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I have autism...Help!

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Crazydaisy

Guest
Guys I have autism and I feel with it I can't be a happy guy. I know I'm artisic but I just don't have any social skills or talking skills. With me I feel without my autism I can feel I can talk to people. Please give me some advise. Thank you!
 
B

BlueWorrior

Guest
I have Asperger's and have had many struggles with social situations and communication.
My school years weren't easy: I was picked on and made fun of on a regular basis, because people in school are all awkward and hormonally unbalanced arsehats and I was weird enough to be a vocal punching bag.
Some of my worst days were in school, but I got through it. Looking back on myself, I have made tremendous progress compared to how I was. All it took was the determination to improve yourself.
I would suggest you go to a professional about it. I scrapped through, but you don't have to do it alone like I did.
 

DoeDog

Well-Known Member
Seek professional help, get diagnosed properly, the more you know about yourself the better you know yourself the better the better your life gets, I have looked for professional help in the past for unrelated matters and it works, takes time but you end up feeling better, mind just like the body, you break a bone you go to a doctor you feel weird, depressed, etc go to a licensed psychiatrist, or psychologist and get stuff solved.
 

Nyapano

Friendly & Fluffy Fennec Fox :33
I would say practice. Find a social environment and start talking whenever you can. Try not to be intrusive, yet stay confident. Before long, you'll easily pick up any core social skills you may be missing, even a few more advanced ones. I know from experience this can work, really well too. Best of luck ^^
 

Yakamaru

Bara mig och lite bensin
Autism is unique in that it is a broad as fuck spectrum, and ranging from heavy Autism to so mild you barely notice it. Personally I have Asperger's and I have a love/hate relationship with it.

Never believe something that is a part of you as being a negative thing. Autistic people often tend to have more specialized skills, for instance being able to draw easily due to good limb control, have a lot of knowledge on a subject, photographic memory, you name it.

Autism often enhances your mental abilities but your social abilities often tend to take a hit to the groin. Your brain is wired slightly differently than those of a normal person, which allows for "out of the box thinking" and being able to approach something from a different angle.

The important thing is the desire to better understand it. Better understanding of it, so you can improve yourself socially.
 

Tate Coyote

♛Queen of Coyotes♛
I studied psychology when I was in college, and really focused on the mental disorder aspect of it. Autism is one of those disorders where you can kinda figure out your "triggers" and either avoid them if they're overbearing, or learn ways to cope and get around them, so to speak. Kind of like someone with PTSD (like myself). I have triggers where, if I see certain things or hear certain songs, I go into severe panic attacks. I've learned to avoid the ones that cause the panic attacks, and learned to somewhat redirect that energy to something else to reassociate the trigger with a more pleasant experience.

As for the social aspect of it, just practice. Start small, like asking for extra ketchup at a restaurant. Work your way up until you can walk up to a stranger and give them a compliment without feeling like a creeper haha.
 

Somnium

The Sparklewolf
Banned
Kind of like someone with PTSD (like myself). I have triggers where, if I see certain things or hear certain songs, I go into severe panic attacks. I've learned to avoid the ones that cause the panic attacks, and learned to somewhat redirect that energy to something else to reassociate the trigger with a more pleasant experience.

While this isn't a bad advice it's not addressing the actual porblem. It's like going to the doctor and telling him your legs hurt when you walk. Then the doctor says, oh we have just what you need:
LTWT_WHEELCHAIR_LRG_6.jpg

I had a traumatic experience not so long ago and I would love to solve those triggers, instead of running away from them, because they sometimes catch you by surprise
 

Tate Coyote

♛Queen of Coyotes♛
I had a traumatic experience not so long ago and I would love to solve those triggers, instead of running away from them, because they sometimes catch you by surprise

I'm not saying run away from them. I'm saying avoid the ones you knowingly cause too much stress to handle at a certain point in time.

*****TRIGGER WARNING*****

One of my worst triggers is anything to do with self mutilation. I can't see it. If I do, I instantly go into a massive panic attack where I black out, I don't know/remember what's going on, and it takes me anywhere between a few minutes to a couple of hours to come out of it. Going out to watch a new movie is always a risk for me.

Now, taking that and flipping it around. When I was a kid, I would go stay at my cousin's house (we grew up like sisters) and her psychotic stepfather would grab me and hold a gun to my head, cocked and loaded, and threaten to blow my head off if his wife didn't have dinner done in an hour. For a long time, guns scared the hell out of me. I didn't want anything to do with them. Until I decided I wanted to join the military, and in turn I needed to be comfortable with them. I had my father teach me how to handle a gun, everything from a pistol to a rifle and shotgun. I got more and more confident. I finally bought my own gun, and inherited a couple. I took something VERY traumatic and scary and turned it around.
 

Somnium

The Sparklewolf
Banned
I'm not saying run away from them. I'm saying avoid the ones you knowingly cause too much stress to handle at a certain point in time.

*****TRIGGER WARNING*****

One of my worst triggers is anything to do with self mutilation. I can't see it. If I do, I instantly go into a massive panic attack where I black out, I don't know/remember what's going on, and it takes me anywhere between a few minutes to a couple of hours to come out of it. Going out to watch a new movie is always a risk for me.

Now, taking that and flipping it around. When I was a kid, I would go stay at my cousin's house (we grew up like sisters) and her psychotic stepfather would grab me and hold a gun to my head, cocked and loaded, and threaten to blow my head off if his wife didn't have dinner done in an hour. For a long time, guns scared the hell out of me. I didn't want anything to do with them. Until I decided I wanted to join the military, and in turn I needed to be comfortable with them. I had my father teach me how to handle a gun, everything from a pistol to a rifle and shotgun. I got more and more confident. I finally bought my own gun, and inherited a couple. I took something VERY traumatic and scary and turned it around.

Holy shit that doesn't sound good. My triggers just makes me feel anxious.
 

Tate Coyote

♛Queen of Coyotes♛
I was professionally counseled to do a reverse "Pavlov" theory on my triggers that I feel I can overcome. (Like the gun thing.) It's also something we were taught to counsel during clinicals.
 

reptile logic

An imposter among aliens.
I would say practice. Find a social environment and start talking whenever you can. Try not to be intrusive, yet stay confident. Before long, you'll easily pick up any core social skills you may be missing, even a few more advanced ones. I know from experience this can work, really well too. Best of luck ^^

Agreed. I was diagnosed with Asperger's later in life; though it was clear early on to myself and my family and few friends that I was odd. About 17 years ago, I met someone who became my closest friend. He recognized my intelligence, as well as my difficulty in social situations. My friend helped me get diagnosed. He also spent the time and energy to help me to alter my outlook on social situations as well as my behavior in those situations. I also learned to adapt better to crowded environments; though they still can wear me out rather quickly. Not everyone can be so fortunate but recognizing the situations and learning to behave appropriately, even if the social cues are not recognized by you instinctively, can go a long way toward allowing you to feel more comfortable in social situations. Learn you limits, and don't allow yourself to become overwhelmed. That said, push your limits every chance you get; your tolerance will likely grow stronger.
 

EdgyMemeLord0

Master of succ
One of my classmates is autistic too.
He has asperger's
He is a pretty nice guy but he also has difficulties in communication and he has a lot of "ticks" (He moves his hands in a weird way, he somehow makes little "jumps" and makes a variety of strange noises.. But after 5 years you get used to him...
Sometimes I also think about whether I also might have a very light case of autism too....or I'm just weird (more likely)
 

RileyTheOtter

The Autistic Otter
One of my classmates is autistic too.
He has asperger's
He is a pretty nice guy but he also has difficulties in communication and he has a lot of "ticks" (He moves his hands in a weird way, he somehow makes little "jumps" and makes a variety of strange noises.. But after 5 years you get used to him...
Sometimes I also think about whether I also might have a very light case of autism too....or I'm just weird (more likely)
tics (not ticks) are usually associated with tourette's (I have Asperger's and Tourette's) but i also can make strange noises...(I can sound like a pig by using my tongue while my mouth is closed) and have my own fair share of stories of how it affected me (as did it going undiagnosed until I was 13 simply because I'm capable of and actually pretty good at lying)
 

EdgyMemeLord0

Master of succ
tics (not ticks) are usually associated with tourette's (I have Asperger's and Tourette's) but i also can make strange noises...(I can sound like a pig by using my tongue while my mouth is closed) and have my own fair share of stories of how it affected me (as did it going undiagnosed until I was 13 simply because I'm capable of and actually pretty good at lying)
Mind it if you could tell at least one story?
 

RileyTheOtter

The Autistic Otter
Mind it if you could tell at least one story?
want to hear the stories of how it made my school life such a living hell due to my ignorant asshole bunch of classmates that I dared a cop (who was at the school because of my supernova reaction to 9 years of unending harassment and torture) to shoot me at 13 (before I was diagnosed with Asperger's), or the stories of how in my attempts to get bullies to back off and leave me alone I drove away all of my irl friends in the process which also lead to the aforementioned incident? there's so many I could tell, but frankly they all lead to that day...none of them are positive until AFTER I turned 16.

the easiest way to explain it is through a blog my mom made.
 

The Technovorous Cats.

I like circuit boards.
I have Autism too. Bare in mind, I have a less obvious form of it. Anyone with Autism can feel the differences between them and 'normal' people. The social aspect gets easier over time. It takes years of practice just to feel at level with someone. If you were to talk to some one, they seem to have something behind the voice, don't they? It isn't a secret emotion or something just as odd. This is your mind showing you that there is a gap to bridge. This is how your social side shows you how to grow. The more you talk, the more you stop noticing this gap. I hope this is helpful to you.
 
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