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My Deviantart

krisCrash

Member
Really nice values! Maybe work on overall shape and attention to detail, some of your things are a little wonky. The charcoal drawings are very neatly done.
 

Zydala

Kisses for everyone!
I agree! You have a great eye for value and color. Now all you have to do is start working on form and use of space and you'll have a great foundation to start making great pictures :>
 
Thank you all, makes me feel a lot better.

I've noticed myself that some of the shapes looked a bit skewed. Its fixable though!
 

FireFeathers

Mr. Red Flag
I gotta commend you for using the full value range. Lots of people kinda puss out and keep in on the incredibly light side, or the incredibly dark side. Seeing a beginner with a full range is a refreshing breath of air. Lol

*serious face* As a college-attending art student about to graduate, I do this out of artistic bro-mance, alright? *is a woman*

1. Don't let a faceless group o' people tell you what to major in. We ain't you. We can't figure out how much joy or appreciation you get out of doing these pictures, where you fit in. There's a whole diverse rainbow of artistic majors, from fine art- general 'i'm going to paint this for the sake of me' art, and commercial art "i'm going to paint this for the sake of money" art. I come in from the latter, so keep that in mind. (it's actually kinda funny, because there's a whole sharks and jets thing going on with the fine artists vs commercial artists. You'd think they'd get along. Bah.)
2.Art school is not a cakewalk. Often, when you're knee-deep in art classes all day long, they'll give you assignments all due on the same day, and they don't care how much crap is going on at home, at your dorm , they wants what they wants. It's often a very tiring, droning type of work, something that can wear down on a person.More then a few of my collegues dropped out for this exact reason. Like any other career, it's something that fits you, not something you fall back onto as a backup.
It's also just as expensive as the rest of your classes. Lol.

Now onto the art: I see you're dabbling in digital and traditional, which is a great start. Many teachers are adamant that a strong traditional base will make a strong digital painter. Nowandays, most do both, or are at least able to work with both equally.

I think the lines in some of your charcoal drawings don't work. They're against the flow of the picture (like on a person's face) and can be distracting. Proportions are wacky in some areas, lines are outlining the side of the face next to the light (only a little, yours are pretty benign.) Hash-mark hair isn't a type of hair (unless it's made out of straw) and there's an lean to most of your pictures. Considering this is you debating on going into art, it's still a fantastic start. Your stuff is actually a lot like mine at your age. But with worse portraits. lol.

So, honestly, it comes down to if it's something that fits you or not.
 
I gotta commend you for using the full value range. Lots of people kinda puss out and keep in on the incredibly light side, or the incredibly dark side. Seeing a beginner with a full range is a refreshing breath of air. Lol

*serious face* As a college-attending art student about to graduate, I do this out of artistic bro-mance, alright? *is a woman*

1. Don't let a faceless group o' people tell you what to major in. We ain't you. We can't figure out how much joy or appreciation you get out of doing these pictures, where you fit in. There's a whole diverse rainbow of artistic majors, from fine art- general 'i'm going to paint this for the sake of me' art, and commercial art "i'm going to paint this for the sake of money" art. I come in from the latter, so keep that in mind. (it's actually kinda funny, because there's a whole sharks and jets thing going on with the fine artists vs commercial artists. You'd think they'd get along. Bah.)
2.Art school is not a cakewalk. Often, when you're knee-deep in art classes all day long, they'll give you assignments all due on the same day, and they don't care how much crap is going on at home, at your dorm , they wants what they wants. It's often a very tiring, droning type of work, something that can wear down on a person.More then a few of my collegues dropped out for this exact reason. Like any other career, it's something that fits you, not something you fall back onto as a backup.
It's also just as expensive as the rest of your classes. Lol.

Now onto the art: I see you're dabbling in digital and traditional, which is a great start. Many teachers are adamant that a strong traditional base will make a strong digital painter. Nowandays, most do both, or are at least able to work with both equally.

I think the lines in some of your charcoal drawings don't work. They're against the flow of the picture (like on a person's face) and can be distracting. Proportions are wacky in some areas, lines are outlining the side of the face next to the light (only a little, yours are pretty benign.) Hash-mark hair isn't a type of hair (unless it's made out of straw) and there's an lean to most of your pictures. Considering this is you debating on going into art, it's still a fantastic start. Your stuff is actually a lot like mine at your age. But with worse portraits. lol.

So, honestly, it comes down to if it's something that fits you or not.

Thank you for the feedback. In all seriousness though, I never did any art but digital stuff until I hit college.
 
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