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Critique: I need some critiques on my recent art

Bxb777

Well-Known Member
Heya! I have been doing art for 3-4 years by now, and I have been trying to improve myself as an artist like always. Recently (past few months) I've felt like my art progression has been slowed down, s recently I've been practicing a lot on stuff. I just want to find more ways on I can improve on my art and stuff, here is some examples.
1578252839.bxb777_untitled885_20200105142900.png

1577906159.bxb777_untitled865_20200101140914.png

1577749297.bxb777_untitled861_20191230183040.png



If there is anything you want me to improve on, please let me know!
 

Bxb777

Well-Known Member
I think most of the art is nice, but you could work on your anatomy and shading just a bit more. That last picture is adorable, I like the art style a lot, but I think it would be improved if you did some shading on it as well.

All in all, keep up the good work!
Anatomy is actually the one i want to focus on the most atm. Trust me it looked a lot worse a few months back, BUT I think i still need to improve on it a lot :3
 

Liseran Thistle

They/Them
Anatomy is actually the one i want to focus on the most atm. Trust me it looked a lot worse a few months back, BUT I think i still need to improve on it a lot :3

I have trouble with Anatomy as well, and it's really tough so I know the pain. I can't draw very realistic looking people or portraits of people, and their limbs can look all out of place in my art.
 

MissNook

Well-Known Member
You should at least say what(s) software and hardware (in term of tablet/mouse basically) you're using if you want some help on these matters ^^
 

MissNook

Well-Known Member
Fingers, but i trace traditional art i do. When i get a new phone, I'm making sure it has a stylus for it
I've seen a video on how to create a stylus from a simple pencil for Ibis paint X. Maybe that can help you to have a somewhat better experience with your phone:

Would you be okay with talking by PM about how you draw with your software to see if I can help? I think it's easier than flooding this thread, but we can also talk here of course.
I don't have the software but I looked at tutorials about the features and it's pretty much the same as any software.
 

Bxb777

Well-Known Member
I've seen a video on how to create a stylus from a simple pencil for Ibis paint X. Maybe that can help you to have a somewhat better experience with your phone:

Would you be okay with talking by PM about how you draw with your software to see if I can help? I think it's easier than flooding this thread, but we can also talk here of course.
I don't have the software but I looked at tutorials about the features and it's pretty much the same as any software.

i like pm better ^^
 
Bump,

I'm having a lot of trouble recently on improving my art again. I really want to become a better artist but it feels like I've reached a point where I need assistance on my methods on digital art... I'm thinking about signing someone to tutor me a little bit on improving stuff
Online courses can also be very helpful, it definitely helped me a lot. I don't know if there are some for drawing on the phone, but it might be worth a look.
 

treefuddy

New Member
You've been drawing on your phone? Your tools are too limited. You can get an older Wacom Bamboo or something for under 40$
 

MissNook

Well-Known Member
You've been drawing on your phone? Your tools are too limited. You can get an older Wacom Bamboo or something for under 40$
I've seen videos on the software they use, and it's a good one, you actually have as much possibility as with a tablet. You just have to zoom a lot more to draw, that's all ^^
 
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treefuddy

New Member
I haven't used a phone for drawing like that, but, if you haven't used a proper tablet either, then I don't think either of us can wager which works better. It looks like ibis paint x supports pressure sensitivity, but I can't tell if you're actually using it from your art.

Going back through your gallery, it really stands out to me that your linework has the look of stuff done with little sketching, like you're trying to draw the 'final' lines first. There's no variation in line weight, or opacity. Basically, it looks like you're drawing with a mouse or a "tablet" that has no pressure sensitivity, with no underlying construction sketches. In the couple traditional art pieces you have up there, I can see the underlying construction is mostly larger simple shapes. This is part of the pervasive look of somewhat blobby outline-heavy focus I usually see in people who draw what they want more than drilling studies and practice. I can't tell how small you're sketching for the traditional art pieces you posted, but from the line weight, they look tiny. That can make it worse. Draw big, shrink the final product.

The tracing traditional art on your phone method sounds like the light table method, but a light table is bigger than the actual art piece so your motion isn't cramped. I'm still going to recommend the tablet for better line control given more space. Hammering out more construction and linework methods I think would pay off significantly, and you would benefit from being able to make bigger motions. A really cramped space can make the look I described worse, as well as hindering the actual experience from practicing like that.

I'm thinking about signing someone to tutor me a little bit on improving stuff
There's plenty of tutorials out there for dragging hobbyists up to intermediate levels, eg Draw-A-Box and others. Grab some textbooks too. Digital art is up there with Programming for stuff you can learn without much assistance.

You can get a medium sized tablet for ~50 or 60 bucks, put some commissions towards that before any tutors. First thing they'll tell you is to use the same tools everyone else is using.
 

Bxb777

Well-Known Member
I haven't used a phone for drawing like that, but, if you haven't used a proper tablet either, then I don't think either of us can wager which works better. It looks like ibis paint x supports pressure sensitivity, but I can't tell if you're actually using it from your art.

Going back through your gallery, it really stands out to me that your linework has the look of stuff done with little sketching, like you're trying to draw the 'final' lines first. There's no variation in line weight, or opacity. Basically, it looks like you're drawing with a mouse or a "tablet" that has no pressure sensitivity, with no underlying construction sketches. In the couple traditional art pieces you have up there, I can see the underlying construction is mostly larger simple shapes. This is part of the pervasive look of somewhat blobby outline-heavy focus I usually see in people who draw what they want more than drilling studies and practice. I can't tell how small you're sketching for the traditional art pieces you posted, but from the line weight, they look tiny. That can make it worse. Draw big, shrink the final product.

The tracing traditional art on your phone method sounds like the light table method, but a light table is bigger than the actual art piece so your motion isn't cramped. I'm still going to recommend the tablet for better line control given more space. Hammering out more construction and linework methods I think would pay off significantly, and you would benefit from being able to make bigger motions. A really cramped space can make the look I described worse, as well as hindering the actual experience from practicing like that.


There's plenty of tutorials out there for dragging hobbyists up to intermediate levels, eg Draw-A-Box and others. Grab some textbooks too. Digital art is up there with Programming for stuff you can learn without much assistance.

You can get a medium sized tablet for ~50 or 60 bucks, put some commissions towards that before any tutors. First thing they'll tell you is to use the same tools everyone else is using.

1: I have bought a drawing tablet a few years ago. I was only worked on my family PC and it broke because of my sister. The pressure broke. I prefer tablets that has a screen on it rather than having to use a computer

2: I don't even have the power to get a tablet. I have no job (trust me, no one wants to hire me) and my parents have to give me a huge questionnaire everytime I'm buying something so I can be safe. The tables I would like to use are very expensive. I know I need pressure but i have nothing where I can fix it.
 

MissNook

Well-Known Member
@treefuddy I know you want to be helpful, but the way you put it can be disheartening for the one hearing the criticism :) In my opinion, it's really good to use the sandwich criticism method (meaning putting a "negative" comment between two positive comments) to critic someone's art. And practice and studies are useful to improve, that is one of the basics, but having fun and drawing what you want is also part of the pleasure of drawing and I feel it's something easy to forget.

You said a lot of good things in my opinion so I'll just try to summary those (I hope you won't mind)
  • Doing more construction lines and on a bigger scale -> in my own opinion it helps to work on accuracy and details but it's also good to do thumbnail (draw small and sketchy version) of your final drawing to work on composition and stiffness
  • Work with line weight -> useful to show volume, to add perspective effect, to make something stand out, to work on levels of details (it's not part of all style though, but it's interesting to at least try and experiment with)
  • On traditional art, try to use bigger movement to draw -> it helps to practice accuracy and line control indeed and you won't need a tablet or anything if you practice it traditionally and it will still help with how you will draw with your phone ;)
@Bxb777 As I said before, you are on the right track with your art. You're willing to improve. You've already improved since I met you. Keep having fun and don't hesitate to experiment and take your time. <3
 

treefuddy

New Member
@treefuddy I know you want to be helpful, but-
Sandwich about sandwiches

My main point is the importance of cycling between drawing for fun and drawing for exercise.

The most challenging part is reliably scheduling time. I can't even manage that with my laundry.

1: I have bought a drawing tablet a few years ago. 2: I don't even have the power to get a tablet.

MissNook is correct that the main thing is enjoying a hobby, which means cutting BS stress. So, forget about a tablet or anything I said about a tablet, they're only a convenience. The important thing is using the same tools and setup as any book or lecture, which means having tool pressure/opacity/weight control. Consider doing more 100% traditional for awhile with pencils to focus on looser studies. The skills will transition over when you've got disposable income for a nice tablet.

Phone pics of traditional art is fine for getting critiques if you don't have a scanner. The part that will allow very specific critique is being able to see the intermediate stages, for which digital happens to be easier using layers, but you could photograph/scan stages as you go. This will allow for critique on par with paid classes.

You've got a better grasp on the underpinnings of figure drawing than I did, I really do think a bit of grind will pay off nicely.
 
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Klox

Rollling Tumbling along
Heya ! Newbie in digital drawing so my advices are to be taken with a grain of salt, but i find the critique forum so helpful and nice so i want to participate ! if youre still looking for advice :

I think you have a good idea of what you want your drawing to look like, everything is at the good place. Its a really good basis ! You just have to make it seems more "refined".

For that id say a good training is to take a bunch of pro artwork and to trace it as a sketch, as in : put sphere at the joints, cube for torso, join the different elements with rectangle-like stuff for the arm legs etc. It will help you visualize where everything in a body should be and make your art seems more alive, with places where the body "breaks" and other where its soft.

You want to present your chara in 3/4, which is a good way to make them seems less stiff ! But the proportions will be different than if they were facing front. I think you have the right idea for the body, but less so for the faces. Train by looking at artwork of faces in particular : for the eyes in a 3/4 face, the "foreground/behind" eye (sorry im not native in eng) will be different. Its outer edge will be round, not sharp.

Lastly you can play easily with shading with a simple trick : if u can do so on phone, take a large and soft brush like aerograph. Think about where the light source is. Then do a real broad and light stroke of dark paint on the body on the opposite side of the light ; and do another one in front of the light source in a bright color. It wont be perfect but then you can work on that to know where the shades are.

Lastly : check artists that youll consider better than yourself, but only slightly so, and follow them. It will help you enhance what youre already doing good while seeing where you can improve. If you look at art that are too far away from you, youll feel overwhelmed and wont know where to begin.

Most importantly : ask yourself why and how you want to improve yourself. Do you wish your art would look more like the "pro" art ? Or do you just feel constrained by your abilities and wish to do a broader range of style ? If its the second, dont bother too much with anatomy or shades and just do what you feel like. Look at art you like and reproduce it to make a pretty patchwork of your own. Not everybody should strive to become excellent, AND excellence doesnt mean beaux-arts, western museum like style. Check the art around the world and around period of time and youll see lot of it doesnt bother looking realistic and just have fun with shapes and color and looks fantastic ! Thats what art is i think, having fun and being human etc etc. I think its good to keep in mind that what "good art" is is often an eurocentric (knowing usa artist in the 19e would go to europe to 'learn' art to distance themselves from natives, i use eurocentric broadly) , or at least extremely located point of view.

Oc everythibg i said works for me, dont know for others !
 
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