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Medieval - Pre WW2 History Thread

Ennui Elemental

Eat shit and die, tankie assholes
Banned
Does Russia actually have a higher incidence of meteorite strikes and bolides or do they just happen to get the more memorable events?
 

ben909

vaporeon character is busy so coffee mushroom now
Does Russia actually have a higher incidence of meteorite strikes and bolides or do they just happen to get the more memorable events?
lot of land, bigger target
 

Minerva_Minx

Sheogorath is my co-pilot
About ~3500-4000 years ago, a lower airburst destroyed several village during the Bronze Age in the Middle East. The impact of space debris on civilization is pretty awesome.

Does Russia actually have a higher incidence of meteorite strikes and bolides or do they just happen to get the more memorable events?
Siberia is a pretty big landmass. Australia and the US used to take pretty good impacts at one point pre-Ice Age. Think South Africa was number 2 size.

Pacific Ocean is still routinely hit.

As far as percentage, based on land, no appreciable difference.
 

Ennui Elemental

Eat shit and die, tankie assholes
Banned
Wonder if there's any way to track the incidence of past ocean splashdowns or bolides that occur over water. Probably not, barring old sailor's logs and dredging the bottom of the oceans like the Pacific to look for unusual concentrations of nickel/iron/etc that can't be easily explained otherwise.
 

ben909

vaporeon character is busy so coffee mushroom now
Wonder if there's any way to track the incidence of past ocean splashdowns or bolides that occur over water. Probably not, barring old sailor's logs and dredging the bottom of the oceans like the Pacific to look for unusual concentrations of nickel/iron/etc that can't be easily explained otherwise.
iron deposits on the ocean floor could be natural
 

The_biscuits_532

Eternally Confused Feline
Tsangyang Gyatso, the Sixth Dalai Lama (1683-1706):

- Born to a Monpa family in Arunchal Pradesh, India (or rather, the the territory that would become it)
- Had a severe infection in his early childhood. Following his recovery, his family thought he was protected by the heavens
- Discovered by the monks at age 16
- Really didn't vibe with their rules, Often stayed out late drinking, sleeping with prostitutes and singing
- Apparently was pretty great at music. Especially love songs.
- Kidnapped in 1706 by the Qing administration, and deposed in favour of Ngawang Yeshey Gyatso.
- This was not recognised by the Tibetans, although Ngawang Yeshey is considered an incarnation of the Buddhist avatar of Compassion, Avalokitesvara.
- Disappeared suddenly whilst being taken through the Qinghai region.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
iron deposits on the ocean floor could be natural

You're right; sea-floor transition metal deposits such as 'magnanese nodules' are actually very common.

I was going to mention 'shocked quartz' or micro-diamond, but @Minerva_Minx is on the ball already! ;D
Rare 'siderophile' elements such as Iridium, can also be an indicators for asteroids. These elements aren't present at high concentrations at Earth's surface because they tended to dissolve into the metal-phase during core formation.
 

Yastreb

Well-Known Member
Don't you only get shock metamorphism when the asteroid hits solid ground at high velocity? With ocean impacts the object would have to be something like a kilometer across to get to the ocean floor without disintegrating and losing its energy long before.

About ~3500-4000 years ago, a lower airburst destroyed several village during the Bronze Age in the Middle East. The impact of space debris on civilization is pretty awesome.
This event is heavily disputed.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
Don't you only get shock metamorphism when the asteroid hits solid ground at high velocity? With ocean impacts the object would have to be something like a kilometer across to get to the ocean floor without disintegrating and losing its energy long before.

Sounds like a reasonable idea. I don't know how much geology is done on marine craters outside of shallow continental shelf settings anyway. Ocean crust tends to be recycled relatively rapidly on geological time-scales, so what are the chances that any piece of ocean crust has been around long enough to be hit by a massive enough impactor to leave a mark?

I checked wikipedia for curiosity, all of the confirmed impact craters are continental or shallow continental shelf:

and of the 'possible' impact craters, only 1 is unambiguously deep-sea, but it isn't a confirmed impact and it is suspiciously near a mid-oceanic ridge.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
Portraits of Ogedi Khan, the son of Gengis Khan, show he may have had red hair.
YuanEmperorAlbumOgedeiPortrait.jpg


Also, recently L'anse aux Meadows was in the news, after dendrochronology appears to date the exact time of Viking activity to around 1021 AD.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
The 'Horseshoe arch' famous in Moorish architecture, may have in fact originated with the Visigoths.

The Arab name for Spain 'Al-Andalus' may refer to Spain's previous invasion by the Vandals.

The introduction of the Arabic oud in Spain caused extra strings to be widely adopted in European guitars, and a new style of playing that would ultimately lead to modern guitar styles.
 

Frank Gulotta

Send us your floppy
Not sure where or how to put this. But Japanese music is unique in its ability to take very old melodies and adapt them to contemporary genres, it's a culture that's so consistent, it's able to transcend time
Here's a melody from (i think) the 16th century, in beach rock style
 

Punji

Daedric Prince of Secrets
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
I found this today.
Volcanic ash layers can be dated, and evidence of the presence of livestock exists on the Faroe Islands beneath ash layers pre-dating the commonly accepted date for Viking expansion.
So it is possible people from mainland Britain or Ireland had reached the Faroes in 500 AD, hundreds of years before the Norse.

Typically Y-chromosomes in the Faroe islands indicate Scandinavian ancestry while Mitochondrial DNA indicates British and Irish origins.
This has usually been interpreted as evidence that Viking settlers brought British and Irish women with them.

However, if British and Irish settlers had arrived hundreds of years before Norse settlers, that is an alternative explanation for mixed ancestry, especially since Y-chromosomes can change very rapidly in a population even if the overall ancestry isn't changing much.
 

Nexus Cabler

Conduit of Synergy
Contrary to today's teachings, Luis Ladimer is not the father of the electric lights, nor is Edison. The first electric illumination devices date back to 1802

Sir Humphry Davy, an English physician, created the first electric light by passing a current through a platinum strip. The glow did not last long, but it marked the beginning of the history with light bulbs. In 1809, Davy demonstrated the first carbon arc lamp at the Royal Institute in London by connecting two wires to a battery and attaching a charcoal strip between the other ends of the wires.

A massive improvement followed through with the work of Pavel Nikolayevich Yablochkov, a Russian electrician, who developed the first practical arc lamp known as the "Yablochkov Candle." Yablochkov used two parallel carbon rods to extend the life of the battery. During the Paris World's Fair of 1878, about 64 Yablochkov candles were installed on the Avenue de l'Opéra, Plade du Théâtre Francais and around the Place de l'Opéra, earning the city the famous nickname of "City of Lights." The success of the exhibition was influential in bringing electric lighting to the masses, and arc lamps were soon installed on many streets in the United States and Europe.

These two individuals work would pave the way for the later improvements.
 

Yastreb

Well-Known Member
Contrary to today's teachings, Luis Ladimer is not the father of the electric lights, nor is Edison. The first electric illumination devices date back to 1802

Sir Humphry Davy, an English physician, created the first electric light by passing a current through a platinum strip. The glow did not last long, but it marked the beginning of the history with light bulbs. In 1809, Davy demonstrated the first carbon arc lamp at the Royal Institute in London by connecting two wires to a battery and attaching a charcoal strip between the other ends of the wires.

A massive improvement followed through with the work of Pavel Nikolayevich Yablochkov, a Russian electrician, who developed the first practical arc lamp known as the "Yablochkov Candle." Yablochkov used two parallel carbon rods to extend the life of the battery. During the Paris World's Fair of 1878, about 64 Yablochkov candles were installed on the Avenue de l'Opéra, Plade du Théâtre Francais and around the Place de l'Opéra, earning the city the famous nickname of "City of Lights." The success of the exhibition was influential in bringing electric lighting to the masses, and arc lamps were soon installed on many streets in the United States and Europe.

These two individuals work would pave the way for the later improvements.
Edison introduced the first commercially successful incandescent light bulbs, but he definitely didn't invent electric lights or anything like that. I thought this was common knowledge!
 

The_biscuits_532

Eternally Confused Feline
O shit just realised I haven't spoke about the Inca Empire here yet

- Preceded by two large empires - the Tiwanaku (600-1000), and the Wari (600-1100)

- Founded in 1438 by Pachakutiq - whose name means something along the lines of "He who shakes the earth" or "he who overturns space and time", both of which are badass

- Casting my mind back to Horrible Histories, Pachakutiq had a thing for turning people intos carecrows, and their arms into flutes

- Machu Pichu, the most famous Inca ruin, was Pachakutiq's personal estate.

- Used a flag almost identical to the gay pride flag, which is still the flag of their capital, Qusqu/ Cuzco

- At its peak, possibly the largest nation in the western Hemisphere, by area. They had a population of 10 million at their peak

- Primary culture was Quechua, although the Quechua only comprised a tenth of the empire. The Quechua name for the empire was Tawantisuyu, the Four Realms, in reference to the four states it was divided into. "Inca" translated to "lord".

- The four states were Chinchasuyu (NW), Antisuyu (NE), Kuntisuyu (SW) and Qullasuyu (SE)

- Somehow managed everything without inventing metal tools, the wheel, or the domestication of mountable animals

- Hell, they didn't even have writing. They used Quipu Knots to record information

- No concept of commerce, used a barter system for their economy

- The state religion, Inti, was literally just "praise the sun".

- Okay it was a bit more involved than that. Viracocha created the universe, they did human sacrifice, reincarnation was a thing

-They had this weird practise of forcing children's heads to grow into strange shapes. This was used to physically differentiate the upper and lower classes

- Developed basic refrigeration technology - Chuño was a food made by freezing potatoes at high altitudes

- Oh yeah, all their infrastructure was built on the top of the second largest mountain range on the planet. Again, without wheels or mountable animals.

- They did however, domestic Llamas, Alpaca, and Guinea Pigs

- Francisco Pizarro arrived in the empire in 1526 on recon, and returned 6 years later with intentions of conquest. However, it was a lot easier than anticipated - he arrived to find the empire in disarray.

- The death of Sapa Inca Huayna Capac from smallpox, as well as his primary heir, had led to his two younger sons, Atahualpa and Huascar, fighting in a civil war.

- The Inca obviously had a massive technological disadvantage, still being barely on the cusp of the bronze age, but Pizarre only had around 170 soldiers with him, and it wasn't exactly a case like the Aztecs; the Inca weren't brutal tyrants that the Spanish could inspire a revolution against. That being said, many of the other native groups really didn't mind the change in authority.

- The Spanish did fight them a few times beforehand, but they tried to approach Atahualpa to convert him to Catholicism, and demand his fealty to King Charles of Spain. He declined, and they kidnapped him. He paid the ransom of an entire cell's worth of gold, but they refused to release him.

- Meanwhile they also assassinated Huascar, and pinned the blame on Atahualpa, using it as an excuse to execute him.

- A third brother Manco Inca Yupanqui, was installed by the Spanish as a puppet king for some time, but following increasing encroachment by the spanish, he established the Neo-Incan Empire in Vilcabamba, in 1537.

- The Neo-Incan Empire was able to resist annexation for nearly another 40 years, until the Spanish finally deposed Túpac Amaru in 1572.

- There was a number of attempts to revive the empire all the way until Peru's independence, such as under Juan Santos Atahualpa, or Túpac Amaru II.

- Many of the former citizens in the empire were enslaved in mines by the spanish, if they survived both the smallpox and the conquest.

- Gender obviously wasn't the same as in Western concepts, pre contact. All children were considered "Rutuchikuy", between reaching an age of self-sufficiency (Newborns were "Wawa" and weren't given much societal investment due to the obvious mortality rates in a pre-industrial society). At the onset of puberty a celebration would be held, and they would be declared "Warachikuy" (Men) or "Qikuchikuy" (Women). Any that reached the age of 90 would be "Ruku"

- Gender roles in adulthood had some overlap but the society was mostly patriarchal. Interestingly though, inheritance followed gender lines. Men would inherit all of their father's wealth, and women all their mother's.
 
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