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Critique: Looking for some critique

SheeraArt

Well-Known Member

treefuddy

New Member
Not going to bother with NSFW content

1) Shading looks like the old burn tool method, producing a "spray can shading" look. Or you're using a large size soft brush with what kind of looks like a fixed opacity. This has applications, but the problem is the gradient at the edge of the tool doesn't really represent anything that exists. Unless it's a round ball with one light source. With cell shading, the edges of the shading are intentionally defining the local geometry of the object, but how many values you're using is simplified across the canvas. With more traditional art, no shading has perfectly clean edges but still defines the underlying geometry both at the zoomed out (relative to everything on the canvas) and zoomed in (relative to it's neighbors) scales.

The shading you have gives some detail zoomed out, but locally belongs to a round ball since the edge of the tool leaves a perfect gradient, and across the piece has simplified values. Basically, there's very little information conveyed aside from "rough areas" being shaded where there should be shading.

I'd try some different shading styles from various tutorials. Given the animation looking style, you probably want cell shading. Try to establish the minimum and maximum values before filling in the piece, and if it's cell shading then give yourself a pallet of fixed values on hand to reference.

2) Anatomy is all about drilling studies of real things at a much higher level than you actually use in finished cartoon pieces. For that, it's hard to beat traditional sketching.
 

SheeraArt

Well-Known Member
Not going to bother with NSFW content

1) Shading looks like the old burn tool method, producing a "spray can shading" look. Or you're using a large size soft brush with what kind of looks like a fixed opacity. This has applications, but the problem is the gradient at the edge of the tool doesn't really represent anything that exists. Unless it's a round ball with one light source. With cell shading, the edges of the shading are intentionally defining the local geometry of the object, but how many values you're using is simplified across the canvas. With more traditional art, no shading has perfectly clean edges but still defines the underlying geometry both at the zoomed out (relative to everything on the canvas) and zoomed in (relative to it's neighbors) scales.

The shading you have gives some detail zoomed out, but locally belongs to a round ball since the edge of the tool leaves a perfect gradient, and across the piece has simplified values. Basically, there's very little information conveyed aside from "rough areas" being shaded where there should be shading.

I'd try some different shading styles from various tutorials. Given the animation looking style, you probably want cell shading. Try to establish the minimum and maximum values before filling in the piece, and if it's cell shading then give yourself a pallet of fixed values on hand to reference.

2) Anatomy is all about drilling studies of real things at a much higher level than you actually use in finished cartoon pieces. For that, it's hard to beat traditional sketching.
Thanks for your critique^^ You are right, i used a spray tool for shading. Cell shading might be a good advice for me.
 
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Vinfang

Indie Game Artist / Telegram: vinfang
study anatomy and other basics. be mindful of line weights and make use of pointy edges.
too much feathery disrupt outlines and makes it hard to read the drawing. good designs have good silhouette.
copy and paste is rigid and broke perspectives, if you have a character with many toes/tails, don't be lazy in drawing them.
as for shading, try a stiffer bush, avoid air-brushing. you can use a blur filer to soften the edges and make adjustments with overlay.
 

Olivitree

Local Bizartist
Fastest way to improve for you I think would be drawing from life, photos (I don't mean tracing, you need to train your hand and brain to understand the world in forms, shapes and shadows with out just drawing over something, that'll only train your hand)
Really LOOK at stuff, look at the shapes the shadows make, the negative space (where the background shows through behind and arm, etc) look how things look heavy, weighted or how they interact with the objects around them.
Squint your eyes while looking at things too, so you can draw them as basic shapes and light and shadow, then look normally to add the details and such.

For anatomy, again, references! you need to fill your visual library in your brain with what things look like, we think we know what something looks like but we don't really know unless we are looking at it, to begin with anyway, eventually you'll build up your visual library and strengthen it to the point you can just pull stuff out of your head and put it to paper.

Practice is the way forward, and learning from life before you start stylising.

Here's some helpful videos from some favourite artists of mine!
Good explaination on how to use references.

Anatomy wizard! For human anatomy, but the processes and anatomy can easily be translated to anthro.

Lost Drawing Tips (short snippets from episodes) - YouTube useful tips.
 
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