• Fur Affinity Forums are governed by Fur Affinity's Rules and Policies. Links and additional information can be accessed in the Site Information Forum.

Looking for Critique

princesstool

New Member
Hey the title makes this pretty self explanatory. If you feel like giving me advice/critique go for it! I never really like doing this because I'm pretty insecure about hearing critique about my art that I'm already aware of but I need to get over that and out myself out there more for suggestion on how to get better. I watch so many speedpaints and look up tutorials but I feel like I don't quite retain that information very well or I just don't have the skill set to produce the same results. I feel like I have lazy artist syndrome and instead of taking my art a step further like I should I just stop and post something underwhelming because I just don't have the energy. But anyway enough excuses! Here is some of my work. For more visit my art blog here.

KXGhpOm.jpg


FJ1UFoQ.jpg
xZCSfGO.png
 

LadyFromEast

Traditional Artist, Architect
Hi there, Princesstool!

From what I see in your art, it's really nice and you're not afraid of practicing different poses - which is a very good thing to begin with. Sticking to only one or two poses you've already mastered hinders you, so don't be afraid to try different ones. If you fail - that's ok, the next time you'll do better and so on, and so on!
When it comes to the frist image, most of my attentions was drawn to the fact the lineart merges into the artwork in quite few places, making it look a bit sloppy. Maybe try doing your linearts in another layer altogether? That is, provided it was not the effect you strived for - if that's the case, my opinion is irrelevant here. What I do love there is the colours, the cute faces and the poses of your creatures. They are so adorable and squishy I almost want one at my house!
Moving on to the picture of wolves and the eagle, I think it lacks some depth. Try using some other colours while shading - don't limit yourself only to black, grey and white. Experiment with different colouring. If you look at real life examples, shadows are often blue, pink, even purple or yellow. The same goes for lights - the spectrum of colours it can assume is astounding, if you have blue lighting don't hesitate to add blue-ish reflexes to whatever you're drawing and shading. Also, mix colour paletter and the colours with one another. Brown has but one colour, the palette of browns you can do is limited only by your imagination. Add multiple tones to your creatures. They will become more lifelike.
If a grey creature stands next to white one, it will reflect some light to the latter and it will have some grey reflexes too. If a blue bird sits next to a yellow one, the first will have some blue reflexes, the latter will have some yellow. Animals and whatever creatures you might come up with aren't just one colour. The light is not only limited to white, and the shadow is not only limited to gray and black. Try using no black and white at all as an exercise, the results may be amazing and surprising! Just as you did with the eagle's head - that's the effect you want to strive for on the rest od the creature. I also love the composition here, although you might be interested in letting the image breathe a bit by adding some space on its lowest part. As it is now, the whole pack and the bird are ready to jump out from the frame, which is both good - it adds dynamism to the composition - and a bit bad - it makes it unstable, unnerving.
As for the third artwork - I can't really say much. It's simple, clean and beautiful. The expression and pose is lovely, and the eyes are captivating. I love how you shaded them, and how you did the ears.
I'm also very fond of your watermark. It's simple, it looks good and merges into the drawing, becomes a part of it and is in harmony with whatever is portrayed on the artwork. What I might suggest is perhaps making it a but smaller next time, but that's just my own feeling.

Lastly, and most importantly - there's no need to fear or feel anxious about critique. Remember that it's someone's opinion - and opinions differ from person to person. If someone disagrees with you it doesn't mean they're ultimately right or wrong, and you're in the opposite. They just share their opinion on the matter, and since they do not reside in your head, they often do not know what you intended to portray and how. There may be cases when someone mistakes a wanted effect for a mistake or flaw, but don't let that discourage you for the reasons mentioned above.
Critique lets you look at your piece from many more points of view. Art is what appears when a person views and feels the piece. It's personal and subjective, and critiques, while they may be written as objective as a person is able, are still subjective, personal to the commenter to some point.
You can agree or disagree with any critique. If you do it doesn't mean you can't take or accept critique, it just means your opinion is different. and everyone is entitled to have their own opinion :)

Good luck!
 

princesstool

New Member
Hi there, Princesstool!

From what I see in your art, it's really nice and you're not afraid of practicing different poses - which is a very good thing to begin with. Sticking to only one or two poses you've already mastered hinders you, so don't be afraid to try different ones. If you fail - that's ok, the next time you'll do better and so on, and so on!
When it comes to the frist image, most of my attentions was drawn to the fact the lineart merges into the artwork in quite few places, making it look a bit sloppy. Maybe try doing your linearts in another layer altogether? That is, provided it was not the effect you strived for - if that's the case, my opinion is irrelevant here. What I do love there is the colours, the cute faces and the poses of your creatures. They are so adorable and squishy I almost want one at my house!
Moving on to the picture of wolves and the eagle, I think it lacks some depth. Try using some other colours while shading - don't limit yourself only to black, grey and white. Experiment with different colouring. If you look at real life examples, shadows are often blue, pink, even purple or yellow. The same goes for lights - the spectrum of colours it can assume is astounding, if you have blue lighting don't hesitate to add blue-ish reflexes to whatever you're drawing and shading. Also, mix colour paletter and the colours with one another. Brown has but one colour, the palette of browns you can do is limited only by your imagination. Add multiple tones to your creatures. They will become more lifelike.
If a grey creature stands next to white one, it will reflect some light to the latter and it will have some grey reflexes too. If a blue bird sits next to a yellow one, the first will have some blue reflexes, the latter will have some yellow. Animals and whatever creatures you might come up with aren't just one colour. The light is not only limited to white, and the shadow is not only limited to gray and black. Try using no black and white at all as an exercise, the results may be amazing and surprising! Just as you did with the eagle's head - that's the effect you want to strive for on the rest od the creature. I also love the composition here, although you might be interested in letting the image breathe a bit by adding some space on its lowest part. As it is now, the whole pack and the bird are ready to jump out from the frame, which is both good - it adds dynamism to the composition - and a bit bad - it makes it unstable, unnerving.
As for the third artwork - I can't really say much. It's simple, clean and beautiful. The expression and pose is lovely, and the eyes are captivating. I love how you shaded them, and how you did the ears.
I'm also very fond of your watermark. It's simple, it looks good and merges into the drawing, becomes a part of it and is in harmony with whatever is portrayed on the artwork. What I might suggest is perhaps making it a but smaller next time, but that's just my own feeling.

Lastly, and most importantly - there's no need to fear or feel anxious about critique. Remember that it's someone's opinion - and opinions differ from person to person. If someone disagrees with you it doesn't mean they're ultimately right or wrong, and you're in the opposite. They just share their opinion on the matter, and since they do not reside in your head, they often do not know what you intended to portray and how. There may be cases when someone mistakes a wanted effect for a mistake or flaw, but don't let that discourage you for the reasons mentioned above.
Critique lets you look at your piece from many more points of view. Art is what appears when a person views and feels the piece. It's personal and subjective, and critiques, while they may be written as objective as a person is able, are still subjective, personal to the commenter to some point.
You can agree or disagree with any critique. If you do it doesn't mean you can't take or accept critique, it just means your opinion is different. and everyone is entitled to have their own opinion :)

Good luck!
Thank you that was all very helpful. I look forward to getting more feedback like this.
 
Top