hero has just defeated the bad guy with a magic spell. In a bad story, a reader will think: "Wow, that was cheap. This hero is way too powerful. Why didn't he just do that at the beginning of the story?"
But in a good story, this is what your reader will say: "Oh crap! That totally makes sense. Magic in this universe always behaves that way. It was really smart of the hero to collect those magic gems early on. I totally knew he was going to do that!"

3) Every word, letter, and sentence must either advance the plot, develop a character, or describe the fictional world. Remember this any time you decide to write. Think about this any time you type out a sentence. If the words you just added do not advance the plot, develop a character, or describe the fictional universe, then you should remove those words from the story. At its core, writing is just arranging words in a specific order on a screen. Every word has its job to do to make that arrangement right. If you don't know the purpose of some word, it probably shouldn't be in your story.

Anyway, that's what I think about writing. I can give you more specific advice later on. If you want me to proofread anything, just send me a message. But it might take me a few days to get to, because college.
 

Tica

Lady Sloth
I would suggest writing your story in your native language first and then translating it later, rather than trying to learn to write in a foreign language.
 

Falafox

Chaotic Neutral
I've written stories before, and I've spent a ton of time thinking about exactly the questions you asked.

All stories can be broken down into three main elements: characters and character relationships, the plot, and a fictional world. The main goal of a story is to send a message to the reader. It can be artistic, it can be social or moral commentary, or whatever you want. But all the best stories make the reader think about life in some way. In order to send this message, a writer uses the story's plot to describe some interesting set of changes between the characters and their fictional world. In this way, the characters, the plot, and the universe all relate to each other.

Now, on to writing tips! I can't give you much advice on what your characters should look like, how to design your universe, or what your message should be. That's up to you. But I can give you these three tips:

1) Make lots of brainstorm documents. Have a separate document to describe each character, several documents to describe the world, and a lot more to describe all the important details of the plot. Write whatever you want in these documents. Do whatever you need to get the characters, the plot, and the world straightened out in your head.

2) Make sure everything is internally consistent! This means that your characters should always act according to their beliefs (and if they don't, it should cause problems later on), that magic and technology in your universe should behave according to a well-established set of rules that you show early on in the story, and that you don't introduce tons of random plot events without warning. If your story isn't consistent, you destroy a reader's suspension of disbelief. When a reader loses suspension of disbelief, they stop reading.

Let's say your hero has just defeated the bad guy with a magic spell. In a bad story, a reader will think: "Wow, that was cheap. This hero is way too powerful. Why didn't he just do that at the beginning of the story?"
But in a good story, this is what your reader will say: "Oh crap! That totally makes sense. Magic in this universe always behaves that way. It was really smart of the hero to collect those magic gems early on. I totally knew he was going to do that!"

3) Every word, letter, and sentence must either advance the plot, develop a character, or describe the fictional world. Remember this any time you decide to write. Think about this any time you type out a sentence. If the words you just added do not advance the plot, develop a character, or describe the fictional universe, then you should remove those words from the story. At its core, writing is just arranging words in a specific order on a screen. Every word has its job to do to make that arrangement right. If you don't know the purpose of some word, it probably shouldn't be in your story.

Anyway, that's what I think about writing. I can give you more specific advice later on. If you want me to proofread anything, just send me a message. But it might take me a few days to get to, because college.

Thank you!
I'll start to use the first step as soon as I start to make my first history! The others ones are realy useful as well, thank you again.
I would suggest writing your story in your native language first and then translating it later, rather than trying to learn to write in a foreign language.

It seems good at first glance, but in the long run it dosen't help that much. The first step to be good at something, is to suck at it!
 
Last edited:

coso

Big Brother
if you want to focus on the characters, you can make a plot to focus on them. Forcing them to deal with difficult situations in which to display their personalities and relationships between them. Many times, relationships force to continue the story. But I notice, a great plot helps a lot to develop characters.

The characters always must change with the story, they should have an evolution.

If you have not written before, you should take time to focus the main characters, choose their personality and their goals. This is a way of creating characters that do not resemble each other too much. I hope i have helped you. ;)

A salute, Coso.
 
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