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Inking

Icarus

No time like the present.
What tips are there to inking a picture?
I'm mostly afraid that i'll ruin it after i ink it because of a mistake that is irreversible from the ink.
All I've heard so far is to get a lightboard, how do those work?
 

ArrowTibbs

Probably still lives in a giant bucket
Icarus said:
What tips are there to inking a picture?
I'm mostly afraid that i'll ruin it after i ink it because of a mistake that is irreversible from the ink.
All I've heard so far is to get a lightboard, how do those work?

A lightboard basically allows you to trace a picture more easily. You would take your drawing and trace it onto another sheet of paper, with the lightboard to shine light through. You can make these yourself using plexiglass and a lamp if you want to go for that.
 

Muse

Member
Some folks use photocopies to practice inking on as well, and if you do make a mistake - depending on the final destination of the picture - folks have made good use of white out/liquid paper (or even white ink/acrylic paint) to make small corrections.

General advice: Use a pen/brush you like or are comfortable with, or at least one your familiar with. Free-form ink doodles as a way to learn and get a feel for the brush/pen is always a good idea. Unless you need a certain look (or durability) that only a certain tool will give you, you can pretty much ignore anyone's suggestions for 'such-and-such is the best thing to ink with'. I know pros who use common ball-point Bic pens, and those nasty smelling little sharpie markers to ink with, and they do great stuff because they're good with their chosen tool, not because they have magical 'artist' pens.

Make sure you're well-fed (usually 30-45 minutes) before inking if your prone to the shakes, and try your best to relax regardless of how much you like whatever you might be screwing up with ink. (Though I had an instructor that helped me get past that 'fear of destroying art' thing but making me draw until I drew something I liked a lot, and then making me deliberately screw it up/destroy it. Hard lesson, but useful, I guess - Inking has never been a 'fear' thing for me since, just tedious. :p)
 

-RyuShiramoto-

New Member
I use my Pigma Sakura Micron pens, and they work quite well.

I'd say use a bigger point for the outline

And a little bit smaller point for the other things

and then smaller for the details.

That's how I do it anyway
 

Dickie

Member
Since I draw on really cruddy paper when I use traditional media, I scan in the lines, and then after I get them all cleaned up, I print them off on the better paper fairly lightly. After that, I just go over it with my pens.

This way's not as awkward as the light board, and barring a computer crash, you won't mess up your master copy.
 

Dickie

Member
Oooh. I beg to differ. Unless you're really skilled with a tablet, inking is a bitch. I've been playing with mine for a while, and I still can't figure it out. A few of my friends have the same problem.
 

Arshes Nei

Masticates in Public
Depends, if you're looking for good line width, you can make OC work for you.

This is what I do for a brush. I put it at 3-4 pixels (use the bottom slider) Turn the top slider all the way to the left. Then turn off the Opacity. It's the 3 circles next to the Save button which looks like a diskette.

I use the scratchboard tool in Painter for inking. Lines are really nice, and you can have on the fly canvas rotation so you can turn your pic around to do better curves.

One key thing is to work larger so when it reduces it looks cleaner.
 

Muse

Member
Dickie said:
Oooh. I beg to differ. Unless you're really skilled with a tablet, inking is a bitch. I've been playing with mine for a while, and I still can't figure it out. A few of my friends have the same problem.

I think it depends on the artist and the style of inking you're going for, since I've heard it's terribly hard as well, and I've never managed it myself (sketching on the comp is sweet, but inking with it is not for me) BUT I have seen and heard of folks that do it all the time and who think it's way easier than using those 'old fashioned' pens (real media is apparently becoming suitable only for 'old men' and such now, I guess. Kids these days, I swear!)
 

Dickie

Member
I'm considering trying to a drawing totally backwards. Rather than drawing and inking traditionally, and then colouring digitally, I want to try to ink digitally, and then colour it with my pencils.

Really, only because I've never seen anyone do that before.
 

Duster

Banned
Banned
Dickie said:
I'm considering trying to a drawing totally backwards. Rather than drawing and inking traditionally, and then colouring digitally, I want to try to ink digitally, and then colour it with my pencils.

Really, only because I've never seen anyone do that before.

For a second I thought you meant color first THEN ink it, my bad

http://www.mangarevolution.com/tutorial_display.php?tutorial_id=23
 

Arshes Nei

Masticates in Public
Dickie said:
I'm considering trying to a drawing totally backwards. Rather than drawing and inking traditionally, and then colouring digitally, I want to try to ink digitally, and then colour it with my pencils.

Really, only because I've never seen anyone do that before.

It's been done actually. I'll have to find the artist.
 

BlueVon

Member
yes, u dont ever wanna use the original piece of art to ink it if ur unsure.
theres 2 ways that u can do this;

1) yes, get a light board and trace over the original piece of artwork then ink it
2) scan it in, lower the opacity to about 50% and switch the color of the lines to a blue trancing pencil, print it out then ink it.

for inks, ink pens are okay but u'll some times get rough edge lines. if u wanna go the professional rout, use india ink and a set of brushes varying in thickness.
 
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