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Critique: Looking for citique

treefuddy

New Member
I can outline the next year or two

There's some progression from your earlier stuff in actual lines, etc, and it looks like you've got some basic construction and references going on. But the symbology drawing and fundamentals such as perspective and construction are looking undeveloped.

Skip doing NSFW or any kind of "finished" product, do and post actual exercises and studies

1) Symbol drawing, aka you're drawing ideas of objects but not real objects, like how a save icon is just a symbol of a floppy disk. You need to divide between an idea of an object, and actually rendering a real object. The jarring disconnect between the kind of rendered torsos (construction and references to real things that exist) and their heads (fantasy heads that have no real world reference) really illustrates this, where the former is a bit more consistent looking in the fundamentals than the latter.
  • Forget "cartoon" or "anime" kinds of "styles", they're all derivative of reality. The hidden step to actually getting anywhere with good cartooning is a solid grasp of drawing the real. After that, you intentionally distill specific aspects of the object to "stylize" it into a "cartoon".
  • Forget outlines completely for awhile, they don't really exist.
  • Do some scribble sketches to loosen up, don't try to render outlines with these, rapidly and chaotically fill volume like you've got parkinsons and are trying to imitate a robotic arm printing a fuzzy photograph. Consider volume, shape, relations, positive space, negative space, and value (to a rougher degree).
  • Do some greyscale paintings, do a bit of object rendering with just a pressure sensitive brush, doesn't have to be accurate, just has to be messy and fluid and convey concepts of 3D geometry in 3D space
  • Do actual object studies, and they don't even have to be consistent in style or focus
2) Once you've started to separate the concepts of symbols and representing real objects, then you can actually drill some fundamentals.
  • The first rule of drawing: Consistency across a piece. This is everything from effort and time and focus, to styles and themes, to the ever important underlying construction. AKA Don't draw a really nice nose and put a couple half assed eyes with it that aren't even quite placed right in relation to it.
  • Do anatomy studies, two kinds: Specific features (EG hands, feet, legs, arms, etc), and whole figures, but keep in mind the previous point AKA don't have a really nice big toe and some half assed little toes stuck on not quite right
  • Drill specific fundamentals, these things have actual exercises. Perspective, line work, etc. There's a list of them in every art textbook.
  • Start combining fundamentals into studies while trying to keep the consistency rule in mind
3) Coming back to drawing things you actually want to draw
  • Do so for awhile, then go back to step #2 for awhile
  • Repeat ad-naseum
 

TempestValiant

New Member
I can outline the next year or two

There's some progression from your earlier stuff in actual lines, etc, and it looks like you've got some basic construction and references going on. But the symbology drawing and fundamentals such as perspective and construction are looking undeveloped.

Skip doing NSFW or any kind of "finished" product, do and post actual exercises and studies

1) Symbol drawing, aka you're drawing ideas of objects but not real objects, like how a save icon is just a symbol of a floppy disk. You need to divide between an idea of an object, and actually rendering a real object. The jarring disconnect between the kind of rendered torsos (construction and references to real things that exist) and their heads (fantasy heads that have no real world reference) really illustrates this, where the former is a bit more consistent looking in the fundamentals than the latter.
  • Forget "cartoon" or "anime" kinds of "styles", they're all derivative of reality. The hidden step to actually getting anywhere with good cartooning is a solid grasp of drawing the real. After that, you intentionally distill specific aspects of the object to "stylize" it into a "cartoon".
  • Forget outlines completely for awhile, they don't really exist.
  • Do some scribble sketches to loosen up, don't try to render outlines with these, rapidly and chaotically fill volume like you've got parkinsons and are trying to imitate a robotic arm printing a fuzzy photograph. Consider volume, shape, relations, positive space, negative space, and value (to a rougher degree).
  • Do some greyscale paintings, do a bit of object rendering with just a pressure sensitive brush, doesn't have to be accurate, just has to be messy and fluid and convey concepts of 3D geometry in 3D space
  • Do actual object studies, and they don't even have to be consistent in style or focus
2) Once you've started to separate the concepts of symbols and representing real objects, then you can actually drill some fundamentals.
  • The first rule of drawing: Consistency across a piece. This is everything from effort and time and focus, to styles and themes, to the ever important underlying construction. AKA Don't draw a really nice nose and put a couple half assed eyes with it that aren't even quite placed right in relation to it.
  • Do anatomy studies, two kinds: Specific features (EG hands, feet, legs, arms, etc), and whole figures, but keep in mind the previous point AKA don't have a really nice big toe and some half assed little toes stuck on not quite right
  • Drill specific fundamentals, these things have actual exercises. Perspective, line work, etc. There's a list of them in every art textbook.
  • Start combining fundamentals into studies while trying to keep the consistency rule in mind
3) Coming back to drawing things you actually want to draw
  • Do so for awhile, then go back to step #2 for awhile
  • Repeat ad-naseum
Thank you for the advice! This is really helpful!
 
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