• Fur Affinity Forums are governed by Fur Affinity's Rules and Policies. Links and additional information can be accessed in the Site Information Forum.

Language furs

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
I mean, as much of a clusterfuck as English can be... it's effectively a lingua franca for business at this point and it will get you around in a fair number of places.

English is quite closely related to Scandinavian languages, so they also have an advantage learning it compared to some other nationalities.
 

Fcomega121

Friendly Maney-nix | pfp by: Skeewomp <3
I like conlangs too! Sometimes I want to try making my own but I know I would never finish it so I'm trying to fight the temptation. :) Writing systems are cool too. I know the Latin, Cyrillic and the international fingerspelling alphabet.
Ooooh neato!
I Iearned ASL alphabet also! Thanks for recslling me!

And don't worry! Conlangs are like that
You can finish them or just have them midway

Na'vi for example isn't finished but it works for the movie, but the community is helping delving the language and between everyone the language should be adapted for everyday use

In my case my conlangs are never finished but one day I want to delve one completely, or at least to be able to speak it fluently

I started learning Esperanto because I wanted to try a conlang but I stuck to it because I liked how easy and fast to learn it is. I have learned it for less than six months and I'm probably between A2 and B1 already. Also because most of the vocabulary is taken from Romance languages I have noticed I can often get the gist of written French or Italian because I recongnize so many words from Esperanto (and some from English).
I see~ esperanto is very easy! It has its twists and irregularities but it is a cool language to study

At one point I dabbled a bit in Toki Pona which is supposed to be even easier with just 120-130 words. lt is still one of the languages I hope to learn some day, along with Mandarin, Finnish Sign Languge, and getting fluent in Russian.
123 to be precise :3

That's a great goal!
I want to learn many languages as well too! :3
 

SerlisTialo

sea cucumber
i've spent too long trying to understand different languages to start experimenting with it
 

Stray Cat Terry

테리 / 特里 / テリー
Asian here! I do Chinese and Korean best, and I'm a beginner on Japanese, still gotta learn..

The history of non-alphabetical, East-Asian languages (CN, JP and KR) are all branched from ancient Chinese(漢字, 漢文), it's still obvious by the use of 漢字 (Hanzi, Kanji, Hanja) letters, while the pronunciations of individual language differ from letters to letters(and part of them are very similar or even the same!).
Modern Japanese and Korean have developed further than their initial era, but the legacy still remain--the 漢字!

If it wasn't this Hanzi branch thing.. I wouldn't have cared about what I still haven't mastered(the Japanese), but since it is related, I feel the need to master Japanese too!
 
Last edited:

Connor J. Coyote

¥otie ¥otezer
An Englishmen I worked with, who lived in Norway for years, found it difficult to pick up Norsk because everybody wanted to practice their English on him.
Hmm... I hear the Dutch do this a lot also; as several Americans (that I know) who've visited there, say they love practicing their American slang with them, all the time..... and in fact, the Dutch enjoy showing off their language skills a lot.... (especially to outsiders). It's an interesting cultural tid-bit I learned about them.... I wonder if other European places are like that also.
I mean, as much of a clusterfuck as English can be... it's effectively a lingua franca for business at this point and it will get you around in a fair number of places.
It will; English is stil the universal language for the World, (for better or worse).
 

Fcomega121

Friendly Maney-nix | pfp by: Skeewomp <3
Well that depends, as far as I understand there are some words that were part of Toki Pona's earlier version and are now optional. The exact count could change depending on if you count those.
Ooooh didn't knew! Thanks!

In that case there could be more :0
 

Dr-Meat-Roll

all meat maki
Asian here! I do Chinese and Korean best, and I'm a beginner on Japanese, still gotta learn..

The history of non-alphabetical, East-Asian languages (CN, JP and KR) are all branched from ancient Chinese(漢字, 漢文), it's still obvious by the use of 漢字 (Hanzi, Kanji, Hanja) letters, while the pronunciations of individual language differ from letters to letters(and part of them are very similar or even the same!).
Modern Japanese and Korean have developed further than their initial era, but the legacy still remain--the 漢字!

If it wasn't this Hanzi branch thing.. I wouldn't have cared about what I still haven't mastered(the Japanese), but since it is related, I feel the need to master Japanese too!
i hear all those words and i run screaming in the other direction under the concept of things i may never understand.

me simple, me dumb.
 

Pomorek

Antelope-Addicted Hyena
An Englishmen I worked with, who lived in Norway for years, found it difficult to pick up Norsk because everybody wanted to practice their English on him.
I've been in Sweden quite a bit (and heading back there once the time is right) and I can confirm, knowing English well is basically a cultural feature of the Scandinavian countries. Same thing with trying to practice the local language - if the locals learn you know English, they will want to practice it with you instead!

You can supposedly get by pretty well in Scandinavia with English. Well enough to live/work there... I dunno.
One can get by very well indeed when it comes to living, but with working, it seems to depend. For what I've seen in Sweden, unless it's a more special case - a highly sought-after specialist, or the opposite, a job so low-level that the language skill doesn't really matter - one is generally expected to know Swedish rather than not.

Hmm... I hear the Dutch do this a lot also; as several Americans (that I know) who've visited there, say they love practicing their American slang with them, all the time..... and in fact, the Dutch enjoy showing off their language skills a lot.... (especially to outsiders). It's an interesting cultural tid-bit I learned about them.... I wonder if other European places are like that also.
AFAIK, it's not so. It seems like the bigger countries (in terms of population) are much more reluctant to put pressure on foreign languages. That's my own little theory, that these smaller countries feel their prosperity depends strongly on their connection with the outside world. While the bigger ones feel more self-sufficient. And this is reflected in their approach to other languages. In any case my place, Poland, is not good when it comes to English (shopping notwithstanding, for some reason English is seen as "cool" in the world of merchandise, and half of the wares in stores have English labels). And I've been in Germany long enough to tell they're only a bit better, if at all.
 
Top