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Movie Masterpieces

Demensa

Characterless sack of potatoes
I just finished watching 2001: A Space Odyssey and I found myself wanting more movies that I could call 'masterpieces'.

Basically, I want films that have changed the way you think, films that are beautiful, films that are gripping, films that are brilliant.

Something that has changed your life.
 

Conker

Destroyer of Nazi Teddy Bears
Both 2001 and Tree of Life put me right the fuck to sleep, but I guess Tree of Life is something you could check out since it seems to be in that hyper pretentious vein of movies.

I thought Prometheus was a masterpiece--also a hyper pretentious movie, I just happened to like this one--but more because of its subtext and not because it'll change any lives.
 

NerdyMunk

Only a Book Smart Nerd
Inception.
Black Swan.
 

GhostWolf

Member
I can think of several

The Adventures of Mark Twain (The will Vinton animated version)
Wall-E
Casablanca
Star Wars
 

Sarcastic Coffeecup

Hand. Cannot. Erase.
Fifth element. I love it too much.
 

benignBiotic

Banned
Banned
Black Swan.
I can recommend this too Demens. That movie pulls no punches.

Demensa if you liked 2001: A Space Odyssey you might like Kubrick's other movies. The Shining, A Clockwork Orange, and Fullmetal Jacket are popular choices. I saw A Clockwork Orange recently and I highly recommend it. Just know that it had a lot of violence and rape.

Mulholland Drive has had a big effect on me since I saw it a few years ago. It's one of my favorites.

 
Secret of NIMH.

Yellow Submarine.

Watership Down.

Dark Star.

The Shining.

Tarka the Otter.

Here's a bit of trivia - Tarka the Otter is the film that made otters my favourite animal.
 

ElectricBlue1989

Living a Boy's Adventure Tale
Ben-Hur (1959):






After all these years, I still get excited at the action-y parts and moved to tears in the sad ones, all while still in awe at how well-made this epic is in all aspects: music, wardrobe, stunts, make-up, you name it. I always sit through all of its majestic 4 hours of this true cinematic masterpiece and never get tired of it, and it's one of the reasons why I look forward to Easter.
 

Butters Shikkon

Patron Saint of Queers
I've got two.

First off, the Color Purple. It's probably my favorite live action film of all time just due to the rich characters and the real sisterly bond you can feel b/w Celie and Nettie. Their separation scene is one of the saddest in cinema, with "Mr." dragging Nettie off while they cling to each other..."Nothing but Death can keep me from her!!" being one of the most badass line in the movie I think.

Maybe its because I'm very close to my own brother. I couldn't imagine my life without him so I really feel that agony as they are torn apart.

And secondly, Howl's Moving Castle. It's just a perfect, heartwarming film. I esp. love the how the witch of the waste is handled in it. I'd hate to spoil it, so I'll just say its not something you see everyday and the way its paced is very nice.
 

Ames

it smells like dust and moon light
Two off the top of my head:

The Fountain
All them feels, this movie truly is a work of art. Really thought-provoking message. Is death something to be feared? A disease to be cured? Or a gift to be welcomed with open arms?
Beautiful visuals and breathtaking music. Hugh Jackman was fucking awesome in this movie.

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Falling Down
Such a clusterfuck of conflicting emotions and moral ambiguity. Love it. One of my favorite Michael Douglas movies.

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Demensa

Characterless sack of potatoes
The Big Sleep (1946): Sexy, gripping, irresistible.

OOooh! This looks very promising. I'll see if I can check it out soon.

Inception.
Black Swan.

Black Swan and Inception happen to be two of my favourite recent releases. Inception was possibly the first movie I saw twice at the cinema. It's the type of movie that never bores you, however many times you see it. A lot of people fail to be really impressed by it and just take away the stereotypical "LOL dreams inside dreams is INCEPTION" opinion of the movie. I was pretty affected by it though.(The amazing soundtrack by Hans Zimmer makes everything 10 times better as well.)

Black Swan took me completely by surprise. One of the most tense movies I've ever watched.

I can recommend this too Demens. That movie pulls no punches.

Demensa if you liked 2001: A Space Odyssey you might like Kubrick's other movies. The Shining, A Clockwork Orange, and Fullmetal Jacket are popular choices. I saw A Clockwork Orange recently and I highly recommend it. Just know that it had a lot of violence and rape.

Mulholland Drive has had a big effect on me since I saw it a few years ago. It's one of my favorites.

A Clockwork Orange has been put right at the top of my list due to recommendations from everyone (And it's by Kubrik, possibly my favourite director of all time now.) The Shining is great as well. It's been a while since I've seen it, but now that I think about it, I can remember it in a similar way to 2001: A Space Odyssey, due to Kubrik's slow and suspenseful style of directing. The soundtracks to those movies are great as well. (In fact I think a very big distinguishing feature in films that I really like is that they usually have amazing soundtracks. This isn't always the case, but music tends to have a very big effect on me.)

I'd multiquote everything else, but I'm too lazy.
@JamesB - The Fountain is one of my favourites as well. Everything in that movie is stunning and exceptionally well done. The inner themes of the movie could not have been portrayed better in my opinion. (I liked what they did with the structure as well.)

The Fifth Element, Ben Hur, Falling Down, Tree of Life... etc. will all be added to my growing list of movies.

Oh, and bonus points for foreign masterpieces (Pan's Labyrinth comes to mind.) or avant garde masterpieces.

It's interesting to note that many of the movies I consider to be on a higher level come from the same directors, eg. Kubrik, Nolan, Wachowskis, etc.
Does anyone have a specific director they think of in the same way?
And I have yet to see The Artist as well. Can anyone here vouch for that?
 

Alekz

The Underwhelming
I very highly recommend watching "All Quiet on the Western Front" The movie follows a group of Germans that join the military right out of high school in 1914. I prefer the 1930s version of the film, but the 1979 version is also very good in my opinion.
Just as a warning though, it is a VERY depressing movie.
 

benignBiotic

Banned
Banned
And I have yet to see The Artist as well. Can anyone here vouch for that?
Aaaabsolutely! That was my favorite movie of last year. Though it's cliche to say: I laughed, I cried. It's a really great cinematic experience.
 

ElectricBlue1989

Living a Boy's Adventure Tale
And I have yet to see The Artist as well. Can anyone here vouch for that?

Aaaabsolutely! That was my favorite movie of last year. Though it's cliche to say: I laughed, I cried. It's a really great cinematic experience.

Seconded (or Third-ed... whatever)!

That movie proves that you can still have a compelling, original, even award-winning movie without the need for over-done, unnecessary movie-making clichés (gratuitous sex and violence, for example). Not even the sound of conversations! I was blown away...


Another recommendation, another Easter classic. My apologies for getting religious, but this is what I think of when I think 'movie masterpiece.' Back in the day, when a studio set out for a masterpiece, they set out for a masterpiece!

The Ten Commandments (1956):



Charlton Heston is the boss!
First of all, I must admit that it's been years since I've seen this (I don't even remember how it ends), and second, it's long (you totally got your money's worth out of the ticket price!). But I remember as a kid being blown away by the special effects, and by then I knew this movie was old!
It's basically the entire story of Moses: birth, Egyptian years, exile years, the liberation and exodus, to those 40 years that he had to put up with the unruly Hebrews (400 years of slavery didn't do them any favors).


I'd recommend Cleopatra (1963), but I only saw half of it, and I got mixed feelings towards her as a historical figure. But from what I remember, the details... the stuff they pulled...! It's the most expensive movies ever made (adjusted for inflation), highest-grossing movie of the year (1963), but it still it didn't make ends meet upon release.
 

Hateful Bitch

Hang up your coat
I really love In Bruges a lot. It's not changed the way I think at all, but it's so beautifully sad, and a little bit funny, and I love that kind of crap. Not many movies that can move me as much as that one did.

There's also The Wolf Children Ame and Yuki which recently has me in love a bit. The main character inspires me a lot with her quiet strength, and reminds me how little I try in life by comparison.
 

PsychicOtter

Otter Missionary
I very highly recommend watching "All Quiet on the Western Front" The movie follows a group of Germans that join the military right out of high school in 1914. I prefer the 1930s version of the film, but the 1979 version is also very good in my opinion.
Just as a warning though, it is a VERY depressing movie.

Never saw the movie, but the book is great.
And I agree with the 10 Commandments choice.
 

Xeras'na Bladewing

Guardian of the Twilight Realm
I find a large number of movies to be masterpieces, and some of them have been listed here. I'll present a few from my own list.

V For Vendetta
Dragonheart
Star Wars series
Highlander
Braveheart
Lord of the Rings trilogy
The Chronicles of Riddick (Director's Cut version)
Aliens
Jurassic Park
Princess Mononoke
Watchmen (Director's Cut version)
Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
Porco Rosso
The Secret of Nimh
Independence Day
Howl's Moving Castle
Sherlock Holmes (Robert Downey Jr. version)
Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows
Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (Yes, the original Gene Wilder one)
The Matrix trilogy
 

ElectricBlue1989

Living a Boy's Adventure Tale
In the 60's, Formula 1 movies were like vampire movies today: out of nowhere, everyone jumped on the theme, with mostly crappy results. This isn't one of them. On the contrary, it's arguably the best Formula 1 movie ever:

Grand Prix
(1966):






The movie goes beyond just showing what life was like in the 1960's (which is all the rage in some circles-- *coughs* Mad Men *coughs*), it shows a glimpse into the world of Formula 1... both sides of it.
It's not your typical racing movie. It both glorifies and criticizes the global phenomenon that is motorsports... I believe the same criticism still holds water today.

You're shown the glamour of traveling to exotic locales, lavish parties and the adoration of fans.
On the other side of the spectrum, you have flawed characters with flawed lives and lifestyles, and the high probability that one false move and it's all over, whether it's your career, health or life.

You may be left thinking if all the risk was worth it. It certainly made me think. I've come to believe that some of the characters would much rather stare death in the face for those few hours than having to deal with reality.

It's a long movie. I'm talking about Interim, Overture, the type of words you find in lengthy movies like Ben-Hur.

The movie moved in-board camera technology to new heights in realism. You truly get the feeling that you're in the race. And the level of detail (music, stuntwork, etc.) is stunning.

Not convinced? Look at this fan-made trailer:
[video=youtube;33w2hPO7t1g]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33w2hPO7t1g[/video]
 
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