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Medieval - Pre WW2 History Thread

Ennui Elemental

Well-Known Member
Does Russia actually have a higher incidence of meteorite strikes and bolides or do they just happen to get the more memorable events?
 

ben909

vaporeon
Does Russia actually have a higher incidence of meteorite strikes and bolides or do they just happen to get the more memorable events?
lot of land, bigger target
 

Minerva_Minx

Sheogorath is my co-pilot
About ~3500-4000 years ago, a lower airburst destroyed several village during the Bronze Age in the Middle East. The impact of space debris on civilization is pretty awesome.

Does Russia actually have a higher incidence of meteorite strikes and bolides or do they just happen to get the more memorable events?
Siberia is a pretty big landmass. Australia and the US used to take pretty good impacts at one point pre-Ice Age. Think South Africa was number 2 size.

Pacific Ocean is still routinely hit.

As far as percentage, based on land, no appreciable difference.
 

Ennui Elemental

Well-Known Member
Wonder if there's any way to track the incidence of past ocean splashdowns or bolides that occur over water. Probably not, barring old sailor's logs and dredging the bottom of the oceans like the Pacific to look for unusual concentrations of nickel/iron/etc that can't be easily explained otherwise.
 

ben909

vaporeon
Wonder if there's any way to track the incidence of past ocean splashdowns or bolides that occur over water. Probably not, barring old sailor's logs and dredging the bottom of the oceans like the Pacific to look for unusual concentrations of nickel/iron/etc that can't be easily explained otherwise.
iron deposits on the ocean floor could be natural
 

The_biscuits_532

Eternally Confused Feline
Tsangyang Gyatso, the Sixth Dalai Lama (1683-1706):

- Born to a Monpa family in Arunchal Pradesh, India (or rather, the the territory that would become it)
- Had a severe infection in his early childhood. Following his recovery, his family thought he was protected by the heavens
- Discovered by the monks at age 16
- Really didn't vibe with their rules, Often stayed out late drinking, sleeping with prostitutes and singing
- Apparently was pretty great at music. Especially love songs.
- Kidnapped in 1706 by the Qing administration, and deposed in favour of Ngawang Yeshey Gyatso.
- This was not recognised by the Tibetans, although Ngawang Yeshey is considered an incarnation of the Buddhist avatar of Compassion, Avalokitesvara.
- Disappeared suddenly whilst being taken through the Qinghai region.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
iron deposits on the ocean floor could be natural

You're right; sea-floor transition metal deposits such as 'magnanese nodules' are actually very common.

I was going to mention 'shocked quartz' or micro-diamond, but @Minerva_Minx is on the ball already! ;D
Rare 'siderophile' elements such as Iridium, can also be an indicators for asteroids. These elements aren't present at high concentrations at Earth's surface because they tended to dissolve into the metal-phase during core formation.
 

Yastreb

Well-Known Member
Don't you only get shock metamorphism when the asteroid hits solid ground at high velocity? With ocean impacts the object would have to be something like a kilometer across to get to the ocean floor without disintegrating and losing its energy long before.

About ~3500-4000 years ago, a lower airburst destroyed several village during the Bronze Age in the Middle East. The impact of space debris on civilization is pretty awesome.
This event is heavily disputed.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
Don't you only get shock metamorphism when the asteroid hits solid ground at high velocity? With ocean impacts the object would have to be something like a kilometer across to get to the ocean floor without disintegrating and losing its energy long before.

Sounds like a reasonable idea. I don't know how much geology is done on marine craters outside of shallow continental shelf settings anyway. Ocean crust tends to be recycled relatively rapidly on geological time-scales, so what are the chances that any piece of ocean crust has been around long enough to be hit by a massive enough impactor to leave a mark?

I checked wikipedia for curiosity, all of the confirmed impact craters are continental or shallow continental shelf:

and of the 'possible' impact craters, only 1 is unambiguously deep-sea, but it isn't a confirmed impact and it is suspiciously near a mid-oceanic ridge.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
Portraits of Ogedi Khan, the son of Gengis Khan, show he may have had red hair.
YuanEmperorAlbumOgedeiPortrait.jpg


Also, recently L'anse aux Meadows was in the news, after dendrochronology appears to date the exact time of Viking activity to around 1021 AD.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
The 'Horseshoe arch' famous in Moorish architecture, may have in fact originated with the Visigoths.

The Arab name for Spain 'Al-Andalus' may refer to Spain's previous invasion by the Vandals.

The introduction of the Arabic oud in Spain caused extra strings to be widely adopted in European guitars, and a new style of playing that would ultimately lead to modern guitar styles.
 

Frank Gulotta

Send us your floppy
Not sure where or how to put this. But Japanese music is unique in its ability to take very old melodies and adapt them to contemporary genres, it's a culture that's so consistent, it's able to transcend time
Here's a melody from (i think) the 16th century, in beach rock style
 
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