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Linux/*nix Distros you've used/rating.

iTails

Certified Asshole
So basically, you list Linux distro's you've used and rate them. Explain the pros and cons and your whole opinion on them.

Ubuntu (Versions 8.04 - 11.04)
Rating: 4/5
Pros: Great hardware support (at least in my experience), updates come frequently, and Conical Team releases a new distro about every 6 months. It's also based off Debian.
Cons: With great hardware support comes unfinished drivers or partially working drivers. At least with my hardware and experience with it. The most trouble I've had driver-wise has been with wireless support, but it just takes a little researching to fix the problem, because there's more than likely a 3rd party driver out there somewhere.
Overall: I highly recommend this distro for those wanting to get into linux and want to use it as a secondary or primary OS on their machine.

Linux Mint (9 - 10 Beta - 10 )
Rating: 3/5
Pros: Another distro based off Debian with a more Windows-like feel for your desktop, so Windows users coming over to Linux can easily understand the interface. It's similar to Ubuntu, but different design-wise. Linux Mint 10 is 10 times better than Linux Mint 9.
Cons: For version 9, I had some serious hardware issues for my netbook's (Acer Aspire D250) integrated GPU where it would lock up constantly if I did anything even remotely resource intense, such as watching Youtube videos or a flash website.
Overall: I would only recommend this as a learning experience for basic linux and Windows users coming to Linux.

Debian (Base):
Rating: 4/5
Pros: Very nice Distro for more advanced users. The only thing you really need to do is get all of your drivers in order for it to work and maybe some additional software to tweak it to your liking.
Cons: Hardware support is based on your knowledge, no integrated hardware support.
Overall: I use this as a server OS. Very flexible and very smooth in the way it operates if you want something basic that you can customize easily.

Gentoo:
Rating: 2/5
Pros: Customize it ANY way you want.
Cons: This is for way advanced users to use. It's hard in the beginning, but once you start reading up on some software and installation guides, it becomes a lot, lot easier. DO RESEARCH BEFORE EVEN ATTEMPTING TO INSTALL.
Overall: I do not recommend this as a desktop OS. It's more of a complicated toy.

Arch Linux:
Rating: 3/5
Pros: Customize it any way you want. Similar to Gentoo, except less of a hassle to install. You still need to know things, read installation guides.
Cons: Hardware support is limited and varies depending on how frequently said hardware is used. For example, if I have a wireless adapter that's not supported in most prebuilt PC's or on the market, there will be little to no drivers.
Overall: Good distro, fun to play with.

Fedora:
Rating: 4/5
Pros: Very nice, very clean, and it's a great server OS. I used this before I used Debian. Nice hardware support and updates are frequently coming out.
Cons: Not necessarily a home-use play on the internet kind of distro.
Overall: Recommended for beginners server distro

Elementary:
Rating: 4/5
Pros: Very clean and neat looking. More for internet use than practical computing use. It's based off Debian and a lot of the updates for it are copied from Ubuntu.
Cons: Still a young distro. Some bugs here and there, but it's getting better.
Overall: I'd recommend this as a desktop/netbook OS.

Damn Small Linux (DSL):
Rating: 3/5
Pros: VERY light, fast, and can be thrown on a USB and booted from it easily.
Cons: Don't expect anything extravagant from it. It's there for older computers, or in my case, I use it when I don't want to use Windows at my college.
Overall: Not recommended for daily use.
 

Runefox

Kitsune of the PC Master Race
Any RPM-based distro:
Rating: 2/5
Pros: Passable.
Cons: RPM. Enjoy dependency hell.
 

Tissemand

Random furfag
Gentoo:
Rating: 2/5
Pros: Customize it ANY way you want.
Cons: This is for way advanced users to use. It's hard in the beginning, but once you start reading up on some software and installation guides, it becomes a lot, lot easier. DO RESEARCH BEFORE EVEN ATTEMPTING TO INSTALL.
Overall: I do not recommend this as a desktop OS. It's more of a complicated toy.
Lol'd.

Anyways... Ubuntu:
Rating: 4/5.
Pros: Everything tends to work out-of-box, and most utilities on Ubuntu have a GUI (and there are also cli alternatives). Uses the apt packaging system. HUGE community! Easy installation.
Cons: Feels a bit bloated and slow, especially on older systems. *I think* non-free repository is automatically in sources (this could also be a pro). Sadly, 11.10 uses GNOME3 and Unity.

GNU/Debian:
Rating: 4/5
Pros: Very customizable! You can have it suited for a server, laptop, desktop, etc; I've ran Debian on ARM, x86, and x86_64. Almost 100% free like freedom although there is a non-free repository available (but not used automatically). HUGE packaging repository and there are utilities (like apt-src) to easily compile from source. Pretty big and old community available too.
Cons: Slow releases, package manager seems to have old packages. I can't marry it.

Fedora:
Rating: 3/5
Pros: Very stable and has a clean interface. Easy to install too. Decent sized community.
Cons: I hate yum. :/

All other distros I haven't used enough to rate them.
 
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