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Need help with shading.

Rock E.Horror

Loves Cruis'n USA music
I've been trying to use shades on my drawings, so i made two pictures to practice it.

This is the first one, https://www.furaffinity.net/view/17105990/
i just wanted to try shading, thats why the character is so low-quality.

In the second one, https://www.furaffinity.net/view/17105919/
i detailed the character a bit more, also i changed the place of the light source.

I need some advices when shading, because in this drawings, i only did bassic shading.

Bye bye!

(and also tell me how do they look.)
 
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Gigglebot

New Member
I think your shedding is pretty good. I sis notice the hair anz pants didn't Have any highlights in them. I think that would help.
 

Rock E.Horror

Loves Cruis'n USA music
I think your shedding is pretty good. I sis notice the hair anz pants didn't Have any highlights in them. I think that would help.

Well, since they are black, i saw that shading them was not needed, also i dont know how to shade black things.
 

Gigglebot

New Member
It's just different values of darkness. Highlights will make a dramatic difference. They kinda go hand in hand with shading.
 

RailRide

The Real Wheels of Steel
Well, since they are black, i saw that shading them was not needed, also i dont know how to shade black things.

The shadows would be black. Any areas lit by the light source would be some shade of grey, tinted by the ambient light.

So for your pics of a character standing between the viewer and a setting sun, the lit parts of his pants would be something of a light grey, with some light orange overlay to tint the resulting highlight. And there will be some light reflecting off the outer edges of the character, since those parts aren't completely flat to begin with (or, shouldn't be depicted as such if the end result is intended to look three-dimensional).

---PCJ
 

Taralack

Hit 'em right between the eyes
Well, since they are black, i saw that shading them was not needed, also i dont know how to shade black things.

The first thing you have to understand when shading is that nothing is truly 100% black, not even black ink printed on black paper. No matter what, black objects will always reflect light from its light source. For example: https://cgcookie.com/image/shading-black-and-white-objects/

This article also talks about the same thing I mentioned and is a pretty good read: http://design.tutsplus.com/articles...-realistically-in-digital-painting--cms-24031
 

PlusThirtyOne

What DOES my username mean...?
i like the first image much better. As Taralack said, even black objects reflect some amount of light but the amount depends a little on the material and texture of the object. if you want to practice shading and experimenting with heavy light, try just drawing up some geometric shapes and playing with how shadows fall. it's a lot of fun, it's easy and it takes less effort than drawing up a complex figure. You can try applying different textured appearances to the shapes and moving your light sources. Study how light falls across a face too! Of course, face lighting is a little different for furry faces but the principles are the same. if you want to switch it up, try moving your light source to the FRONT of a figure and play a little more with reflections and other "bouncing" light.
You certainly have the right idea with the first image up there. Hard light is a great way to add dimension to your drawings but be careful, it can actually work against you if implemented poorly.
 
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