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Lack of stigma against commissioned suits?

brian577

Active Member
I've noticed that in the cosplay community it is generally frowned upon to commission a costume, you are expected to make your own. Your not a true cosplayer if it's not homemade. In the furry community though, it doesn't matter who makes it. It's all about the performance.

Where does this dichotomy come from?
 

Kellan Meig'h

Kilted Luthier
In the beginning, many decades ago, Fursuiting was new and the suits were mainly made by the owners. As time went on, fursuit makers that were of a higher caliber began to be called upon to make suits. Lance Ikegawa comes to mind as an early suit maker. It came to be that fursuiters felt it was okay to commission a suit from someone that they felt could do a better job than they could.

Cosplayers, are a whole 'nother thing. They have this whole mentality that they will not buy a suit. Even a pre-fabbed part must be modified before it can be incorporated into a costume. I'm wondering if this has some influence from Japan, the birthplace of cosplay? What also may be fueling this self-made idiom could be the competitions for best suit from this or that anime/game/etc. I though we were bad at working to the wire to complete a costume but cosplayers take that to a new level. How about using a battery powered mini-sewing machine in the back seat of a car on the way to a cos-con?

Where we do our best and then go have fun, cosplayers get very anal about how something looks, the type of fabric, etc. Too much for me.
 

Inzoreno

The Gentleman Owl
In the beginning, many decades ago, Fursuiting was new and the suits were mainly made by the owners. As time went on, fursuit makers that were of a higher caliber began to be called upon to make suits. Lance Ikegawa comes to mind as an early suit maker. It came to be that fursuiters felt it was okay to commission a suit from someone that they felt could do a better job than they could.

Cosplayers, are a whole 'nother thing. They have this whole mentality that they will not buy a suit. Even a pre-fabbed part must be modified before it can be incorporated into a costume. I'm wondering if this has some influence from Japan, the birthplace of cosplay? What also may be fueling this self-made idiom could be the competitions for best suit from this or that anime/game/etc. I though we were bad at working to the wire to complete a costume but cosplayers take that to a new level. How about using a battery powered mini-sewing machine in the back seat of a car on the way to a cos-con?

Where we do our best and then go have fun, cosplayers get very anal about how something looks, the type of fabric, etc. Too much for me.
Actually, depending on how you define it, cosplay actually started in the United States through science fiction conventions, particularly at WorldCon.
 

Kellan Meig'h

Kilted Luthier
Actually, depending on how you define it, cosplay actually started in the United States through science fiction conventions, particularly at WorldCon.
The school of thought that I follow is Sci-Fi conventions spawned the Trekkers and other genre of costumers that revolved around American Sci-Fi. Cosplay was spawned from Anime and video game influences. There is not much crossover between Sci-Fi and Cosplay conventions that I can see, since they do have some distinct differences.

Note, these are just my $0.02 USD worth. YMMV. Only one coupon to a customer. Void where prohibited. Must be 18 to redeem prize.
 

Inzoreno

The Gentleman Owl
The school of thought that I follow is Sci-Fi conventions spawned the Trekkers and other genre of costumers that revolved around American Sci-Fi. Cosplay was spawned from Anime and video game influences. There is not much crossover between Sci-Fi and Cosplay conventions that I can see, since they do have some distinct differences.

Note, these are just my $0.02 USD worth. YMMV. Only one coupon to a customer. Void where prohibited. Must be 18 to redeem prize.
Then it's a matter of definitions, at what point does a costume cease to be cosplay and become something else?
 

Dreamerwolf

Member
I do both, cosplay and fursuiting and I am familiar with the stigma of buying a cosplay over making your own (Although there is a big movement to take that stigma away!) and you're right, it's not the same for fursuits. In my opinion, it could be because A) Being a fursuiter is more about the performance than it is the costume, whereas cosplay is often more harshly judged on how you/your costume look. (Screen accuracy and the like). So buying your cosplay is more of a 'copout', in that mentality. B) Fursuits are seen as works of art more than just costumes, and people who can't draw buy art, simple as that. There's not a stigma in commissioning artwork.
 

Kellan Meig'h

Kilted Luthier
Then it's a matter of definitions, at what point does a costume cease to be cosplay and become something else?
I think the cosplay costume becomes 'something else' when it's a free-form idea not based on an anime/video game/manga/etc. That whole judging on accuracy of the cosplay costume and how it looks/how you look is what puts it in that genre. I mean, you could do Star Trek, Star Wars, Babylon 5, Starship Troopers and that ilk but it would have to be recognizable and accurate. Just throwing together a Sci-Fi based costume doesn't cut it with Cosplayers. It's either "Yeah, he/she's recognizable as someone from XXX anime" or it's "Go Away."

As @Dreamerwolf stated, fursuiting is more about performance, not about how accurate the suit is. We don't set out to copy XXX from some whatever, our suits are typically our own creations, concept-wise. Sometimes, it's almost like a badge of honor, to have a suit made by such-and-such.

Again, just my $0.02 USD worth.
 
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